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    B.tech mae-2011-c B.tech mae-2011-c Document Transcript

    • Bachelor of Technology(Mechanical & Automation Engineering) Programme Code: BTM Duration – 4 Years Full Time Programme Structure And Curriculum & Scheme of Examination 2011AMITY UNIVERSITY HARAYANA
    • PREAMBLEAmity University aims to achieve academic excellence by providing multi- faceted educationto students and encourage them to reach the pinnacle of success. The University has designeda system that would provide rigorous academic programme with necessary skills to enablethem to excel in their careers.This booklet contains the Programme Structure, the Detailed Curriculum and the Scheme ofExamination. The Programme Structure includes the courses (Core and Elective), arrangedsemester wise. The importance of each course is defined in terms of credits attached to it. Thecredit units attached to each course has been further defined in terms of contact hours i.e.Lecture Hours (L), Tutorial Hours (T), Practical Hours (P). Towards earning credits in termsof contact hours, 1 Lecture and 1 Tutorial per week are rated as 1 credit each and 2 Practicalhours per week are rated as 1 credit. Thus, for example, an L-T-P structure of 3-0-0 will have3 credits, 3-1-0 will have 4 credits, and 3-1-2 will have 5 credits.The Curriculum and Scheme of Examination of each course includes the course objectives,course contents, scheme of examination and the list of text and references. The scheme ofexamination defines the various components of evaluation and the weightage attached to eachcomponent. The different codes used for the components of evaluation and the weightageattached to them are:Components Codes Weightage (%)Case Discussion/ Presentation/ Analysis C 05 - 10Home Assignment H 05 - 10Project P 05 - 10Seminar S 05 - 10Viva V 05 - 10Quiz Q 05 - 10Class Test CT 10 - 15Attendance A 05End Semester Examination EE 70It is hoped that it will help the students study in a planned and a structured manner andpromote effective learning. Wishing you an intellectually stimula ting stay at AmityUniversity.July, 2011
    • Amity School of Engineering and Technology: ObjectivesThe graduates of Amity School of Engineering and Technology shall: A. Demonstrate technical competence in engineering design and analysis consistent with the practice of a specialist and with the broad perspective of the generalist. B. Develop the hallmarks of professional conduct, including a keen cognizance of ethical choices, together with the confidence and skills to lead, to follow, and to transmit ideas effectively. C. Inculcate learning as a lifelong activity and as a means to the creative discovery, development, and implementation of technology. D. Become excellent professionals by developing strong human values and pride in their heritage and culture1. Goal of the Programme: The MAE program has established a broad goal and a set of specific objectives, given in Table below: MAE Program: Goal and Objectives Goal The aim of the Program is to provide practice oriented Mechanical and Automation engineering education that fosters personal, professional and social responsibility; technical excellence and creativity; and effective communication, teamwork and leadership so that the students are ready to meet the challenges of evolving society Detailed Objectives of MAE Program AS ET MAE Objective Objecti ve1 Graduates will understand the evolving Mechanical and Automation Engineering systems from their underlying A physical principles and properties.2 Graduates will design Mechanical and Automation Engineering systems by applying underlying mathematical A principles, supporting software for engineering model preparation and analysis.
    • 3 Graduates will be effective in team-based Mechanical and A Automation Engineering practice.4 Graduates will be proficient in the systematic explorations of alternatives for Mechanical and Automation A Engineering systems design.5 Graduates will demonstrate compliance with professional B ethics.6 Graduates will be proficient in the use of communications (oral presentations and written reports) to articulate their B ideas effectively.7 Graduates will be prepared for the continuing learning and self- improvement necessary for a productive career in C Mechanical and Automation Engineering.8 Graduates will play leadership roles in their professions, respect human values and have pride in their culture and B, D heritage.2. Students Outcomes : The broad student outcomes are based on the students ability to demonstrate: Outcome 1: (Scientific foundation) When faced with a technical problem the student should be able to use applied scientific knowledge 1A: to identify and implement relevant principles of mathematics and computer science. 1 B: to identify and implement relevant principles of physics and c hemistry 1 C: to identify and implement relevant principles of engineering science Outcome 2: (Experimentation) the ability to design experiments, conduct experiments, and analyze experimental data . Outcome 3: (Tools) an ability to use the relevant tools necessary for engineering practice. Outcome 4: (Technical design) the technical ability to design a prescribed engineering sub-system Outcome 5: (Design assessment) the ability to develop and assess alternative system designs based on technical and non-technical criteria 5A: to define overall needs and constraints. 5B: to assess the social and environmental requirements of the system and its impact on the global society. Outcome 6: (Professionalism) the ability to recognize and achieve high levels of professionalism in their work. Outcome 7: (Leadership) ability to assume leadership roles and respect human values.
    • Outcome 8: (Teamwork) the ability to function on teams. Outcome 9: (Communication) the ability to communicate effectively and persuasively. Outcome 10: (Ethics and morals) a critical understanding of ethical and moral systems and respect for human values in a social context. Outcome 11: (Diversity) an understanding and appreciation of diversity and pluralism. Outcome 12: (Lifelong learning) a recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in lifelong learning and development. 3. This booklet contains the Program Structure, the Detailed Curriculum and the Scheme of Examination. The Program Structure includes the courses (Core & Elective), arranged semester wise. The importance of each course is defined in terms of credits attached to it. The credit units attached to each course has been further defined in terms of contact hours i.e. lecture Hours (L), Tutorial Hours (T), Practical Hours (P). Towards earning credits in terms of contact hours, 1 Lecture and 1 Tutorial per week are rated as 1 credit each and 2 Practical hours per week are rated as 1 credit. Thus, for example, an L-T-P structure of 3-0-0 will have 3 credits, 3-1-0 will have 4 credits, and 3-1-2 will have 5 credits. 4. The Curriculum & Scheme of Examination of each course includes the course objectives, course contents, scheme of examination and the list of text & references. The scheme of examination defines the various components of evaluation and the weightage attached to each component. The different codes used for the components of evaluation and the weightage attached to them are: Components Codes Weightage (%) Case Discussion/ Presentation/ Analysis C 5 - 10 Home Assignment HA 5 - 10 Project P 5 - 10 Seminar S 5 - 10 Viva V 5 - 10 Quiz Q 5 - 10 Attendance A 5 Class Test CT 10-15 Term Paper TP 10 - 15 End Semester Examination EE 70 5. It is hoped that it will help the students study in a planned and a structured manner and promote effective learning. Wishing an intellectually stimulating stay at Amity University.March 2011
    • PROGRAMME STRUCUTRE FIRST SEMESTER Course Course Title Lecture Tutori al Practical Total Page Code (L) Hours (T) Hours (P) Hours Credits No. Per Week Per Week Per WeekBTM 101 Applied Mathematics - I 3 1 - 4BTM 102 Applied Physics-I – Fields & Waves 2 1 - 3BTM 103 Applied Chemistry 2 1 - 3BTM 104 Elements of Mechanical Engineering 2 - - 2BTM 105 Introduction to Computers & 2 1 - 3 Programming in CBTM 106 Electrical Science 2 1 - 3BTM 120 Applied Physics Lab - I - - 2 1BTM 121 Applied Chemistry Lab - - 2 1BTM 122 Elements of Mechanical Engineering - - 2 1 LabBTM 123 Programming in C Lab - - 2 1BTM 124 Electrical Science Lab - - 2 1 English 1 - - -BTM 143 Behavioural Science - I 1 - - 1 Foreign Language - I 2 - - 2BTM 144 FrenchBTM 145 GermanBTM 146 SpanishBTM 147 JapaneseBTM 148 Chinese TOTAL 26 SECOND SEMESTERBTM 201 Applied Mathematics - II 3 1 - 4BTM 202 Applied Physics-II – Modern Physics 2 1 - 3BTM 203 Environmental Studies 4 - - 4BTM 204 Object Oriented Programming using 2 1 - 3 C++BTM 205 Engineering Mechanics 2 1 - 3BTM 220 Applied Physics Lab - II - - 2 1BTM 221 Object Oriented Programming using - - 2 1 C++ LabBTM 222 Engineering Mechanics Lab - - 2 1BTM 223 Engineering Graphics Lab - - 2 1BTM 240 English 1 - - 3BTM 243 Behavioural Science – II 1 - - 1 Foreign Language - II 2 - - 2BTM 244 FrenchBTM 245 GermanBTM 246 SpanishBTM 247 JapaneseBTM 248 Chinese TOTAL 27 TERM PAPER DURING SUMMER BREAK THIRD SEMESTERBTM 301 Nu merical Analysis & Programming 3 - - 3BTM 302 Thermodynamics 2 1 - 3BTM 303 Mechanics of Solids 2 1 - 3BTM 304 Material Science & Metallurgy 3 - - 3BTM 305 Mechanics of Fluids 3 1 - 4BTM 306 Electronics 2 - - 2BTM 320 Mechanics of Solids & Fluids Lab - - 2 1BTM 321 Machine Drawing Lab - - 2 1
    • BTM 322 Programming Lab - I (Nu merical - - 2 1 Analysis)BTM 323 Electronics Lab - - 2 1BTM 341 Co mmunicat ion Skills – I 1 - - 1BTM 343 Behavioural Science – III 1 - - 1 Foreign Language - III 2 - - 2BTM 344 FrenchBTM 345 GermanBTM 346 SpanishBTM 347 JapaneseBTM 348 ChineseBTM 330 Term Paper (Evaluation) - - - 2 TOTAL 28 FOURTH SEMESTERBTM 401 Kinemat ics & Dynamics of Machines 3 1 - 4BTM 402 Heat & Mass Transfer 2 1 - 3BTM 403 Manufacturing Machines 3 - - 3BTM 404 Theory of Metal Forming 3 - - 3BTM 405 Electrical Mach ines 3 - - 3BTM 406 Principles of Co mputer Graphics 2 - - 2BTM 420 Kinemat ics & Dynamics of Machines - - 2 1 LabBTM 421 Manufacturing Machines Lab - - 2 1BTM 422 Electrical Mach ines Lab - - 2 1BTM 423 Principles of Co mputer Graphics Lab - - 2 1BTM 441 Co mmunicat ion Skills - II 1 - - 1BTM 443 Behavioural Science – IV 1 - - 1 Foreign Language - IV 2 - - 2BTM 444 FrenchBTM 445 GermanBTM 446 SpanishBTM 447 JapaneseBTM 448 Chinese TOTAL 26 PRACTICAL TRAINING FIFTH SEMESTERBTM 501 Machine Design – I 3 - - 3BTM 502 Metrology 3 - - 3BTM 503 Measurements & Controls 3 1 - 4BTM 504 Relational Database Management 3 - - 3 SystemBTM 505 Microprocessor System 3 1 - 4BTM 520 Machine Design Lab – I - - 2 1BTM 521 Metrology Lab - - 2 1BTM 522 Measurements & Controls Lab - - 2 1BTM 523 Microprocessor System Lab - - 2 1BTM 524 Programming Lab - II (MAT Lab) - - 2 1BTM 525 Relational Database Management - - 2 1 System LabBTM 541 Co mmunicat ion Skills - III 1 - - 1BTM 543 Behavioural Science – V 1 - - 1 Foreign Language - V 2 - - 2BTM 544 FrenchBTM 545 GermanBTM 546 SpanishBTM 547 JapaneseBTM 548 ChineseBTM 550 Practical Train ing (Evaluation) - - - 3 TOTAL 30
    • SIXTH SEMESTER BTM 601 Management of Manufacturing 3 - - 3 Systems BTM 602 Machine Design – II 3 - - 3 BTM 603 Flu id Power Systems 2 1 - 3 BTM 604 Metal Cutting & Tool Design 3 - - 3 BTM 605 IC Engine & Gas Turbine 3 - - 3 BTM 606 Co mputer Net works 2 1 - 3 BTM 620 Machine Design Lab - II - - 2 1 BTM 621 Flu id Power Systems Lab - - 2 1 BTM 622 Metal Cutting & Tool Design Lab - - 2 1 BTM 623 Co mputer Aided Drafting & Design - - 2 1 Lab BTM 641 Co mmunicat ion Skill – IV 1 - - 1 BTM 643 Behavioural Science – VI 1 - - 1 Foreign Language - VI 2 - - 2 BTM 644 French BTM 645 German BTM 646 Spanish BTM 647 Japanese BTM 648 Chinese TOTAL 26 INDUSTRIAL TRAINING SEVENTH SEMESTER BTM 701 Operations Research 3 - - 3 BTM 702 Co mputer Aided Manufacturing 3 - - 3 BTM 703 Mechatronics 3 - - 3 BTM 720 Operations Research (Programming) - - 2 1 Lab BTM 721 Co mputer Aided Manufacturing Lab - - 2 1 BTM 722 Mechatronics Lab - - 2 1 BTM 741 Co mmunicat ion Skills – V 1 - - 1 BTM 743 Behavioural Science – VII 1 - - 1 Foreign Language - VII 2 - - 2 BTM 744 French BTM 745 German BTM 746 Spanish BTM 747 Japanese BTM 748 Chinese BTM 750 Industrial Training (Evaluation) - - - 4 BTM 760 Project (Dissertation) - - - - EL ECTIVES (Any one from each categ ory) A (With Practical) BTM 704 Automotive Engineering 3 - - 3 BTM 705 Co mputer Aided Designing 3 - - 3 BTM 723 Automotive Engineering Lab - - 2 1 BTM 724 Co mputer Aided Designing Lab - - 2 1 B (Without Practical) BTM 706 Marketing Management 3 - - 3 BTM 707 Solar Energy 3 - - 3 BTM 708 Power Plant Practices 3 - - 3 BTM 709 Co mbustion Engine Emissions 3 - - 3 TOTAL 27 EIGHTH SEMESTER BTM 801 Quality Control & Quality Assurance 3 - - 3 BTM 802 Refrigerat ion & A ir-conditioning 3 - - 3 BTM 820 Refrigerat ion & A ir-conditioning Lab - - 2 1Electi ves (Any one from following wi th Practical) BTM 803 Advanced Methods of Manufacturing 3 - - 3 BTM 804 Gear Technology 3 - - 3
    • BTM 805 Artificial Intelligence & Robotics 3 - - 3BTM 821 Advanced Methods of Manufacturing - - 2 1 LabBTM 822 Gear Technology Lab - - 2 1BTM 823 Artificial Intelligence & Robotics Lab - - 2 1BTM 841 Co mmunicat ion Skills - VI 1 - - 1BTM 843 Behavioural Science - VIII 1 - - 1 Foreign Language - VIII 2 - - 2BTM 844 FrenchBTM 845 GermanBTM 846 SpanishBTM 847 JapaneseBTM 848 ChineseBTM 860 Project (Dissertation) - - - 15 TOTAL 30
    • Curriculum & Scheme of Examination APPLIED MATHEMATICS – ICourse Code: BTM 101 Credit Units: 04Course Objective:The knowledge of Mathematics is necessary for a better understanding of almost all the Engineering andScience subjects. Here our intention is to make the students acquainted with the concept of basic topics fromMathematics, wh ich they need to pursue their Engineering degree in different discip lines.Course Contents:Module I: Differential CalculusSuccessive differentiation, Leibnitz‟s theorem (without proof), Mean value theorem, Taylor‟s theorem (proof),Remainder terms, Asymptote & Curvature, Partial derivatives, Chain ru le, Differentiat ion of Implicit functions,Exact differentials, Tangents and Normals, Maxima, Appro ximations, Differentiation under integral sign,Jacobians and transformations of coordinates.Module II: Integral CalculusFundamental theorems, Reduction formulae, Propert ies of definite integrals, Applications to length, area,volume, surface of revolution, improper integrals, Mult iple Integrals -Double integrals, Applications to areas,volumes.Module III: Ordinary Di fferential EquationsFormation of ODEs, Definit ion of order, degree & solutions, ODE of first order : Method of separation ofvariables, homogeneous and non homogeneous equations, Exactness & integrating factors, Linear equations &Bernoulli equations, General linear ODE of n th order, Solution of homogeneous equations, Operator method,Method of undetermined coefficients, Solution of simple simultaneous ODE.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: Differential Calculus by Shanti Narain Integral Calcu lus by Shanti NarainReferences: Differential Equation by A.R. Forsyth Higher Eng ineering Mathemat ics by H.K. Dass
    • APPLIED PHYSICS - I - FIELDS AND WAVESCourse Code: BTM 102 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:Aim of th is course is to introduce the students to fundamentals of graduate level physics, wh ich form the basisof all applied science and engineeringCourse Contents:Module I: Oscillations & WavesOscillations: Introduction to S.H.M. Damped Oscillations: Differential Equation and its solution, logarith micdecrement, Quality Factor, Different conditions of damping of harmonic oscillations. Forced oscillations:Amplitude and Frequency Response, Resonance, Sharpness of ResonancePlane Progressive Waves: Differential Equation and Solution, Superposition of Progressive Waves stationarywaves.Ul trasonics: Generation and applicat ion of ultrasonicwaves.Module II: Wave Nature of LightInterference: Coherent Sources, Condit ions of interference, Interference due to division of wavefront, Fresnelsbipris m Interference due to division of amp litude, Newton‟s rings, Interference due to thin films, .Diffraction: Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, Fraunhofer diffract ion at a single slit, double slit, N Slits,Transmission grating, Rayleigh criterion and Resolving power o f grating.Polarization: Birefringence, Nicol p ris m, Production and analysis of plane, circu larly and elliptically polarizedlight, Half and quarter wave plates, Optical rotation, Po larimeter.Module III: ElectromagneticsScalar and vector fields, gradient of a scalar field, physical significance of gradient, equipotential surface. Line,surface and volume integrals, Divergence and curl of vector field and mathematical analysis physicalsignificance, Electric flu x, Gauss‟ law, Proof and Applicat ions, Gauss divergence and Stokes theorems.Differential form o f Gauss‟ Law, A mperes‟ Law, Displacement current, Faradays Law, Maxwell equations infree space & isotropic media (Integral form & differential form), EM wave propagation in free space, Poyntingvector.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References: Waves & oscillat ion, A. P. French Physics of waves, W. C. Elmo re & M. A. Heald Introduction to Electrodynamics, D. J. Griffith Electrodynamics, Gupta, Ku mar & Singh Optics, A. K. Ghatak Engineering Physics, Satya Prakash
    • APPLIED CHEMISTRYCourse Code: BTM 103 Credit Units: 03Course Objective :Four basic sciences, Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics and Biology are the building blocks in engineering andtechnology. Chemistry is essential to develop analytical capabilit ies of students, so that they can characterize,transform and use materials in engineering and apply knowledge in their field. A ll engineering fields haveunique bonds with chemistry whether it is Aerospace, Mechanical, Environmental and other fields the makeupof substances is always a key factor, which must be known. For electronics and computer science engineering,apart from the material, co mputer modeling and simulat ion knowledge can be inherited from the moleculedesigning. The upcoming field of technology like Nanotechnology and Biotechnology depends fully on theknowledge of basic chemistry. With this vers atile need in view, course has been designed in such a way so thatthe student should get an overview of the whole subject.Course Contents:Module I: Water Technolog yIntroduction and specifications of water,Hardness and its determination (EDTA method only),Alkalin ity,Boiler feed water, boiler problems – scale, sludge, priming & foaming: causes & prevention, Boiler problems –caustic embritt lement & corrosion : causes & prevention,Carbonate & phosphate conditioning, collo idal condition ing & calgon treat mentWater softening processes : Lime – soda process, Ion exchange method,Water for do mestic use.Module II: FuelsClassification, calorific value of fuel, (gross and net),Determination of calorific value of fuels, bo mb calorimeter,Solid fuels - Pro ximate and ultimate analysis,Octane & Cetane No. and its significance.Nu mericals on combustionModule III: Instrumental Methods of analysisIntroduction; Principles of spectroscopy; Laws of absorbanceIR: Princip le, Instrumentation, ApplicationUV: Princip le, Instrumentation, ApplicationNMR: Princip le, Instrumentation, ApplicationModule IV: LubricantsIntroduction; Mechanism of Lubrication;Types of Lubricants; Chemical structure related to Lubrication;Properties of lubricants; Viscosity and Viscosity Index; Iodine Value; Aniline Point; Emulsion number; FlashPoint; Fire Po int; Drop Po int; Cloud Point; Pour Po int.Selection of Lubricants.Module V: CorrosionIntroduction, Mechanism of dry and wet corrosion,Types of corrosion-Galvanic, Concentration cell, soil, pitting, intergranular, waterline. Passivity.Factors influencing corrosion.Corrosion control.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: Engineering Chemistry- Jain and Jain
    •  Engineering Chemistry- Sunita Rattan Engineering Chemistry - Shashi ChawlaReferences: Engineering Chemistry – Dara and Dara Spectroscopy- Y.R Sharma Corrosion Engineering – Fontenna and Greene
    • ELEMENTS OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERINGCourse Code: BTM 104 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:The objective of this course is to impart the basic knowledge of thermodynamics, stress - strain, materials & theirproperties and various manufacturing processes to the students of all engineering discipline.Course Contents:Module I: Fundamental ConceptsDefinition of thermodynamics, system, surrounding and universe, phase, concept of continuum, macroscopic &microscopic point of view, Thermodynamic equilibriu m, property, state, path, process, cyclic process, Zeroth,first and second law of thermodynamics, Carnot Cycle, Introduction to I.C. Engines -two &four stoke S.I. andC.I. engines. Otto cycle. Diesel cycle.Module II: Stress And Strain AnalysisSimp le stress and strain: introduction, normal shear, and stresses -strain diagrams for ductile and brittlematerials. Elastic constants, one-dimensional loadings of members of varying cross -section, Strain Energy,Properties of material-strength, elasticity, stiffness, malleab ility, ductility, britt leness, hardness and plasticityetc; Concept of stress and strain stress strain diagram, tensile test, impact test and hardness test.Module III: Casting & ForgingIntroduction of casting, pattern, mould making procedures, sand mould casting, casting defects, allowances ofpattern. Forging-introduction, upsetting & drawing out, drop forging, press forging & m/c forgingModule IV: Wel ding & Sheet metal workingIntroduction of welding processes, classification, gas weld ing, arc welding, resistance weld ing. Introduction tosheet metal shop, Shearing, trimming, blanking, piercing, shaving, notching, s tretch forming, n ibbling coin ing,embossing and drawing.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References: Engineering thermodynamics, by P.K. Nag, Tata McGraw Hill. Thermal Engineering, by D.S. Ku mar. S.K. Kataria and Sons. Thermal Engineering by PL Ballaney; Khanna Publishers, Delh i. Engineering Thermodynamics: Work and Heat Transfer, by Rogers an d Mayhew, ELBS Publicat ions Heine, R.W. C.R. Loper and P.C. Rosenthal, Principles of metal casting McGraw Hill Welding Technology by R.S. Parmar, Khanna Publishers. Thermodynamics and Heat Engines Volu me -I, by R. Yadav: Central Publications. Ganesan, V. Internal Co mbustion Engine, Tata McGraw-Hill. Mathur, M.L. and Sharma, R.P. Internal Co mbustion Engine. Dhanpat Rai Publication
    • INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS AND PROGRAMMING IN CCourse Code: BTM 105 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:The objective of this course module is to acquaint the students with the basics of computers system, itscomponents, data representation inside computer and to get them familiar with various important features ofprocedure oriented programming language i.e. C.Course Contents:Module I: IntroductionIntroduction to computer, history, von-Neumann architecture, memory system (h ierarchy, characteristics andtypes), H/W concepts (I/O Devices), S/W concepts (System S/W & Applicat ion S/W, utilit ies). DataRepresentation: Nu mber systems, character representation codes, Binary ,octal, hexadecimal and theirinterconversions. Binary arith metic, floating point arith metic, signed and unsigned numbers, Memory storageunit.Module II: Programmi ng in CHistory of C, Introduction of C, Basic structure of C program, Concept of variables, constants and data types inC, Operators and expressions: Introduction, arithmetic, relat ional, Logical, Assignment, Increment anddecrement operator, Conditional, bitwise operators, Expressions, Operator precedence and associativity.Managing Input and output Operation, formatting I/O.Module III: Fundamental Features in CC Statements, conditional executing using if, else, nesting of if, switch and break Concepts of loops, examp le ofloops in C using for, while and do-while, continue and break. Storage types (automatic, register etc.), predefinedprocessor, Co mmand Line Argument.Module IV: Arrays and Functi onsOne dimensional arrays and examp le of iterat ive programs using arrays, 2-D arrays Use in matrix co mputations.Concept of Sub-programming, functions Example of user defined functions. Function prototype, Return valuesand their types, calling function, function argu ment, function with variab le nu mber of argu ment, recursion.Module V: Advanced features in CPointers, relat ionship between arrays and pointers Argument passing using pointers, Array of pointers. Passingarrays as arguments.Strings and C string library.Structure and Union. Defin ing C structures, Giving values to members, Ar ray of structure, Nested structure,passing strings as arguments.File Handling.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: “ANSI C” by E Balagurusamy Yashwant Kanetkar, “Let us C”, BPB Publications, 2nd Edit ion, 2001. Herbert Sch ildt, “C: The comp lete reference”, Osbourne McGraw Hill, 4th Ed ition, 2002. V. Raja Raman, “Co mputer Programming in C”, Prentice Hall o f India, 1995.References: Kernighan & Ritchie, “C Programming Language”, The (Ansi C Version), PHI, 2 nd Ed ition. J. B Dixit, “Fundamentals of Co mputers and Programming in „C‟. P.K. Sinha and Priti Sinha, “Co mputer Fundamentals”, BPB publication.
    • ELECTRICAL SCIENCECourse Code: BTM 106 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:The objective of the course is to provide a brief knowledge of Electrical Engineering to students of alldisciplines. This Course includes some theorems related to electrical, some law‟s related to flow of current,voltages, basic knowledge of Transformer, basic knowledge of electromagnetis m, basic knowledge of electricalnetwork.Course Contents:Module I: B asic Electrical QuantitiesBasic Electrical definit ions-Energy, Power, Charge, Current, Vo ltage, Electric Field Strength, Magnetic Flu xDensity, etc., Resistance, Inductance and Capacitance. Ideal Source, Independent Source and Controlled SourceModule II: Network Analysis Techni ques & TheoremsCircuit Princip les: Oh m‟s Law, Kirchoff‟s Current Law, Kirchoff‟s Vo ltage Law Net work Reduction: Star–Delta Transformation, Source Transformation, Nodal Analysis, Loop analysis. Superposition theorem,Thevenin‟s Theorem, Norton‟s theorem and Reciprocity theorem.Module III: Alternating Current CircuitsPeak, Average and RMS values for alternating currents, Power calculation:reactive power, active power, Co mplex power, power factor, impedance, reactance, conductance, susceptanceResonance: series Resonance, parallel resonance, basic definit ion of Q factor & Band-width.Module IV: TransformersBasic Transformer Operat ion principle, Construction, Voltage relations, current relations, Linear circuit models,open circuit test, short circuit test, Transformer Efficiency.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References: R.J. Smith, R.C. Dorf: Circuits, devices and Systems B.L. Thareja: Electrical Technology : Part -1 & 2 V. Deltoro: Electrical Engineering fundamentals Schaum‟s Series: Electrical Circuits
    • APPLIED PHYSICS LAB - ICourse Code: BTM 120 Credit Units: 01List of Experime nts:1. To determine the wavelength of sodium light by Newton‟s rings method.2. To determine the dispersive power of the material of prism with the help of a spectrometer.3. To determine the specific rotation of sugar by Bi-quart z or Laurent half shade polarimeter.4. To determine the speed of ultrasonic waves in liquid by diffraction method.5. To determine the width of a narro w slit using diffraction phenomena.6. To determine the temperature coefficient of platinu m wire, using a platinum resistance thermo meter and a Callender & Griffth‟s bridge.7. To determine the value of specific charge (ratio of e/ m) of an electron by Thomson method.8. To determine the internal resistance of Leclanche cell with the help of Potentio meter.9. To determine the resistance per unit length of a Carey Foster‟s bridge wire and also to find out the specific resistance of a given wire.10. To plot graph showing the variation of magnetic field with distance along the aixs of a circu lar co il carry ing current, and hence estimate the rad ius of the coil.11. To determine the value of acceleration due to gravity („g‟) in the laboratory using bar pendulum.12. To determine the mo ment of inertia of a fly wheel about its own axis of rotation.13. To determine the density of material of the given wire with the help of sonometer.Examination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.
    • APPLIED CHEMISTRY LABCourse Code: BTM 121 Credit Units: 01Course Contents:List of Experime nts:(Any 10 Experi ments)1. To determine the ion exchange capacity of a given cation exchanger.2. To determine the temporary, permanent and total hardness of a sample o f water by co mplexo metric tit ration method.3. To determine the type and extent of alkalin ity of given water samp le.4. To determine the number of water mo lecules of crystallizat ion in Mohr‟s salt (ferrous ammoniu m sulphate) provided standard potassium dichro mate solution (0.1N) using diphenylamine as internal indicator.5. To determine the ferrous content in the supplied sample of iron ore by titrimetric analysis against standard K2 Cr2 O7 solution using potassium ferricyanide [K3 Fe(CN)6 ] as external indicator.6. To determine the surface tension of a given liquid by drop number method.7. To determine the composition of a liquid mixture A and B (acetic acid and water) by surface tension method.8. To prepare and describe a titration curve for phosphoric acid – sodium hydro xide titrat ion using pH-meter.9. To find the cell constant of conductivity cell.10. Determine the strength of hydrochloric acid solution by titrating it against standard sodium hydro xide solution conduct metrically11. Determination of Dissolved oxygen in the given water sample.12. To determine the total residual chlorine in water.13. Determination of amount of o xalic acid and H2 SO4 in 1 L of solution using N/10 NaOH and N/10 KMnO4 solution.14. Determination of viscosity of given oil by means of Redwood viscometer I.15. To determine flash point and fire point of an o il by Pensky Martin‟s Apparatus16. To determine the Iodine value of the oil.Examination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.
    • ELEMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING LABCourse Code: BTM 122 Credit Units: 01Course Contents:1. Welding (a) Arc Welding - Butt Joint - Lap Jo int - T Joint (b) Gas Welding - Butt Joint - Lap Jo int - Brazing of Bro ken pieces 2. Foundry - Sand mould casting by single piece pattern& Split pattern bracket with cores3. Sheet Metal - Dust Bin - Mug - Funnel - Cylindrical Mug with handle-Rectangular4. Fitting Shop - Male – Female Joint - Rectangular piece - Filing the jobExamination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.
    • PROGRAMMING IN C LABCourse Code: BTM 123 Credit Units: 01Software Required: Turbo CCourse Contents: C program involv ing problems like finding the nth value of cosine series, Fibonacci series. Etc. C programs including user defined function calls C programs involving pointers, and solving various problems with the help of those. File handlingExamination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.
    • ELECTRICAL SCIENCE LABCourse Code: BTM 124 Credit Units: 01List of Experime nts:1. To verify KVL & KCL in the given network.2. To verify Superposition Theorem.3. To verify Maximu m Power Transfer Theorem.4. To verify Reciprocity Theorem.5. To determine and verify RTh, VTh, RN, IN in a given network.6. To perform open circuit & short circuit test on a single-phase transformer.7. To study transient response of a given RLC Circuit.8. To perform regulation, ratio & polarity test on a single-phase transformer.9. To measure power & power factor in a three phase circuit by t wo watt meter method.10. To measure power & power factor in a three phase load using three ammeter & three volt meter method.Examination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.
    • ENGLISHCourse Objective:The course is intended to give a foundation of English Language. The literary texts are indented to help studentsto inculcate creative & aesthetic sensitivity and critical faculty through comprehension, appreciation andanalysis of the prescribed literary texts. It will also help them to respond form d ifferent perspectives.Course Contents:Module I: VocabularyUse of DictionaryUse of Words: Diminutives, Ho mony ms & Ho mophonesModule II: Essenti als of Grammar - IArticlesParts of SpeechTensesModule III: Essentials of Grammar - IISentence StructureSubject -Verb agreementPunctuationModule IV: CommunicationThe process and importancePrinciples & benefits of Effect ive Co mmunicationModule V: S poken English CommunicationSpeech DrillsPronunciation and accentStress and IntonationModule VI: Communication Skills -IDeveloping listening skillsDeveloping speaking skillsModule VII: Communication Skills -IIDeveloping Read ing SkillsDeveloping writ ing SkillsModule VIII: Written English communicati onProgression of Thought/ideasStructure of ParagraphStructure of EssaysModule IX: Short StoriesOf Studies, by Francis BaconDream Children, by Charles LambThe Necklace, by Guy de MaupassantA Shadow, by R.K. NarayanGlory at Twilight, Bhabani BhattacharyaModule X: PoemsAll the Worlds a Stage ShakespeareTo Autumn KeatsO! Captain, My Captain. Walt WhitmanWhere the Mind is Without Fear Rabindranath TagorePsalm of Life H.W. LongfellowExamination Scheme: Components A CT HA EE Weightage (% ) 05 15 10 70
    • Text & References: Madhulika Jha, Echoes, Orient Long Man Ramon & Prakash, Business Commun ication, Oxford. Sydney Greenbau m Oxford English Grammar, Oxfo rd. Successful Co mmun ications, Malra Treece (A llyn and Bacon) Effective Technical Co mmunicat ion, M. Ashraf Rizv i.* 30 hrs Programme to be continued for Full year
    • BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCE - I (UNDERSTANDING SELF FOR EFFECTIVENESS)Course Code: BTM 143 Credit Units: 01Course Objective: This course aims at impart ing: Understanding self & process of self exp loration Learn ing strategies for development of a healthy self esteem Importance of attitudes and its effective on personality Building Emot ional Co mpetenceCourse Contents:Module I: Self: Core CompetencyUnderstanding of SelfCo mponents of Self – Self identitySelf conceptSelf confidenceSelf imageModule II: Techni ques of Self AwarenessExp lorat ion through Johari WindowMapping the key characteristics of selfFraming a charter for selfStages – self awareness, self acceptance and self realizat ionModule III: Self Es tee m & Effecti venessMeaning and ImportanceCo mponents of self esteemHigh and lo w self esteemMeasuring your self esteemModule IV: Buil ding Positive AttitudeMeaning and nature of attitudeCo mponents and Types of attitudeImportance and relevance of attitudeModule V: B uil ding Emotional CompetenceEmot ional Intelligence – Meaning, components, Importance and RelevancePositive and Negative emotionsHealthy and Unhealthy expression of emotionsModule VI: End-of-Semester AppraisalViva based on personal journalAssessment of Behavioural change as a result of train ingExit Level Rating by Self and ObserverExamination Scheme:Components SAP A Mi d Term VIVA Journal for Test (CT) Success (JOS)Weightage (% ) 20 05 20 30 25Text & References: Organizational Behaviour, Dav is, K. Hoover, Judhith D. Effective Small Group and Team Co mmunicat ion, 2002,Harcourt Co llege Publishers Dick, Mc Cann & Margerison, Charles: Team Management, 1992 Edit ion, viva books Bates, A. P. and Julian, J.: Sociology - Understanding Social Behaviour Dressler, David and Cans, Donald: The Study of Hu man Interaction Lapiere, Richard. T – Social Change Lindzey, G. and Borgatta, E: Socio metric Measurement in the Handbook of Social Psychology, Addison – Welsley, US. Rose, G.: Oxford Textbook of Public Health, Vo l.4, 1985.
    •  LaFasto and Larson: When Teams Work Best, 2001, Response Books (Sage), New Delhi J William Pfeiffer (ed.) Theories and Models in Applied Behavioural Science, Vo l 2, Group (1996); Pfeiffer & Co mpany Smither Robert D.; The Psychology of Work and Hu man Performance, 1994, Harper Collins College Publishers
    • FRENCH - ICourse Code: BTM 144 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:To familiarize the students with the French language with the phonetic system with the syntax with the manners with the cultural aspectsCourse Contents:Module A: pp. 01 to 37: Unités 1, 2, Unité 3 Object if 1, 2Only grammar o f Unité 3: objectif 3, 4 and 5Contenu lexical: Uni té 1: Découvrir l a langue française : (oral et écrit) 1. se présenter, présenter quelqu‟un, faire la connaissance des autres, formu les de politesse, rencontres 2. dire/interroger si on comprend 3. No mmer les choses Unité 2: Faire connaissance 1. donner/demander des informat ions sur une personne, premiers contacts, exprimer ses goûts et ses préférences 2. Parler de soi: parler du travail, de ses activités, de son pays, de sa ville. Unité 3: Org aniser son temps 1. d ire la date et l‟heureContenu grammatical: 1. organisation générale de la grammaire 2. article indéfin i, défin i, contracté 3. nom, adject if, masculin, féminin, singulier et pluriel 4. négation avec « de », "moi aussi", "mo i non plus" 5. interrogation : Inversion, est-ce que, qui, que, quoi, qu‟est-ce que, où, quand, comment, quel(s ), quelle(s) Interro-négatif : réponses : oui, si, non 6. pronom tonique/disjoint- pour insister après une préposition 7. futur procheExamination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: le livre à suivre : Campus: To me 1
    • GERMAN - ICourse Code: BTM 145 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:To enable the students to converse, read and write in the language with the help of the basic rules of grammar,which will later help them to strengthen their language.To give the students an insight into the culture, geography, political situation and economic opportunitiesavailable in GermanyCourse Contents:Module I: IntroductionSelf introduction: heissen, ko mmen, wohnwn, lernen, arbeiten, trin ken, etc.All personal pronouns in relation to the verbs taught so far.Greetings: Guten Morgen!, Guten Tag!, Guten Abend!, Gute Nacht!, Danke sehr!, Danke!, Vielen Dank!, (estut mir Leid!),Hallo, wie geht‟s?: Danke gut!, sehr gut!, prima!, ausgezeichnet!, Es geht!, nicht so gut!, so la la!, miserabel!Module II: Interviews pielTo assimilate the vocabulary learnt so far and to apply the words and phrases in short dialogues in an interview– game for self introduction.Module III: PhoneticsSound system of the language with special stress on DipthongsModule IV: Countries, nati onalities and their l anguagesTo make the students acquainted with the most widely used country n ames, their nationalit ie and the languagespoken in that country.Module V: ArticlesThe definite and indefin ite articles in masculine, femin ine and neuter gender. All Vegetables, Fruits, Animals,Furniture, Eatables, modes of TransportModule VI: ProfessionsTo acquaint the students with professions in both the genders with the help of the verb “sein”.Module VII: PronounsSimp le possessive pronouns, the use of my, your, etc.The family members, family Tree with the help of the verb “to have”Module VIII: Col oursAll the color and color related vocabulary – colored, colorful, colorless, pale, light, dark, etc.Module IX: Numbers and calculations – verb “kosten”The counting, plural structures and simple calculat ion like addition, subtraction, mult iplication and division totest the knowledge of nu mbers.“Wie viel kostet das?”Module X: Revision list of Question pronounsW – Questions like who, what, where, when, which, how, how many, how much, etc.Examination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: Wolfgang Hieber, Lern ziel Deutsch Hans-Heinrich Wangler, Sprachkurs Deutsch
    •  Schulz Griesbach, Deutsche Sprachlehre für Ausländer P.L Aneja, Deutsch Interessant- 1, 2 & 3 Rosa-Maria Dallap iazza et al, Tangram Aktuell A1/ 1,2 Braun, Nieder, Sch möe, Deutsch als Fremdsprache 1A, Grundkurs
    • SPANISH – ICourse Code: BTM 146 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:To enable students acquire the relevance of the Spanish language in today‟s global context, how to greet eachother. How to present / introduce each other using basic verbs and vocabularyCourse Contents:Module IA brief h istory of Spain, Lat in A merica, the language, the culture…an d the relevance of Spanish language intoday‟s global context.Introduction to alphabetsModule IIIntroduction to „Saludos‟ (How to greet each other. Ho w to present / introduce each other).Goodbyes (despedidas)The verb llamarse and practice of it.Module IIIConcept of Gender and Nu mberMonths of the years, days of the week, seasons. Introduction to numbers 1-100, Colors, Rev ision of numbersand introduction to ordinal numbers.Module IVIntroduction to SER and ESTAR (both of which mean To Be).Revis ion of „Saludos‟ and „Llamarse‟. Someadjectives, nationalities, professions, physical/geographical location, the fact that spanish adjectives have toagree with gender and number of their nouns. Exercises highlighting usage of Ser and Estar.Module VTime, demonstrative pronoun (Este/esta, Aquel/aquella etc)Module VIIntroduction to some key A R / ER/IR ending regular verbs.Examination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: Español, En Directo I A Español Sin Fronteras
    • JAPANESE - ICourse Code: BTM 147 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:To enable the students to learn the basic rules of grammar and Japanese language to be used in daily life thatwill later help them to strengthen their language.Course Contents:Module I: SalutationsSelf introduction, Asking and answering to small general questionsModule II: Cardinal NumbersNu merals, Expression of time and period, Days, monthsModule III: TensesPresent Tense, Future tenseModule IV: PrepositionsParticles, possession, Forming questionsModule V: Demonstrati vesInterrogatives, pronoun and adjectivesModule VI: DescriptionCo mmon phrases, Adjectives to describe a personModule VII: ScheduleTime Table, everyday routine etc.Module VIII: OutingsGo ing to see a movie, party, friend‟s house etc.Learning Outcome Students can speak the basic language describing above mentioned topicsMethods of Private study /Self help Handouts, audio-aids, and self-do assignments and role-plays will support classroom teachingExamination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References:Text: Teach yourself JapaneseReferences: Shin Nihongo no kiso 1
    • CHINESE – ICourse Code: BTM 148 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:There are many dialects spoken in China, but the language which will he lp you through wherever you go isMandarin, or Putonghua, as it is called in Chinese. The most widely spoken forms of Chinese are Mandarin,Cantonese, Gan, Hakka, Min, Wu and Xiang. The course aims at familiarizing the student with the basic aspectsof speaking ability of Mandarin, the language of Mainland China. The course aims at training students inpractical skills and nurturing them to interact with a Chinese person.Course Contents:Module IShow pictures, dialogue and retell.Getting to know each other.Practicing chart with In itials and Finals. (CHART – The Ch inese Phonetic Alphabet Called “Hanyu Pinyin” inMandarin Chinese.)Practicing of Tones as it is a tonal language.Changes in 3rd tone and Neutral Tone.Module IIGreetingsLet me IntroduceThe modal particle “ne”.Use of Please „qing” – sit, have tea ………….. etc.A brief self introduction – Ni hao ma? Zaijian!Use of “bu” negative.Module IIIAttributives showing possessionHow is your Health? Thank youWhere are you fro m?A few Professions like – Eng ineer, Businessman, Doctor, Teacher, Worker.Are you busy with your work?May I know your name?Module IVUse of “How many” – People in your family?Use of “zhe” and “na”.Use of interrogative particle “shenme”, “shui”, “ma” and “nar”.How to make interrogative sentences ending with “ma”.Structural particle “de”.Use of “Nin” when and where to use and with whom. Use of guixing.Use of verb “zuo” and how to make sentences with it.Module VFamily structure and Relat ions.Use of “you” – “mei you”.Measure wordsDays and Weekdays.Nu mbers.Maps, different languages and Countries.Examination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: “Elementary Chinese Reader Part I” Lesson 1-10
    • APPLIED MATHEMATICS – IICourse Code: BTM 201 Credit Units: 04Course Objective:The knowledge of Mathematics is necessary for a better understanding of almost all the Engineering andScience subjects. Here our intention is to make the students acquainted with the concept of basic topics fromMathematics, wh ich they need to pursue their Engineering degree in different discip lines.Course Contents:Module I: Linear AlgebraHermitian and Skew Hermit ian Matrix, Unitary Matrix, Orthogonal Matrix, Elementary Row Transformat ion,Reduction of a Matrix to Row Echelon Form, Rank of a Matrix, Consistency of Linear Simultaneous Equations,Gauss Elimination Method, Gauss -Jordan Method, Eigen Values and Eigen Vectors of a Matrix, Caley-Hamilton Theorem, Diagonalization of a Matrix, Vector Space, Linear Independence and Dependence ofVectors, Linear Transformations.Module II: Infini te SeriesDefinition of Sequence, Bounded Sequence, Limit of a Sequence , Series, Finite and Infinite Series,Convergence and Divergence of Infinite series, Cauchy‟s Principle of Convergence, Positive Term In fin iteSeries, Co mparison test, D‟Alembert‟s Ratio test. Raabe‟s Test, Cauchy‟s nth root Test. Logarithmic Test,Alternating Series, Leibnit z‟s Test, Absolute and conditioinal convergence, Uniform Convergence, Power Seriesand its Interval of Convergence.Module III: Complex AnalysisDe Moivre‟s Theorem and Roots of Co mplex Nu mbers, Logarithmic Functions, Circular, Hyperbo lic Functionsand their Inverses.Functions of a Co mplex Variables, Limits, Continuity and Derivatives, Analytic Function, Cauchy -RiemannEquations (without proof), Harmon ic Function, Harmonic Conjugates, Conformal Mapping, BilinearTransformat ions, Co mple x Line Integral, Cauchy Integral Theorem, Cauchy Integral Formu la, Derivative ofAnalytic Function, Power Series, Tay lor Series, Laurent Series, Zeroes and Singularit ies, Residues, Residue 2  f ( x)Theorem, Evaluation of Real Integrals of the Form  0 F (cos  , sin  ) d and   F ( x) dx .Module IV: Statistics and ProbabilityMoments, Skewness, Kurtosis, Random Variables and Probability Distribution, Mean and Variance of aProbability Distribution, Bino mial Distribution, Po isson Distribution and Normal Distribution.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References: Engineering Mathematics by Erwin Kreyszig. Engineering Mathematics by R.K. Jain and S.R.K. Iyengar. Higher Eng ineering Mathemat ics by H.K. Dass. Engineering Mathematics by B.S. Grewal. Differential Calculus by Shanti Narain. Integral Calcu lus by Shanti Narain. Linear Algebra - Schau m Outline Series.
    • APPLIED PHYSICS - II - MODERN PHYSICSCourse Code: BTM 202 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:Aim of th is course is to introduce the students to fundamentals of graduate level physics which form the basis ofall applied science and engineeringCourse Contents:Module I: S pecial Theory of Relati vityMichelson-Morley experiment, Importance of negative result, Inertial & non -inertial frames of reference,Einstein‟s postulates of Special theory of Relativity, Space-time coordinate system, Relativ istic Space Timetransformation (Lo rentz transformat ion equation), Transformation of velocity, Addition of velocit ies, Lengthcontraction and Time dilation, Mass -energy equivalence (Einstein‟s energy mass relation) & Derivation ofVariation of mass with velocity,Module II: Wave MechanicsWave particle duality, De -Broglie matter waves, phase and group velocity, Heisenberg uncertainty principle,wave function and its physical interpretation, Operators, expectation values. Time dependent & timeindependent Schrödinger wave equation for free & bound states, square well potential (rigid wall), Steppotential.Module III: Atomic PhysicsVector atom model, LS and j-j coupling, Zeceman effect (normal & anomalous), Paschen -Bach effect, X-rayspectra and energy level diagram, Moseleys Law, Lasers – Einstein coefficients, conditions for lightamp lification, population inversion, optical pumping, three level and four level lasers, He -Ne and Ruby laser,Properties and applications of lasers.Module IV: Soli d State PhysicsSommerfield‟s free electron theory of metals, Fermi energy, Introduction to periodic potential & Kronig -Pennymodel (Qualitative) Band Theory of Solids, Semi-conductors: Intrinsics and Extrinsic Semiconductors,photoconductivity and photovotaics, Basic aspects of Superconductivity, Meissner effect.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References : Concept of Modern Physics, A. Beiser Applied Physics II, Agarawal & Goel Solid State Physics, S. O. Pallai Physics of Atom, Wehr & Richards
    • ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIESCourse Code: BTM 203 Credit Units: 04Course Objective:The term environ ment is used to describe, in the aggregate, all the external forces, influences and conditions,which affect the life, nature, behaviour and the growth, development and maturity of liv ing organisms. Atpresent a great number of environment issues, have grown in size and comp lexity day by day, threatening thesurvival of mankind on earth. A study of environmental studies is quite essential in all types of environmentalsciences, environmental engineering and industrial management. The objective of e nvironmental studies is toenlighten the masses about the importance of the protection and conservation of our environment and control ofhuman activit ies which has an adverse effect on the environment.Course Contents:Module I: The multi disciplinary nature of environmental studiesDefinition, scope and importanceNeed for public awarenessModule II: Natural ResourcesRenewable and non-renewable resources:Natural resources and associated problemsForest resources: Use and over-exploitation, deforestation, case studies. Timber extraction, min ing, dams andtheir effects on forests and tribal people.Water resources: Use and over-utilization of surface and ground water, floods, drought, conflicts over water,dams-benefits and problems.Mineral resources: Use and exp loitation, environ mental effects of extract ing and using mineral resources, casestudies.Food resources: World food problems, changes caused by agriculture and overgrazing, effects of modernagriculture, fert ilizer-pesticide problems, water logging, salinity, case studies.Energy resources: Gro wing energy needs, renewable and non -renewable energy sources, use of alternate energysources, case studies.Land resources: Land as a resource, land degradation, man induced landslides, soil erosion and desertification.  Role of an individual in conservation of natural resources.  Equitable use of resources for sustainable lifestyles.Module III: EcosystemsConcept of an ecosystemStructure and function of an ecosystemProducers, consumers and decompos ersEnergy flow in the ecosystemEcological successionFood chains, food webs and ecological pyramidsIntroduction, types, characteristic features, structure and function of the following ecosystem: a. Forest ecosystem b. Grassland ecosystem c. Desert ecosystem d. Aquatic ecosystems (ponds, streams, lakes, rivers, ocean estuaries)Module IV: Biodi versity and its conservati onIntroduction – Definit ion: genetic, species and ecosystem diversityBiogeographical classificat ion of IndiaValue of biodiversity: consumptive us e, productive use, social, ethical aesthetic and option valuesBiodiversity at global, national and local levelsIndia as a mega-diversity nationHot-spots of biodiversityThreats to biodiversity: habitat loss, poaching of wildlife, man wildlife conflictsEndangered and endemic species of IndiaConservation of biodiversity: In-situ and Ex-situ conservation of biodiversityModule V: Environmental PollutionDefinition a. Air pollution
    • b. Water pollution c. Soil pollution d. Marine pollution e. Noise pollution f. Thermal pollution g. Nuclear pollutionSolid waste management: Causes, effects and control measures of urban and industrial wastes.Role of an individual in prevention of pollution.Pollution case studies.Disaster management: floods, earthquake, cyclone and landslides.Module VI: Social Issues and the EnvironmentFro m unsustainable to sustainable developmentUrban problems and related to energyWater conservation, rain water harvesting, watershed managementResettlement and rehabilitation of people; its problems and concerns. Case studies.Environmental ethics: Issues and possible solutionsClimate change, global warming, acid rain, ozone layer depletion, nuclear accidents and holocaust. Case studies.Wasteland reclamationConsumerism and waste productsEnvironmental Protection ActAir (Prevention and Control of Po llution) ActWater (Prevention and control of Pollution) ActWildlife Protection ActForest Conservation ActIssues involved in enforcement of environmental leg islationPublic awarenessModule VII: Human Population and the EnvironmentPopulation growth, variat ion among nationsPopulation explosion – Family Welfare ProgrammesEnvironment and human healthHu man RightsValue EducationHIV / AIDSWomen and Child WelfareRole of In formation Technology in Environ ment and Hu man HealthCase StudiesModule VIII: Fiel d WorkVisit to a local area to document environ mental assets -river / forest/ grassland/ hill/ mountain.Visit to a local polluted site – Urban / Rural / Industrial / AgriculturalStudy of common plants, insects, birdsStudy of simp le ecosystems-pond, river, h ill slopes, etc (Field work equal to 5 lecture hours)Examination Scheme:Components CT HA S/V/Q A EEWeightage (% ) 15 5 5 5 70Text & References: Agarwal, K.C. 2001 Environ mental Bio logy, Nidi Publ. Ltd. Bikaner. Bharucha Erach, The Biodiversity of India, Mapin Publishing Pvt. Ltd., Ahmedabad 380 013, India, Email:mapin@icenet.net (R) Brunner R.C., 1989, Hazardous Waste Incineration, McGraw Hill Inc. 480p Clark R.S., Marine Pollution, Clanderson Press Oxfo rd (TB) Cunningham, W.P. Cooper, T.H. Go rhani, E & Hepworth, M.T. 2001, Environ ment al Encyclopedia, Jaico Publ. House, Mumabai, 1196p De A.K., Env iron mental Chemistry, Wiley Eastern Ltd. Down to Earth, Centre for Science and Environ ment (R) Gleick, H.P. 1993. Water in Crisis, Pacific Institute for Studies in Dev., Environ ment & Security. Stockholm Env. Institute Oxford Univ. Press. 473p Hawkins R.E., Encyclopedia of Indian Natural History, Bo mbay Natural History Society, Bo mbay (R) Heywood, V.H & Waston, R.T. 1995. Global Biodiversity Assessment. Camb ridge Univ. Press 1140p.
    •  Jadhav, H & Bhosale, V.M. 1995. Environmental Protection and Laws. Himalaya Pub. House, Delh i 284 p. Mckinney, M.L. & School, R.M. 1996. Environ mental Science Systems & Solutions, Web enhanced edition. 639p. Mhaskar A.K., Matter Hazardous, Techno-Science Publication (T B) Miller T.G. Jr. Environ mental Science, Wadsworth Publishing Co. (TB) Odum, E.P. 1971. Fundamentals of Ecology. W.B. Saunders Co. USA, 574p Rao M N. & Datta, A.K. 1987. Waste Water treatment. Oxfo rd & IBH Publ. Co. Pvt. Ltd. 345p. Sharma B.K., 2001. Environ mental Chemistry. Geol Publ. House, Meerut Survey of the Environ ment, The Hindu (M) Townsend C., Harper J, and Michael Begon, Essentials of Eco logy, Blackwell Science Trivedi R.K., Handbook of Environ mental Laws, Rules Guidelines, Co mp liances and Standa rds, Vol I and II, Enviro Media (R) Trivedi R. K. and P.K. Goel, Introduction to air pollution, Techno -Science Publicat ion (TB) Wanger K.D., 1998 Environnemental Management. W.B. Saunders Co. Philadelphia, USA 499p
    • OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING USING C++Course Code: BTM 204 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:The objective of this module is to introduce object oriented programming. To exp lore and implement the variousfeatures of OOP such as inheritance, polymorphis m, Exceptional handling using p rogramming language C++.After completing this course student can easily identify the basic difference between the programmingapproaches like procedural and object oriented.Course Contents:Module I: IntroductionReview of C, Difference between C and C++, Procedure Oriented and Object Oriented Approach. BasicConcepts: Objects, classes, Principals like Abstraction, Encapsulation, Inheritance and Polymorphism. DynamicBinding, Message Passing. Characteristics of Object-Oriented Languages. Introduction to Object-OrientedModeling techniques (Object, Functional and Dynamic Modeling).Module II: Classes and ObjectsAbstract data types, Object & classes, attributes, methods, C++ class declaration, Local Class and Global Class,State identity and behaviour of an object, Local Object and Global Object, Scope resolution operator, FriendFunctions, Inline functions, Constructors and destructors, instantiation of objects, Types of Constructors, StaticClass Data, Array of Objects, Constant member functions and Objects, Memory management Operators.Module III: InheritanceInheritance, Types of Inheritance, access modes – public, private & protected, Abstract Classes, Ambiguityresolution using scope resolution operator and Virtual base class, Aggregation, compos ition vs classificationhiérarchies, Overriding inheritance methods, Constructors in derived classes, Nesting of Classes.Module IV: Pol ymorphismPoly morphis m, Type of Poly morphis m – Co mp ile time and runtime, Function Overloading, OperatorOverloading (Unary and Binary) Poly morphis m by parameter, Pointer to objects, this pointer, Virtual Functions,pure virtual functions.Module V: Strings, Files and Exception HandlingManipulating strings, Streams and files handling, formatted and Unformatted Inp ut output. Exception handling,Generic Programming – function temp late, class Template Standard Template Library : Standard Temp lateLibrary, Overv iew of Standard Template Library, Containers, Algorith ms, Iterators, Other STL Elements, TheContainer Classes, General Theory of Operation, Vectors.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: A.R. Venugopal, Rajku mar, T. Ravishanker “Mastering C++”, TMH, 1997 R. Lafore, “Ob ject Oriented Programming using C++”, BPB Publications, 2004. “Object Oriented Programming with C++” By E. Balagurusamy. Schildt Herbert, “C++: The Co mp lete Reference”, W iley DreamTech, 2005.References: Parasons, “Object Oriented Programming with C++”, BPB Publication, 1999. Steven C. Lawlor, “The Art of Programming Co mputer Science with C++”, Vikas Publicat ion, 2002. Yashwant Kanethkar, “Ob ject Oriented Programming using C++”, BPB, 2004
    • ENGINEERING MECHANICSCourse Code: BTM 205 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:Objective of this course is to provide fundamental knowledge of force system and its effect on the behaviour ofthe bodies that may be in dynamic or in static state. It includes the equilibriu m of different structures like beams,frames, truss etc and the force transfer mechanism in the different components of a body under given loadingcondition.Course Contents:Module I: Force system & StructureFree body diagram, Equ ilibriu m equations and applications. Plane truss, perfect and imperfect truss, assumptionin the truss analysis, analysis of perfect plane trusses by the method of jo ints, method of section.Module II: Fricti onStatic and Kinetic friction, laws of dry friction, co-efficient of frict ion, angle of frict ion, angle of repose, cone offriction, friction lock, efficiency of screw jack, transmission of power through beltModule III: Distributed ForceDetermination of center of gravity, center of mass and centroid by direct integration and by the method ofcomposite bodies, mass mo ment of inertia and area mo ment of inertia by direct integration and compositebodies method, radius of gyration, parallel axis theorem, Pappus theorems and its application, polar mo ment ofinertia.Module IV: Work -EnergyWork energy equation, conservation of energy, Virtual work, impu lse, mo mentum conservation, impact ofbodies, co-efficient of restitution, loss of energy during impact, D‟alembert pr incipleExamination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References: S.S. Bhavikatti, Engineering Mechanics , New Age International Ltd Timoshenko, Engineering Mechanics, McGraw Hill R. S. Khurmi, Engineering Mechanics, S. Chand Publication I. H. Shames & G. K. M. Rao, Engineering Mechanics, Pearson Education, 2006
    • APPLIED PHYSICS LAB - IICourse Code: BTM 220 Credit Units: 01List of Experime nts:1. To determine the wavelength of pro minent lines of mercury spectrum using plane transmission grating.2. To determine the thickness of a given wire by Wedge method.3. To determine the wavelength of He -Ne laser light using single slit.4. To determine the frequency of an electrically maintained tunning fork by Melde‟s method.5. To study the variation of magnetic field along the axis of Helmho ltz coil and to find out reduction factor.6. To draw the V – I characteristics of a forward and reverse bias PN junction diode.7. To determine the frequency of AC mains using sonometer.8. To determine the energy band-gap of Germaniu m crystal using four probes method.9. To draw V – I characteristics of a photocell and to verify the inverse square law of radiation.10. To determine the accelerat ion due to gravity („g‟) using Keter‟s reversible pendulu m.11. To study the characteristics of photo voltaic cell (solar cell).Examination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.
    • OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING USING C++ LABCourse Code: BTM 221 Credit Units: 01Software Required: Turbo C++Course Contents: Creat ion of objects in programs and solving problems through them. Different use of private, public member variables and functions and friend functions. Use of constructors and destructors. Operator overloading Use of inheritance in and accessing objects of different derived classes. Poly morphis m and virtual functions (using pointers). File handling.Examination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.
    • ENGINEERING MECHANICS LABCourse Code: BTM 222 Credit Units: 01Course Contents: To verify the law of Fo rce Po lygon. To verify the law of Mo ments using Parallel Fo rce apparatus. (Simply supported type) To determine the co-efficient of friction between wood and various surface (like Leather, Wood, Aluminu m) on an inclined plane. To find the forces in the members of Jib Crane. To determine the mechanical advantage, Velocity ratio and efficiency of a screw jack. To determine the mechanical advantage, Velocity ratio and Mechanical efficiency of the Wheel and Axle To determine the MA, VR,  of Worm Wheel (2-start) Verification of force transmitted by members of given truss. To verify the law of mo ments using Bell cran k lever To find CG and mo ment of Inert ia of an irregular body using Computation methodExamination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.
    • ENGINEERING GRAPHICS LABCourse Code: BTM 223 Credit Units: 01Course Objective:This course will p rovide students concepts on the drawings of different curves like straight line, parabola, ellipseetc. After completion of this course, students will be able to draw different figures manually and will be capableof using various instruments involved in drawings.Course Contents:Module I: GeneralImportance, Significance and scope of engineering drawing, Lettering, Dimensioning , Scales, Sense ofproportioning, Different types of projections, Orthographic Pro jection, B.I.S. Specifications.Module II: Projections of Point and LinesIntroduction of planes of projection, Reference and auxiliary planes, projections of points and Lines in differentquadrants, traces, inclinations, and true lengths of the lines, pro jections on Auxiliary p lanes, shortest distance,intersecting and non-intersecting lines.Module III: Planes other than the Reference Pl anesIntroduction of other planes (perpendicular and oblique), their traces, inclinations etc., Projections of points andlines ly ing in the planes, conversion of oblique plane into au xiliary Plane and solution of related problems.Module IV: Projecti ons of Plane FiguresDifferent cases of plane figures (of different shapes) making different angles with one or both reference planesand lines lying in the plane figures making different given angles (with one of both reference p lanes). Obtainingtrue shape of the plane figure by project ion.Module V: Projection of SolidsSimp le cases when solid is placed in different positions, Axis faces and lines lying in the faces of the solidmaking given angles.Module VI: Development of SurfaceDevelop ment of simple objects with and without sectioning. Isometric Pro jectionExamination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.Text & References: M.B. Shah & B.C. Rana, Eng ineering Drawing, Pearson Education, 2007 PS Gill, Engineering Drawing, Kataria Pub lication ND Bhatt, Engineering Drawing, Charotar publicat ions N Sidheshwar, Engineering Drawing, Tata McGraw Hill CL Tanta, Mechanical Drawing, “Dhanpat Rai”
    • ENGLISHCourse Code: BTM 240 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:The course is intended to give a foundation of English Language. The literary texts are indented to help studentsto inculcate creative & aesthetic sensitivity and critical faculty through comprehension, appreciation andanalysis of the prescribed literary texts. It will also help them to respond form d ifferent perspectives.Course Contents:Module I: VocabularyUse of DictionaryUse of Words: Diminutives, Ho mony ms & Ho mophonesModule II: Essenti als of Grammar - IArticlesParts of SpeechTensesModule III: Essentials of Grammar - IISentence StructureSubject -Verb agreementPunctuationModule IV: CommunicationThe process and importancePrinciples & benefits of Effect ive Co mmunicationModule V: S poken English CommunicationSpeech DrillsPronunciation and accentStress and IntonationModule VI: Communication Skills - IDeveloping listening skillsDeveloping speaking skillsModule VII: Communication Skills - IIDeveloping Read ing SkillsDeveloping writ ing SkillsModule VIII: Written English communicati onProgression of Thought/ideasStructure of ParagraphStructure of EssaysModule IX: Short StoriesOf Studies, by Francis BaconDream Children, by Charles LambThe Necklace, by Guy de MaupassantA Shadow, by R.K. NarayanGlory at Twilight, Bhabani BhattacharyaModule X: PoemsAll the Worlds a Stage ShakespeareTo Autumn KeatsO! Captain, My Captain. Walt WhitmanWhere the Mind is Without Fear Rabindranath TagorePsalm of Life H.W. LongfellowExamination Scheme : Components A CT HA EE Weightage (% ) 05 15 10 70
    • Text & References: Madhulika Jha, Echoes, Orient Long Man. Ramon & Prakash, Business Commun ication, Oxford. Sydney Greenbau m Oxford English Grammar, Oxfo rd. Successful Co mmun ications, Malra Treece (A llyn and Bacon). Effective Technical Co mmunicat ion, M. Ashraf Rizv i.
    • BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCE - II (PROBLEM SOLVING AND CREATIVE THINKING)Course Code: BTM 243 Credit Units: 01Course Objective:To enable the students: Understand the process of problem solving and creative thinking. Facilitation and enhancement of skills required for decision-making.Course Contents:Module I: Thinking as a tool for Problem Sol vingWhat is thinking: The M ind/Brain/BehaviourCritical Th inking and Learning:Making Predictions and ReasoningMemory and Critical Th inkingEmot ions and Crit ical ThinkingThinking skillsModule II: Hi ndrances to Problem Sol vi ng ProcessPerceptionExp ressionEmot ionIntellectWork environ mentModule III: Problem Sol vingRecognizing and Defining a prob lemAnalyzing the problem (potential causes)Developing possible alternativesEvaluating SolutionsResolution of problemImplementationBarriers to problem solving:PerceptionExp ressionEmot ionIntellectWork environ mentModule IV: Plan of Acti onConstruction of POAMonitoringReviewing and analy zing the outcomeModule V: Creati ve ThinkingDefinition and meaning of creativityThe nature of creative thinkingConvergent and Divergent thinkingIdea generation and evaluation (Brain Storming)Image generation and evaluationDebatingThe six-phase model o f Creat ive Thinking: ICEDIP modelModule VI: End-of-Semester AppraisalViva based on personal journalAssessment of Behavioural change as a result of train ingExit Level Rating by Self and ObserverExamination Scheme:Components SAP A Mi d Term VIVA Journal for Test (CT) Success (JOS)Weightage (% ) 20 05 20 30 25
    • Text & References: Michael Steven: How to be a better problem solver, Kogan Page, New Delhi, 1999 Geoff Petty: How to be better at creativity; Kogan Page, New Delhi, 1999 Richard Y. Chang and P. Keith, Kelly: Wheeler Publishing, New Delhi, 1998. Phil Lowe Koge Page: Creativ ity and Problem Solv ing, New Delhi, 1996 J William Pfeiffer (ed.) Theories and Models in Applied Behavioural Science, Vol 3, Management (1996); Pfeiffer & Co mpany Bensley, Alan D.: Critical Thin king in Psychology – A Unified Skills Approach, (1998), Brooks/Cole Publishing Co mpany.
    • FRENCH - IICourse Code: BTM 244 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:To enable the students to overcome the fear of speaking a foreign language and take position as a foreignerspeaking French.To make them learn the basic ru les of French Grammar.Course Contents:Module A: pp.38 – 47: Uni té 3: Object if 3, 4, 5. 6Module B: pp. 47 to 75 Unité 4 , 5Contenu lexical: Uni té 3: Organiser son temps 1. donner/demander des informations sur un emplo i du temps, un horaire SNCF – Imag iner un dialogue 2. rédiger un message/ une lettre pour … i) p rendre un rendez-vous/ accepter et confirmer/ annuler ii) inviter/accepter/refuser 3. Faire un programme d‟act ivités imag iner une conversation téléphonique/un dialogue Propositions- interroger, répondre Uni té 4: Découvrir son environnement 1. situer un lieu 2. s‟orienter, s‟informer sur un it inéraire. 3. Chercher, décrire un logement 4. connaître les rythmes de la v ie Uni té 5: s’informer 1. demander/donner des informations sur un emplo i du temps passé. 2. donner une explication, exp rimer le doute ou la cert itude. 3. découvrir les relations entre les mots 4. savoir s‟informerContenu grammatical: 1. Adject ifs démonstratifs 2. Adjectifs possessifs/exprimer la possession à l‟aide de : i. « de » ii. A+no m/pronom disjoint 3. Conjugaison pronominale – négative, interrogative - construction à linfinit if 4. Impératif/exp rimer l‟obligation/l‟interdict ion à l‟aide de « il faut …. »/ «il ne faut pas… » 5. passé composé 6. Questions directes/indirectesExamination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: le livre à suivre : Campus: To me 1
    • GERMAN – IICourse Code: BTM 245 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:To enable the students to converse, read and write in the language with the help of the basic rules of grammar,which will later help them to strengthen their language.To give the students an ins ight into the culture, geography, political situation and economic opportunitiesavailable in GermanyIntroduction to Grammar to consolidate the language base learnt in Semester ICourse Contents:Module I: Everything about Ti me and Ti me periodsTime and times of the day.Weekdays, months, seasons.Adverbs of time and time related prepositionsModule II: Irregul ar verbsIntroduction to irregular verbs like to be, and others, to learn the conjugations of the same, (fahren, essen,lessen, schlafen, sprechen und ähnliche).Module III: Separable verbsTo comprehend the change in meaning that the verbs undergo when used as suchTreat ment of such verbs with separable prefixesModule IV: Reading and comprehensionReading and deciphering railway schedules/school time tableUsage of separable verbs in the above contextModule V: Accusati ve caseAccusative case with the relevant articlesIntroduction to 2 different kinds of sentences – Nominative and AccusativeModule VI: Accusati ve personal pronounsNo minative and accusative in comparisonEmphasizing on the universal applicability of the pronouns to both persons and objectsModule VII: Accusati ve prepositionsAccusative propositions with their useBoth theoretical and figurative useModule VIII: Dialog uesDialogue reading: „In the market place‟ „At the Hotel‟Examination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: Wolfgang Hieber, Lern ziel Deutsch Hans-Heinrich Wangler, Sprachkurs Deutsch Schulz Griesbach, Deutsche Sprachlehre für Ausländer P.L Aneja, Deutsch Interessant- 1, 2 & 3 Rosa-Maria Dallap iazza et al, Tangram A ktuell A1/1,2 Braun, Nieder, Sch möe, Deutsch als Fremdsprache 1A, Grundkurs
    • SPANISH – IICourse Code: BTM 246 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:To enable students acquire more vocabulary, grammar, Verbal Phrases to understand simple texts and startdescribing any person or object in Simple Present Tense.Course Contents:Module IRevision of earlier modules.Module IISome more A R/ ER/IR verbs. Introduction to root changing and irregular AR/ ER/IR ending verbsModule IIIMore verbal phrases (eg, Dios Mio, Que lastima etc), adverbs (bueno/malo, muy, mucho, bastante, poco).Simp le texts based on grammar and vocabulary done in earlier modules.Module IVPossessive pronounsModule VWriting/speaking essays like my friend, my house, my school/institution, myself….descriptions of people,objects etc, computer/internet related vocabularyExamination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: Español, En Directo I A Español Sin Fronteras
    • JAPANESE - IICourse Code: BTM 247 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:To enable the students to converse in the language with the help of basic particles and be able to define thesituations and people using different adjectives.Course Contents:Module I: VerbsTransitive verbs, intransitive verbsModule II: More prepositionsMore particles, art icles and likes and dislikes.Module III: Terms used for i nstructionsNo parking, no smo king etc.Module IV: AdverbsDifferent adverbial exp ression.Module V: Invi tations and celebrationsGiv ing and receiving presents,Inviting somebody for lunch, dinner, movie and how to accept and refuse in different waysModule VI: Comprehension’sShort essay on Family, Friend etc.Module VII: Conversati onsSituational conversations like asking the way, At a post office, familyModule VIII: IllnessGo ing to the doctor, hospital etc.Learning Outcome Students can speak the language describing above-mentioned topics.Methods of Private study /Self help Handouts, audio-aids, and self-do assignments. Use of library, visiting and watching movies in Japan and culture center every Friday at 6p m.Examination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References:Text: Teach yourself JapaneseReferences: Shin Nihongo no kiso 1
    • CHINESE – IICourse Code: BTM 248 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:Chinese is a tonal language where each syllable in isolation has its definite tone (flat, falling, rising andrising/falling), and same syllab les with different tones mean different things. When you say, “ma” with a thirdtone, it mean horse and “ma” with the first tone is Mother. The course aims at familiarizing the student with thebasic aspects of speaking ability of Mandarin, the language of Mainland China. The course aims at trainingstudents in practical skills and nurturing them to interact with a Ch inese person.Course Contents:Module IDrillsPractice reading aloudObserve Picture and answer the question.Tone practice.Practice using the language both by speaking and by taking notes.Introduction of basic sentence patterns.Measure words.Glad to meet you.Module IIWhere do you live?Learn ing different colors.Tones of “bu”Buying things and how muchit costs?Dialogue on change of Money.More sentence patterns on Days and Weekdays.How to tell time. Saying the units of time in Chinese. Learning to say useful phrases like – 8:00, 11:25, 10:30P.M. everyday, afternoon, evening, night, morning 3:58, one hour, to begin, to end ….. etc.Morning, Afternoon, Evening, Night.Module IIIUse of words of location like -li, wais hang, xiaFurniture – table, chair, bed, bookshelf,.. etc.Description of roo m, house or hostel room.. eg what is placed where and how many things are there in it?Review Lessons – Preview Lessons.Exp ression „yao”, “xiang” and “yaoshi” (if).Days of week, months in a year etc.I am learn ing Ch inese. Is Chinese difficu lt?Module IVCounting fro m 1-1000Use of “chang-chang”.Making an Inquiry – What time is it now? Where is the Post Office?Days of the week. Months in a year.Use of Preposition – “zai”, “gen”.Use of interrogative pronoun – “duoshao” and “ji”.“Whose”??? Sweater etc is it?Different Games and going out for exercise in the morning.Module VThe verb “qu” Go ing to the lib rary issuing a book fro m the library Go ing to the cinema hall, buying tickets Go ing to the post office, buying stamps Go ing to the market to buy things.. etc Go ing to the buy clothes …. Etc.Hobby. I also like swimming.Co mprehension and answer questions based on it.
    • Examination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: “Elementary Chinese Reader Part I” Lesson 11-20
    • NUMERICAL ANALYSIS AND PROGRAMMINGCourse Code: BTM 301 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:This course deals with the techniques of numerical analysis, wh ich gives the solution to applied problem whenordinary analytical method fails. Emphasis is given on computer programming also so that the given techniquescan be used in design of engineering and scientific problems.Course Contents:Module I: Solution of Algebraic and Transcendental Equati onError in a series appro ximation, Bisection Method, Iteration method, Method of false position, Newton -RaphsonmethodSolutions of Si multaneous equationGauss elimination method, Jacobi iteration method, Gauss Seidal methodModule II: Interpol ationFin ite Differences, Difference tablesPolynomial Interpolation: Newton‟s forward and backward formu laCentral Difference Formulae: Gauss forward and backward formu la.Interpolation with unequal intervals: Lagrange‟s Interpolation, Newton Divided difference fo rmulaModule III: Numerical Integrati on and Differenti ationIntroduction, Numerical d ifferentiation Nu merical Integration: Trapezoidal rule, Simpson‟s 1/3 and 3/8 rule s.Module IV: Soluti on of differential EquationsEu ler‟s Method, Runga-Kutta Methods.Module V: Statistical ComputationFrequency chart, Curve fitting by method of least squares, fitting of straight lines, polynomials, exponentialcurves etc, Data fitting with Cubic splines.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: Rajaraman V, “Co mputer Oriented Nu merical Methods”, Pearson Education Gerald & Whealey, “Applied Nu merical Analyses”, AW Jain, Iyengar and Jain, “Nu merical Methods for Scientific and Engineering Co mputations”, New Age Int. Grewal B S, “Nu merical methods in Engineering and Science”, Khanna Publishers, Delh iReferences: T Veerarajan, T Ramachandran, “Theory and Problems in Nu merical Methods, TMH Pradip Niyogi, “Nu merical Analysis and Algorith ms”, TMH Francis Scheld, ” Nu merical Analysis”, TMH Sastry S. S, “Introductory Methods of Nu merical Analysis”, Pearson Education. Gupta C.B., Vijay Gupta, “Introduction to Statistical Methods”, Vikas Publishing. Goyal, M, “Co mputer Based Nu merical and Statistical Techniques”, Firewall Med ia, New Delhi.
    • THERMODYNAMICSCourse Code: BTM 302 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:Objective of this course is to impart in depth understanding of the principles of thermodynamics and heattransfer. This course also helps students understand the application of basic fluid mechanics, thermodynamic ,and heat transfer principles and techniques, including the use of empirical data, to the analysis of representativeflu id and thermal energy co mponents and systems encountered in the practice of electrical, electronic, industrial,and related disciplines of engineering.Course Contents:Module I: B asic conceptsThermodynamic system, intensive and extensive properties, cyclic process, Zeroth Law of Thermodynamics,Work and heat, Flo w workModule II: First Law of ThermodynamicsMechanical equivalent of heat, internal energy, Analysis of non-flow system, flow process and control volume,steady flow, energy equation, flow processesModule III: Second Law of Thermodynamics and EntropyHeat Engine, heat pump, Kelv in Planck and Clausius statement of Second Law of Thermodynamics, Perpetualmotion mach ine, Reversible cycle- Carnot Cycle, Clausius inequality, entropy, Principle of entropy increase,concepts of availability, irreversibility.Module IV: Air-CyclesCarnot cycle, Otto cycle, Diesel cycle, Dual cycle, St irling cycle, Erricsson cycle, Brayton cycle; ReversedCarnot cycle.Module V: Properties of SteamUse of steam tables, wet steam, superheat steam, d ifferent processes of vapour, Mollier Diagram.Module VI: Reci procating Air compressorsSingle stage compressor, Isothermal efficiency, adiabatic efficiency, clearance volu me, volu metric efficiency,and mult i-stage compression with intercooling.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: P.K. Nag, “Engineering Thermodynamics”, Tata McGraw Hill Incropera, “Engineering Thermodynamics”, John WillyReferences: Engel, T. and Reid, P., Thermodynamics, Statistical Thermodynamics & Kinetics, Pearson Education, 2006 Cengel & Boles, “Thermodynamics”, Tata McGraw Hill. Sonntag/Vanhylene, Fundamentals of Thermodynamics, Wiley Rahul Gupta, Engineering Thermodynamics, Asian Books P. Ltd. Y.V.C. Rao, Engineering Thermodynamics, Khanna Publications Onkar Singh, Applied Thermodynamics, New Age Publications. Dhomkundwar Kothandaraman, “A Course in Thermal Engineering”, Dhanpat Rai Publicat ions
    • MECHANICS OF SOLIDSCourse Code: BTM 303 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:The objective of this course is to make the students understand the concept of stress and strain in different typesof structure/machine under different loading conditions. The course also covers the simple and co mpoundstresses due to forces, stresses and deflection in beams due to bending, torsion in circular section, strain energy,different theories of failu re, stress in thin cylinder thick cylinder and spheres due to external and internalpressure.Course Contents:Module I: Simple stresses and strainsConcept of stress and strain; Hooke‟s law, Young‟s modulus, Po isson ratio, stress at a point, stress and strains inbars subjected to axial loading. Modulus of elasticity, stress produced in compound bars subject to axial loading.Temperature stress and strain calculations due to applications of axial loads and variation of temperature insingle and compound walls .Module II: Compound stress and strainsThe two dimensional system; stress at a point on a plane, principal stresses and principal p lanes; Mohr‟s circleof stress. Graphical and Analytical methods for stresses on oblique section of body. Shear force and bendingmo ment diagrams for cantilever, simp ly supported and overhanging beams.Module III: Bending StressTheory of bending stresses in beams due to bending, assumptions in the simple bending theory, derivation offormula: its application to beams of rectangular, circu lar and channel sections, composite / flitched beams,bending and shear stresses in composite beams.Module IV: TorsionDerivation of torsion equation and its assumptions. Applications of the equation of the hollow and solid circularshafts torsional rigidity, co mbined torsion and bending of circular shafts principal stress and maximu m shearstresses under combined loading of bending and torsion, analysis of close-coiled-helical springs.Module V: Thin cylinders and s pheresDerivation of formu lae and calcu lation of hoop stress, longitudinal stress in a cylinder and sphere subjected tointernal pressure.Module VI: Columns and strutsColu mns and failure of columns, Euler‟s formulas; Rankine-Gordon‟s formu la, Johnson‟s empirical formu la foraxially loaded colu mns and their applications.Module VII: Slope and deflectionRelationship between moment, slope and deflection, Mohr‟s theorem; Moment area method; method ofintegration; Macaulay‟s method: Use of all these methods to calculate slope and deflection for the following:a) Cantileversb) Simply supported beams with or without overhangc) Under concentrated loads, uniformly distributed loads or combination of concentrated and uniformlydistributed loadsExamination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Qui z, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: Jindal U.C., “St rength of Materials”, Galgotia Publicat ion, New Delh i, 1998. Ryder G.H., “Strength of Materials”, Macmillan, Delh i, 2003. R.K. Bansal, “Strength of Materials”, Laxmi Publication, New Delhi, 2001.
    • References: Sadhu Singh, “Strength of Materials”, Khanna Publishers, New Delh i, 2000. Timoshenko S.P., “Elements of Strength of Materials”, East-West affiliated, New Delh i, 2000. Hibbler R.C., “Mechanics of Materials”, Prentice Hall, New Delh i, 1994. Popov Eger P., “Engg. Mechanics of solids”, Prentice Hall, New Delhi, 1998. Fenner, Roger. T, “Mechanics of Solids”, U.K. B.C. Publicat ion, New Delhi, 1990. Srinath L.S. et.al., “St rength of Materials”, McMillan, New Delhi,2001
    • MATERIAL SCIENCE AND METALLURGYCourse Code: BTM 304 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:Metallurgy and Materials deal with the structure and properties of all materials, which have engineeringapplications. Metallurg ists and Materials Engineers are responsible for designing, producing, examining andtesting materials as diverse as metallic engineering alloys, semiconductors and superconductors, ceramics,plastics and composites. This course will help students understand the propertie s of different types of materialsand their applications.Course Contents:Module IAtomic structure of metals crystal structure, crystal lattice of (i) Body centered cubic (ii) face centered cubic(iii) closed packed hexagonal, crystallographic notatio n of atomic planes, poly morphism and allotropy,solidification of crystallizat ion (i) nuclear formation (crystal growth) (ii) crystal imperfection Elementarytreatment of theories of plastic deformation, phenomenon of slip twinning, d islocation, identifica tion ofcrystallographic possible slip planes and direction in FCC, BCC, C.P., recovery, re -crystallization, preferredorientation causes and effects on the property of metals.Module IIIntroduction to Engineering materials, their mechanical behavio ur, testing and manufacturing properties ofmaterials, physical properties of materials, classification of engineering materials.Module IIIGeneral principles of phase transformation in alloys, phase rule and equilibriu m diagrams, Equilibriu m d iagramsof Binary system in which the co mponents form a mechanical mixture of crystals in the solid state and arecompletely mutually soluble in both liquid state. Equilibriu m d iagrams of a systems whose components havecomplete mutual solubility in the liquid state and limited solubility in the solid state in which the solid statesolubility deceases with temperature. Equilibriu m diagram of alloys whose components have complete mutualsolubility in the liquid state and limited solubility in solid state (Alloy with a peritectic transformation)Equilibriu m diagrams of a system whose components are subject to allotropic change. Iron carbon equilibriu mdiagram. Phase transformation in the iron carbon diagram (i) Formation of Austenite (ii) Transformation ofaustenite into pearlite (iii) Martensite transformation in steel, time temperature transformation curves.Module IVPrinciples and applications of heat treatment processes viz. annealing, normalizing hardening, tempering; hardenability & its measurement, surface hardening processes. Defects in heat treatment and their remedies; effectsproduced by alloying elements on the structures and properties of steel. Distribution of alloying elements (Si,Mn. Ni. Cr. Mo. TL. A l) in steel.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References: Text: V. Raghavan, “Material Science & Engineering”, Prentice Hall India Ltd., 2001 . Shackelford, J.F. and Muralidhara, M.K., Introduction to Material Science for Engineers (6/e), Pearson Education, 2007 S.K. Hazra Chaudhuri, “Material Science & Processes”, Indian Book Publishers, Calcutta, 1983. R.B. Gupta, “Material Science Processes”, Satya Prakashan, New Delhi, 2000.References: Degarmo E. Pau l et.al, “Materials & Processes in Manufacture”, Prentice Hall India, New Delh i, 2001. Ray mond A Higgim., “Engineering Metallurgy Part 1”, Prentice Hall India, New Delh i, 1998. L. Krishna Reddi, “Principles of Engineering Metallurgy”, New Age Publication, New Delhi, 2001. Buduisky et al, “Engineering Materials & Propert ies”, Prentice Hall India, New Delh i, 2004. Peter Haasten, “Physical Metallurgy”, Cambridge Univ. Press, 1996.
    • MECHANICS OF FLUIDSCourse Code: BTM 305 Credit Units: 04Course Objective:The objective of Fluid Mechanics subject is that students should understand the, properties of fluids, pressuremeasurement devices, hydraulic forces on surfaces, bouncy and flotation in fluids, kinemat ics and staticbehaviour of fluids, dimension and model analysis, laminar and turbulent flow, flo w through pipes and orifices,boundary layer theory.Course Contents:Module I: Flui d Properties and Flui d StaticsNewtonian and Non-Newtonian Fluids; Viscosity; Incompressible and compressible fluids, co mpressibility.Forces on plane surfaces, forces on curved surfaces, buoyant forces, and stability of floating bodies, metacentreand metacentre height.Module II: Ki nematics of Fl ui d MotionSteady and unsteady flow; uniform and non-uniform flow; Laminar and turbulent flo w; streamline, path line andstreak line; continuity equation, irrotational and rotational flow, velocity potential and stream function, vortexflow, free and forced vortex.Module III: Dynamics of Flui d Fl owEu ler‟s equation of motion and its integration to yield Bernoulli‟s equation, its practical applications – Pilottube, Venturi meter; steady flow mo mentum equation, fo rce exerted on a pipe bend.Module IV: Di mensional Analysis and Princi ples of Si milarityBuckingham -Theorem and its applications, Geo metric, Kinemat ics and Dynamic similarity; Dimensionlessnumbers-Reynolds, Froude, Euler, Mach, Weber Nu mber and their significance.Module V: Laminar and Turbulent FlowReynold‟s experiment, crit ical velocity, steady laminar flow through a circular tube, flo w between parallelplates. Transition from laminar to turbulent flow, courses of turbulence, velocity distribution law near a solidboundary, velocity distribution in rough pipes, Hazen – Williams‟s formu la.Module VI: Anal ysis of Pi pe Fl owEnergy losses, minor losses in pipe lines, concept of equivalent length, flo w between two reservoirs, andmu ltip le pipe systems – in series and parallel, siphon.Module VII: Flow MeasurementsMeasurement of flow using Venturi meter, orifice meter, Pitot tube, measurement of flow in open channels –rectangular, triangular, trapezoidal weir, Cipoeletti weir.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: R.K. Bansal, “Fluid Mechanics & Hydraulic Mach ines”, Laxmi Pub lications (P) Ltd., 2002. Gupta, S. C., Flu id Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines, Pearson Education, 2007 D.S. Ku mar, “Fluid Mechanics and Fluid Power Engineering”, S.K. Kataria & Sons, 2000.References: F. M. White, Introduction to Fluid Mechanics, McGraw Hill I.H. Shames, “Mechanics of Fluids”, Tata McGraw Hill Douglas, J. F., Gasiorek, J.M. and Swaffield, J., Fluid Mechanics, Pearson Education, 4/e, 2006 V.L. Streeter and E.B. Wylie, “Fluid Mechanics”, Tata McGraw Hill Massey B S, Mechanics of Fluids, Van Nostrand Reinhold Co
    • ELECTRONICSCourse Code: BTM 306 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:Basic knowledge of Electronics is very essential for an engineer, it will help in build ing up the electronics &automation skills in Mechanical Engineers.Course Contents:Module IReview of Diodes LED, Zener and Tunnel Diode and their characteristics, Applications of diodes -Rectifiers(Half and full wave, Bridge).Module IIBJT-construction and characteristics, Transistor as an amplifier, CE, CB and CC configurat ions, Introduction toMOSFET.Module IIICoupling, RC coupled Amplifiers, Transformer coupling,, Introduction to feedback-Positive and negative,Introduction to oscillators.Module IVIntroduction to OPAMP characteristics and specifications, OPAMP as adder, subtractor. Integrator,differentiator.Module VIntroduction to digital electronics, logic gates, basic laws and theorems of Boolean algebra, Introduct ion toCo mbinational Circuits, Concept of memo ry cell and introduction to Flip-flops R S, J K, D and T.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: Boylestead & Neshlesky, “Electronics Dev ices & Circuits”. PHI Millman & Halkias, “Integrated Electronics”, TMH.References: Schilling & Belove “Electronics”. R P Jain, Dig ital Electronics.
    • MECHANICS OF SOLIDS AND FLUIDS LABCourse Code: BTM 320 Credit Units: 01Course Contents:Experimental work will be based on the following papers:Mechanics of SolidsFlu id MechanicsList of Experime nts:MECHANICS OF SOLIDS LAB1. Universal Testing Machine2. Tensile Test (MS)3. Double Shear Test (MS)4. Co mpression Test (CI)5. Brinell Hardness No.6. Izod Impact7. Testing Machine8. Rockwell Hardness Tester9. Spring St iffness (Spring Co mpression Testing machine)10. Torsion testing machineFLUID MECHANICS LAB1. Verification of Bernoulli‟s Theorem2. Experiment using Venturimeter3. Determination of coefficient of Discharge Cd , Cc, C! Using4. Circular/triangular/rectangular orifice5. To find major head losses in a pipe line6. To find minor head losses in a pipe line (sudden expansion/contraction/bend)Examination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.
    • MACHINE DRAWING LABCourse Code: BTM 321 Credit Units: 01Course Contents:Free-Hand Sketching & Shaft Scale DrawingCo mponents like cotter joint, knuckle joint; rivets and riveted joints ; couplings; flywheels, pulleys, bushbearings, Engine parts. Isometric v iews fro m Orthographic Pro jections of Machine Co mponents.Examination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.Text & References: Pohit, G and Gosh, G., Machine Drawing with Auto CAD, Pearson Education, 2007 PS Gill, Machine Drawing, S. Chand. ND Bhatt, Machine Drawing, Charotar publications N Sidheshwar, Machine Drawing , Tata McGraw Hill CL Tanta, Mechanical Drawing , “Dhanpat Rai”
    • PROGRAMMING LAB – I (NUMERICAL ANALYSIS)Course Code: BTM 322 Credit Units: 01Software Required: Turbo C/C++Course Contents:Assignments will be provided for the following:1. Analysis of various numerical and statistical techniquesExamination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.
    • ELECTRONICS LABCourse Code: BTM 323 Credit Units: 01Course Contents:List of Experime nts :1. To study the VI characteristic of a diode.2. To study Zener breakdown.3. To study the characteristics of a CE Transistor.4. To study the VI characteristic of CB &CC Transistor5. To study transistor as an a amp lifiers6. To study the Truth Table of Un iversal gates7. To study OP A mp. As inverting and non-inverting Amp.8. To study OP A mp in open loop and close loop.Examination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.
    • COMMUNICATION SKILLS - ICourse Code: BTM 341 Credit Units: 01Course Objective:To form written co mmunication strategies necessary in the workplaceCourse Contents:Module I: Introduction to Writing SkillsEffective Writing SkillsAvoiding Co mmon ErrorsParagraph Writ ingNote TakingWriting AssignmentsModule II: Letter Wri tingTypesFormatsModule IIIMemoAgenda and MinutesNotice and CircularsModule IV: Repor t Writi ngPurpose and Scope of a ReportFundamental Principles of Report WritingProject Report WritingSummer Internship ReportsExamination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 CAF V GD GP AWeightage (% ) 20 20 25 10 10 10 5CAF – Co mmun ication Assessment FileGD – Group DiscussionGP – Group PresentationText & References: Business Co mmunication, Raman – Prakash, Oxford Creat ive English for Co mmun ication, Krishnaswamy N, Macmillan Textbook of Business Co mmunication, Ramaswami S, Macmillan Working in Eng lish, Jones, Cambridge A Writers Workbook Fourth edition, Smo ke, Camb ridge Effective Writing, W ithrow, Camb ridge Writing Skills, Coe/Rycroft/ Ernest, Cambridge Welcome!, Jones, Camb ridge
    • BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCE - III (INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION)Course Code: BTM 343 Credit Units: 01Course Objective:This course provides practical guidance on Enhancing personal effectiveness and performance through effective interpersonal communicat ion Enhancing their conflict management and negotiation skillsCourse Contents:Module I: Interpersonal Communicati on: An IntroductionImportance of Interpersonal Co mmun icationTypes – Self and Other OrientedRapport Bu ild ing – NLP, Co mmun ication ModeSteps to improve Interpersonal Co mmun icationModule II: Behavioural Communicati onMeaning and Nature of behavioural co mmunicationPersuasion, Influence, Listening and QuestioningGu idelines for developing Hu man Co mmun ication skillsRelevance of Behavioural Co mmunication for personal and professional developmentModule III: Interpersonal StylesTransactional AnalysisLife Position/Script AnalysisGames AnalysisInteractional and Transactional StylesModule IV: Conflict ManagementMeaning and nature of conflictsStyles and techniques of conflict managementConflict management and interpersonal communicat ionModule V: Negotiation SkillsMeaning and Negotiation approaches (Traditional and Contemporary)Process and strategies of negotiationsNegotiation and interpersonal communicat ionModule VI: End-of-Semester AppraisalViva based on personal journalAssessment of Behavioural change as a result of train ingExit Level Rating by Self and ObserverExamination Scheme:Components SAP A Mi d Term VIVA Journal for Test (CT) Success (JOS)Weightage (% ) 20 05 20 30 25Text & References: Vangelist L. Anita, Mark N. Knapp, Inter Personal Communicat ion and Human Relationships: Third Ed ition, Allyn and Bacon Julia T. Wood. Interpersonal Co mmun ication everyday encounter Simons, Christine, Nay lor, Belinda: Effective Co mmunicat ion for Managers, 1997 1 st Edit ion Cassel Goddard, Ken: Informative Writing, 1995 1st Edit ion, Cassell Harvard Business School, Effective Co mmunication: Un ited States of America Foster John, Effective Writing Skills: Volu me -7, First Edit ion 2000, Institute of Public Relat ions (IPR) Beebe, Beebe and Red mond; Interpersonal Co mmunicat ion, 1996; A llyn and Bacon Publishers.
    • FRENCH - IIICourse Code: BTM 344 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:To provide the students with the know-how To master the current social commun ication skills in oral and in written. To enrich the formu lations, the linguistic tools and vary the sentence construction without repetition.Course Contents:Module B: pp. 76 – 88 Unité 6Module C: pp. 89 to103 Unité 7Contenu lexical: Uni té 6: se faire plaisir 1. acheter : exp rimer ses choix, décrire un objet (forme, d imension, poids et mat ières) payer 2. parler de la nourriture, deu x façons d‟exprimer la quantité, commander un repas au restaurant 3. parler des différentes occasions de faire la fête Unité 7 : Culti ver ses relations 1. maîtriser les actes de la co mmunication sociale courante (Salutations, présentations, invitations, remerciements) 2. annoncer un événement, exprimer un souhait, remercier, s‟excuser par écrit. 3. caractériser une personne (aspect physique et caractère)Contenu grammatical: 1. accord des adjectifs qualificatifs 2. articles partitifs 3. Négations avec de, ne…rien/personne/plus 4. Questions avec combien, quel… 5. expressions de la quantité 6. ne…plus/toujours - encore 7. pronoms co mpléments directs et indirects 8. accord du participe passé (auxiliaire « avoir ») avec l‟ob jet direct 9. Impérat if avec un pronom co mplément direct ou indirect 10. construction avec « que » - Je crois que/ Je pense que/ Je sais queExamination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: le livre à suivre: Campus: To me 1
    • GERMAN - IIICourse Code: BTM 345 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:To enable the students to converse, read and write in the language with the help of the basic rules of grammar,which will later help them to strengthen their language.To give the students an insight into the culture, geography, political situation and economic opportunitiesavailable in GermanyCourse Contents:Module I: Modal verbsModal verbs with conjugations and usageImparting the finer nuances of the languageModule II: Information about Germany (ongoi ng)Information about Germany in the form of p resentations or “Referat”– neighbors, states and capitals, importantcities and towns and characteristic features of the same, and also a few other topics related to Germany.Module III: Dati ve caseDative case, comparison with accusative caseDative case with the relevant articlesIntroduction to 3 different kinds of sentences – nominative, accusative and dativeModule IV: Dati ve personal pronounsNo minative, accusative and dative pronouns in comparisonModule V: Dati ve prepositionsDative preposition with their usage both theoretical and figurative useModule VI: Di aloguesIn the Restaurant,At the Tourist Informat ion Office,A telephone conversationModule VII: Directi onsNames of the direct ionsAsking and telling the direct ions with the help of a roadmapModule VIII: Conjuncti onsTo assimilate the knowledge of the conjunctions learnt indirectly so farExamination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: Wolfgang Hieber, Lern ziel Deutsch Hans-Heinrich Wangler, Sprachkurs Deutsch Schulz Griesbach, Deutsche Sprachlehre für Ausländer P.L Aneja, Deutsch Interessant- 1, 2 & 3 Rosa-Maria Dallap iazza et al, Tangram A ktuell A1/1,2 Braun, Nieder, Sch möe, Deutsch als Fremdsprache 1A, Grundkurs
    • SPANISH – IIICourse Code: BTM 346 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:To enable students acquire knowledge of the Set/definite expressions (idio mat ic expressions) in Spanishlanguage and to handle some Spanish situations with ease.Course Contents:Module IRevision of earlier semester modulesSet expressions (idio matic exp ressions) with the verb Tener, Poner, Ir….WeatherModule IIIntroduction to Gustar…and all its forms. Rev ision of Gustar and usage of itModule IIITranslation of Spanish-English; English-Spanish. Practice sentences.How to ask for directions (using estar)Introduction to IR + A + INFINITIVE FORM OF A VERBModule IVSimp le conversation with help of texts and vocabularyEn el restauranteEn el institutoEn el aeropuertoModule VReflexivesExamination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: Español, En Directo I A Español Sin Fronteras -Nivel Elemental
    • JAPANESE - IIICourse Code: BTM 347 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:To enable the students to converse in the language with the help of basic verbs and to express themselveseffectively and narrate their everyday short encounters. Students are also given projects on Japan and Japaneseculture to widen their horizon further.Note: The Japanese script is introduced in this semester.Course Contents:Module I: VerbsDifferent forms of verbs: present continuos verbs etcModule IIMore Adverbs and adverbial expressionsModule III: CountersLearn ing to count different shaped objects,Module IV: TensesPast tense, Past continuous tense.Module V: ComparisonCo mparative and Superlative degreeModule VI: Wishes and desiresExp ressing desire to buy, hold, possess. Usage in negative sentences as well.Co mparative degree, Superlat ive degree.Module VII: AppointmentOver phone, formal and in formal etc.Learning Outcome Students can speak the language and can describe themselves and situations effectively They also gain great knowledge in terms of Japanese lifestyle and culture, which help them at the time of placements.Methods of Private study /Self help Handouts, audio-aids, and self-do assignments. Use of library, visiting and watching movies in Japan and culture center every Friday at 6p m.Examination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References:Text: Teach yourself JapaneseReferences: Shin Nihongo no kiso 1
    • CHINESE – IIICourse Code: BTM 348 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:Foreign words are usually imported by translating the concept into Chinese, the emphasis is on the meaningrather than the sound. But the system runs into a problem because the underlying name of personal name isoften obscure so they are almost always transcribed according to their pronciation alone. The course aims atfamiliarizing the student with the basic aspects of speaking ability of Mandarin, the language of MainlandChina. The course aims at train ing students in practical skills and nurturing them to interact with a Ch ineseperson.Course Contents:Module IDrillsDialogue practiceObserve picture and answer the question.Introduction of written characters.Practice reading aloudPractice using the language both by speaking and by taking notes.Character writing and stroke orderModule IIMeasure wordsPosition words e.g. inside, outside, middle, in front, behind, top, bottom, side, left, right, straight.Directional words – beibian, xib ian, nanbian, dongbian, zhongjian.Our school and its different building locations.What game do you like?Difference between “hii” and “neng”, “keyi”.Module IIIChanging affirmat ive sentences to negative ones and vice versaHu man body parts.Not feeling well words e.g.; fever, co ld, stomach ache, head ache.Use of the modal particle “le”Making a telephone callUse of “jiu” and “cal” (Grammar portion)Automobiles e.g. Bus, train, boat, car, bike etc.Traveling, by train, by airplane, by bus, on the bike, by boat.. etc.Module IVThe ordinal nu mber “d i”“Mei” the demonstrative pronoun e.g. mei tian, mei nian etc.use of to enter to exitStructural particle “de” (Co mp liment of degree).Go ing to the Park.Description about class schedule during a week in school.Grammar use of “li” and “cong”.Co mprehension reading followed by questions.Module VPersuasion-Please don‟t smoke.Please speak slowlyPraise – This pictorial is very beautifulOpposites e.g. Clean-Dirty, Litt le-More, Old-New, Young-Old, Easy-Difficu lt, Boy-Girl, Black-White, Big-Small, Slow-Fast … etc.Talking about studies and classmatesUse of “it doesn‟t matter”Enquiring about a student, description about study method.Grammar: Negation of a sentence with a verbal pred icate.
    • Examination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: “Elementary Chinese Reader Part I, Part-2” Lesson 21-30
    • TERM PAPERCourse Code: BTM 330 Credit Units: 02GUIDELINES FOR TERM PAPERA term (or research) paper is primarily a record of intelligent articulation through several sources on a particulartopic of a given subject.The students will choose the topic at the beginning of the session in consultation with the facultyassigned/chosen. The progress of the paper will be monitored regularly by the faculty. At the end of thesemester the detailed paper on the topic will be submitted to the faculty assigned/chosen. The evaluation will bedone by Board of examiners comp rising of the facu lties.The procedure for writ ing a term paper may consists of the following steps:1. Choosing a topic2. Finding sources of material3. Collecting the notes4. Outlin ing the paper5. Writing the first draft6. Ed iting & preparing the final paper1. Choosing a TopicThe topic chosen should not be too general. Student will normally consult the faculty guide while finalizing thetopic.Finding Sources of material The material sources should be not more than 5 years old unless the nature of the paper is such that it involves examin ing older writings fro m a historical po int of view. Begin by making a list of subject-headings under which you might expect the topics to be listed. The sources could be books and magazines articles, news stories, periodicals, journals, internet etc.Collecting the notesSkim through sources, locate the useful material, make notes of it, including quotes and informat ion forfootnotes. Get facts, not just opinions. Co mpare the facts with authors conclusion(s)/recommendations. In research studies, notice the methods and procedures, results & conclusions. Check cross references.Outlining the paper Review notes to find main sub-divisions of the topic. Sort the collected material again under each main d ivision to find sub -sections for outline so that it begins to look more coherent and takes on a definite structure. If it does not, try going back and sorting again for main div isions, to see if another general pattern is possible.Writing the first draftWrite the paper around the outline, being sure that you indicate in the first part of the paper what its purpose is.You may follow the following: statement of purpose/objectives main body of the paper statement of summary and possible conclusion(s)/recommendationsAvoid short, bumpy telegraphic sentences and long straggling sentences with more than one main ideas.Editing & preparing the final papera) Before writ ing a term paper, you should ensure you have an issue(s) which you attempt to address in yourpaper and this should be kept in mind throughout the paper. Include only informat ion/ details/ analyses that arerelevant to the issue(s) at hand. Sometimes, the relevance of a particu lar section may be clear to you but not toyour readers. To avoid this, ensure that you briefly exp lain the relevance of every section.b) Read the paper to ensure that the language is not awkward, and that it "flows" smoot hly.c) Check for proper spelling, phrasing and sentence construction.d) Check for proper form on footnotes, quotes, and punctuation.e) Check to see that quotations serve one of the follo wing purposes: (i) Show evidence of what an author has said.
    • (ii) Avoid misrepresentation through restatement. (iii) Save unnecessary writing when ideas have been well exp ressed by the original author.f) Check for proper form on tables and graphs. Be certain that any table or graph is self-exp lanatory.Term papers shoul d be composed of the following sections:1) Title page2) Abstract3) Introduction4) Review of the Literature5) Discussion & Conclusion6) References7) AppendixGenerally, the introduction, discussion, conclusion and references should account for a third of the paper and thereview part should be two thirds of the paper.DiscussionThe discussion section either follo ws the results or may alternatively be integrated in the results section. Thesection should consist of a discussion of the results of the study focusing on the question posed in the paper.ConclusionThe conclusion is often thought of as the easiest part of the paper but should by no means be disregarded. Thereare a nu mber of key co mponents which should not be omitted. These include:a) summary of object ives and issues raised.b) summary of findingsc) summary of limitations of the study at handd) details of possibilities for related future researchReferencesFro m the very beginning of the research work, one should be careful to note all details of articles or any othermaterial gathered. The Reference part should list ALL references included in the paper. References not includedin the text in any form should NOT be listed here. The key issue here is consistency. Choose a particularconvention and stick to this.ConventionsMonographsCrystal, D. (2001), Language and the internet. Cambridge: Cambridge Un iversity Press.Edited vol umesGass, S./Neu, J. (eds.) (1996), Speech acts across cultures. Challenges to communication in a second language.Berlin/ NY: Mouton de Gruyter.[(eds.) is used when there is more than one editor; and (ed.) where there is only one editor. In German theabbreviation used is (Hrsg.) for Herausgeber].Edited articlesSchmidt, R./Sh imura, A./Wang, Z./Jeong, H. (1996), Suggestions to buy: Television co mmercials fro m the U.S.,Japan, China, and Korea. In: Gass, S./Neu, J. (eds.) (1996), Speech acts across cultures. Challenges tocommunication in a second language. Berlin/ NY: Mouton de Gruyter: 285-316.Journal articlesMcQuarrie, E.F./M ick, D.G. (1992), On resonance: A critical pluralistic inquiry into advertising rhetoric.Journal of consumer research 19, 180-197.Electronic bookChandler, D. (1994), Semiotics for beginners [HTM L document]. Retrieved [5.10.01] fro m the World WideWeb, http://www.aber.ac.u k/ media/Docu ments/S4B/.Electronic journal articlesWatts, S. (2000) Teaching talk: Should students learn real German? [HTM L document]. German as a ForeignLanguage Journal [online] 1. Retrieved [12.09.00] fro m the World Wide Web, http://www.gfl-journal.co m/.Other websitesVerterhus, S.A. (n.y.), Anglicisms in German car advertising. The problem o f gender assignment [HTM Ldocument]. Retrieved [13.10.01] fro m the World Wide Web, http://olaf.hiof.no/~sverrev/eng.html.
    • Unpublished papersTakahashi, S./ DuFon, M.A. (1989), Cross -linguistic influence in indirectness: The case of English direct ivesperformed by native Japanese speakers. Unpublished paper, Department of Eng lish as a Second Language,University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu.Unpublished theses/ dissertationsMöhl, S. (1996), Alltagssituationen im interkulturellen Verg leich : Realisierung von Kritik und Ablehnung imDeutschen und Englischen. Unpublished MA thesis, University of Hamburg.Walsh, R. (1995), Language development and the year abroad: A study of oral grammat ical accuracy amongstadult learners of German as a foreign language. Unpublished PhD Dissertation, University College Dublin.Appendi xThe appendix should be used for data collected (e.g. questionnaires, transcripts etc.) and for tables and graphsnot included in the main text due to their subsidiary nature or to sp ace constraints in the main text.The Layout Gui delines for the Term Paper A4 size Paper Font: Arial (10 points) or Times New Ro man (12 points) Line spacing: 1.5 Top and bottom marg ins: 1 inch/ 2.5 cm; left and right margins: 1.25 inches/ 3 cmAssessment Sche me:Continuous Eval uation: 40%(Based on abstract writing, interim draft, general approach,research orientation, readings undertaken etc.)Final Evaluati on: 60%(Based on the organization of the paper, objectives/problem profile/ issue outlining, co mprehensiveness of theresearch, flo w of the idea/ ideas, relevance of material used/presented, outcomes vs. objectives, presentation/ viva etc.)
    • KINEMATICS AND DYNAMICS OF MACHINESCourse Code: BTM 401 Credit Units: 04Course Objective:The objective of this course is to identify the alternatives to satisfy the needs of the customer and to quantify andevaluate the alternatives. It includes an introduction to the study of motion of constrained mechanism inmach ine systems. The objective is to develop the students understanding of basic mach ine design . Concepts,such as linkages, cams, sliders, crank and rocker, offset crank slider etc. The combination of several of theseelements in machine drive trains and the resulting static and dynamic forces will also be studied. This coursealso includes study of forces, motion and inertia in machines, analysis of lin kages, cams, rotor dynamics,reciprocal and rotational balancing.Course Contents:Module I: General Concepts, Vel ocity and Accelerati on Anal ysisIntroduction to simp le mechanis ms, different types of kinematics pairs, Grubler‟s rule for degrees of freedo m,Grashof‟s criterion for mobility determination, Inversions of 3R-P, 2R-2P chains, Kinematics analysis of planarmechanis m. Instantaneous center method for analysis three center in line theorem, concept of rotating referenceframe and its application for Corio lis accelerationModule II: Fricti onThread friction, pivot and collar friction, clutches, belt and ro pe drives, frict ion axis, friction circle;Module III: CamsClassification, Cams with uniform acceleration and retardation, SHM, Cy lclo idal mot ion, oscillating fo llo wers .Module IV: GearsGeo metry of tooth profiles, Law of gearing, involutes profile, interference, helical, spiral and worm gears,simp le, co mpound gear trains. Ep icyclic gear trains – Analysis by tabular and relative velocity method, fixingtorque.Module V: Vi brati onsVibrat ion analysis of SDOF systems, natural, damped, forced vibration s, base-excited vibrations,transmissibility ratio.Module VI: Dynamic AnalysisSlider-crank mechanism, turning mo ment co mputationBalancing: Static and dynamic balancing, balancing of revolving and reciprocating masses, single and multi-cylinder engines.Module VII: GyroscopesGy roscopic law, effect of gyroscopic couple on automobiles, ships, aircrafts.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References: PL Ballaney, Theory of Machines, Hams Crone and Roggers, Theory of Machines Shigley, Theory of Machines J. Lal, Theory of Machines SS Rattan, Theory of Machines Ghosh and Mallick, Mechanisms and Machines, EWP publication. R.S. Khurmi, Theory of Machine, S. Chand.
    • HEAT AND MASS TRANSFERCourse Code: BTM 402 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:The main objective of the course to understand the behavio ur of thermal systems. To illustrate the developmentof the governing differential, algebraic and finite difference equations associated with thermal systems. Tointroduce the possible methods of solution to the governing equation. To investigate the influences of boundaryand initial conditions and system parameters on the resulting steady or transient response of the system. Toprovide the basic tools those are used in thermal system design. To expose students to heat transfer applicationsin industry.Course Contents:Module IOne-dimensional steady-state conduction through homogeneous and composite plane walls, cylinders andspheres, critical thickness of insulation; heat transfer fro m fins of uniform cross section.Module IIConcept of hydrodynamic and thermal boundary layers, momentu m and energy equation for boundary layers ona flat p late applicat ion of dimensional analysis to free and force convection; important dimensionless number.Module IIIThermal radiation; Kirchoff‟s law; Planck‟s distribution law, Wien‟s displacement law; Stefan-Bolt zmann‟srelation, Configuration factors; radiant interchange between black and grey surfaces; radiation shielding solarradiation.Module IVCo mbined heat transfer analysis; overall heat transfer co-efficient; types of heat exchangers; LMTD methods ofheat exchanger design; simple heat exchanger calculations.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References: Incropera, F.P. and DeWitt, D.P. (2002). Fundamentals of Heat and Mass Transfer, John Willy & Sons, New York, NY. Nag, P.K. (2002). Heat and Mass Transfer, TMH. John R.Ho well & Richrd O Buckius, Fundamentals of Engg. Thermodynamics, McGraw Hill International. Holman, J.P. (1997). Heat Transfer, 9th edition, McGraw-Hill. Mills, A.F. (1999). Basic Heat and Mass Transfer. Prentice -Hall. Thiru maleshwar, M. (2006). Fundamentals of Heat and Mass Transfer, Pearson education. Ghoshdastidar, P.S. (2004). Heat Transfer. Oxford University Press. Arora, Do mkundwar, S. and Do mkundwar, A. (1988). A Course in Heat & Mass Transfer, Dhanpat Rai & Co.
    • MANUFACTURING MACHINESCourse Code: BTM 403 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:This is a new develop mental graduate course for students interested in learning how to design, analyze and buildspecialty manufacturing process machines. It anticipated that this course would become part of the newmanufacturing emphasis area in mechanical engineering.Course Contents:Module I: Introduction to Machine ToolsClassification of machine tools, kinds of motion in machine tool operations, definit ion of cutting speed, feed anddepth of cut.Module II: LatheClassification and various parts of Lathe, specificat ion, Description of important mechanism viz. apron, tailstock, head stock, work holding, devices and operations, e.g. taper, turning, eccentric turning and screw-cutting,Geo metry of a single point cutting tool. Calculat ion of machin ing time, Capstan and turret latheModule III: Drilling MachineGeo metry and nomenclature of a twist drill, specification and classification of drilling machines, cutting speed,feed, depth of cut and calculation machin ing time in drilling, tool holding devices, different types of operationsperformed on a drilling machine.Module IV: Milling MachineClassification, up milling and down milling, dividing Head, different types of operations – simple, co mpoundand differential indexing, slab milling, spiral milling, slot milling, T-slot milling and end milling.Module V: Shaper, Slotter & Pl annerPrincipal part of a shaper, classification, Qu ick Return mechanism, table feed mechanism of a shaper,Operations, e.g. horizontal, vertical and inclined shaping, difference between a shaper, planer and slotter, cuttingspeed, feed, and depth of cut and calculation of machining time in shaping.Module VI: Grindi ng MachinesConstruction and specification of a grinding wheel, wheel turning and dressing, Grinding machines surf ace,cylindrical and center less grinding.Module VII: S pecial MachinesHorizontal and vertical boring machines, Gear Geo metry, Gear generation and hobbing; Lapping, honing andsuper fin ishing processes.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: P.N. Rao, “Manufacturing Technology: Metal Cutting & Machine Tools”, Tata McGraw Hill, Delh i, 2004. B.S. Raghuwanshi, “Workshop Technology”, Vo l.2, Dhanpat Rai & Sons, 2003. Hazra Chandhari S.K., “Elements of Workshop Technology”, Vol.2, Media Pro moters, 2003.References: P.C. Sharma, “A Text Book of Production. Eng ineering”, S. Chand, New Delh i, 2004. Bawa H.S., “Workshop Technology”, Vol.2, Tata McGraw Hill, 2004. Juneja & Shekhon, “Fundamental o f Metal Cutting”, New Age Publications S.F. Krar Stevan F. and Check A.F., “Technology of M/C Tools”, McGraw Hill Book Co., 1986. Kibbe Richard et al, “M/c Tool practices”, Prentice Hall India, 2003. Bangalore HMT, “Production Technology”, Tata McGraw Hill, 1980. R.K. Jain, “Production Technology”, Khanna Publishers Gerling Heinrich, “A ll about Machine Tools”, New Age Publication, 2003.
    • THEORY OF METAL FORMINGCourse Code: BTM 404 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:The objective of this course is to introduce the fundamentals of basic manufacturing processes (solidificationprocess, heat treatment, deformation processes, material removal processes, and joining processes). The studentsare expected to be able to select, analyze and design basic manufacturing processes for product development.Course Contents:Module I: IntroductionReview of tensile test, True stress and true strain, Yield ing criteria for ductile metals, Yield locus, Plastic stress -strain relations-Levy mises equation, prandtl-Reuss equations.Module II: Pl astic deformationCrystal Geo metry, Lattice defects, Deformation by slip, Shear Stress required to cause slip in a perfect Crystal,Deformat ion by twinning, Fracture, Types of Fracture, Creep Failure.Module III: Introducti on to metal workingClassification of metal working processes -Cold working, Hot working, Effect of variables on metal wo rkingprocesses, Methods of Analysis of metal working processes.Module IV: ForgingClassification of Forging Processes, Forging equipment, Open die forging, Closed die forging, Load calculationin Plane strain forg ing, Forg ing defects.Module V: RollingRolling Mills, Hot rolling, Cold rolling, Forces and Geo metrical Relationships in Rolling, Ro lling load &torque, rolling defects.Module VI: ExtrusionMethods of Extrusion, Hot Extrusion, Cold Extrusion, Analysis of Extrusion processes, Effect of Variables onExtrusion pressure, Extrusion defects.Module VII: Sheet metal formingForming Methods, Forming Operations -Shearing, Blan king, Bending, Stretch Forming, Deep Drawing, Stressesdeveloped in Deep Drawing, Defects in Formed Parts.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References: Mechanical Metallurgy by Geo rge E. Dieter: Mc Graw-Hill Book Co mpany Metal working by Surinder Ku mar, Dhanpat Rai & Sons
    • ELECTRICAL MACHINESCourse Code: BTM 405 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:Electrical Machines provides the backbone for successful and uninterrupted smooth functioning of any industry.Knowledge of this subject in any engineering branch is vital in process industry. The course covers themach ines e.g. Motors & generators characteristics and classifications related to mechanical & automat ion aswell as recent development engineering applications. Successful completion of this course will be very helpfulfor the students who wish to join challenging industry.Course Contents:Module IIntroduction to Subject, Some impo rtant fundamentals, Electrical Po wer generation, Utilizat ion & distributionfacts & figures. Simp le Loop Generator, D C Machines, Construction Features, Principle of Operat ion.Module IIDC Generator Analysis & DC Motor, Classification & Characteristics & Analysis. Speed TorqueCharacteristics, Speed control of D C Motor. Application of D C Motor. Starters.Module IIIA C Machines, 3 phase IM, Revolving Magnetic field theory, IM as a transformer, Equivalent Circuit. 3 phaseSynchronous Machines, Synchronous Motor, Synchronous Generator, Equivalent Ckt.Module IVSingle phase Induction Motor, Double Revolving Field theory, Different types of 3 phase IM.Characteristics & typical Applications. Fractional Kilo Watt Hour Motor, Stepper Motor, Hysterisis Motor, A CSeries Motors, Universal Motors.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: I J Nagrath & D P Kothari. “Electrical Machines”. TMH Irvin Kosow, “Electrical Machines & Transformers”, PHI.References: B L Theraja “Electrical Engineering”.
    • PRINCIPLES OF COMPUTER GRAPHICSCourse Code: BTM 406 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:The objective of the course is to provide the understanding of the fundamental graphical operations and theimplementation on computer, the mathematics behind computer graphics, including the use of spline curves andsurfaces. It gives the glimpse of recent advances in comp uter graphics, user interface issues that make thecomputer easy, for the novice to use.Course Contents:Module I: Introduction to Graphics and Graphics Hardware SystemVideo display devices, CRT, LCD Display devices Raster scan displays, Random scan displays, Raster scansystems, Random scan Systems.Input devices, keyboard, mouse, Trackball and spaceball, Joystick, Data glove, Digit izers, Image scanners,Touch panels, Light pens, Vo ice systems.Hardcopy devices, Printers, Plotters.Module II: Output Pri miti ves and Cli ppi ng operationsAlgorith ms for drawing 2D Primit ives lines (DDA and Bresenham‟s line algorith m),circles (bresenham‟s andmidpoint circle algorithm),ellipses(midpoint ellipse algorith m),other curves(conic sections, polynomials andspline curves).Antialiasing and filtering techniquesLine clipping (cohen-sutherland algorithm), clip windows, circles, ellipses, polygon, clipping with SutherlandHodgeman algorith m.Module III: Geometric transformation2D Transformation: Basic t ransformat ion, Translation, Rotation, scaling, Matrix Representations andHo mogeneous coordinates, window to viewport transformat ion.3D Concepts: Parallel p rojection and Perspective projection, 3D Transformation.Module IV: 3D object Representati on, Colour models and renderingPolygon meshes in 3D, Spheres, Ellipsoid, Bezier curves and Bezier surfaces, Bspline curves and surfaces, solidmodeling, sweep representation, constructive solid geometry methods. Achromatic and color models.Shading ,rendering techniques and visible surface detection method: Basic illu mination, d iffuse reflect ion,specular reflection. Polygon rendering method, Gouraud & Phong shading. Depth-buffer method, A-buffermethod, Depth-sorting method(painter‟s algorithm).Module V: Introducti on to mul timedi aFile formats for BMP, GIF, TIFF, IPEG, M PEG-II, Animation techniques and languages.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: Foley et. al., “Co mputer Graphics Principles & pract ice”, 2nd ed. AWL., 2000. D. Hearn and P. Baker, “Co mputer Graphics”, Prentice Hall, 1986. R. Plastock and G. Kalley, “Theory and Problems of Computer Graphics ”, Schaum‟s Series, McGraw Hill, 1986References: R.H. Bartels, J.C. Beatty and B.A. Barsky, “An Introduction to Splines for use in Co mputer Graphics and Geo metric Modeling”, Morgan Kaufmann Publishers Inc., 1987. C.E. Leiserson, T.H. Cormen and R.L. Rivest, “Introduction to Algorithms”, McGraw-Hill Book Co mpany, 1990. W. Newman and R. Sproul, “Principles of Interactive Co mputer Graphics, McGraw-Hill, 1973.
    •  F.P. Preparata and M.I. Shamos, “Co mputational Geo metry : An Introduction”, Springer-Verlag New Yo rk Inc., 1985. D. Rogers and J. Adams, “Mathematical Ele ments for Co mputer Graphics”, McGraw-Hill International Ed ition, 1989 David F. Rogers, “Procedural Elements for Co mputer Graphics”, McGraw Hill Book Co mpany, 1985. Alan Watt and Mark Watt, “Advanced Animation and Rendering Techniques”, Addison-Wesley, 1992
    • KINEMATICS AND DYNAMICS OF MACHINES LABCourse Code: BTM 420 Credit Units: 01Course Contents:List of Experime nts:1. To study inversion of 3 R-IP Kinematics chain2. To study inversions of 2R-2P Kinematics Chain3. To carry out computer implementable kinematics analysis of 4 R mechanisms4. To carry out computer implementable kinematics analysis of slider bar mechanis m5. To study gear box, clutch and differential gear6. To find coefficient of frict ion for clutch plate7. To determine gear ratio for an epicyclical gear train and verify it by analytical method8. To study different types of Cam follower systems9. To verify Gyroscopic Law10. To determine and verify the whirling speed of a shaft-disc system11. To determine the damp ing factor for a given horizontal v ibration set up12. To obtain dynamic balance for an unbalanced system with revolving massesExamination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.
    • MANUFACTURING MACHINES LABCourse Code: BTM 421 Credit Units: 01Course Contents:1. Operations on the Lathe Machine.2. Operations on the Shaper Machine.3. Operations on the Planner Machine.4. Operations on the Drilling Machine.5. Operations on the Grinding Machine.6. Operations on the Milling Machine.Examination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.
    • ELECTRICAL MACHINES LABCourse Code: BTM 422 Credit Units: 01Course Contents: S. NO. NAME OF THE EXPERIMENTS 1. Speed Control of DC Shunt Motor 2. To obtain magnetization characteristics of 1) Separately excited DC Generator 2) Shunt Generator 3. To obtain the load characteristics 1) DC Shunt Motor 2) Cu mu lative Co mpound generator 4. To conduct Swinburne Test on a DC. Shunt Motor and hence obtain its efficiency at fu ll load. 5. To perform No Load Test and blocked rotor test on a three phase Induction motor and hence determine its equivalent circuit parameters. 6. To perform load test on a three phase Induction Motor and obtain its various performance characteristics. 7. Retardation Test on a three phase induction motor and calculate its mo ment of inertia. 8. To perform No Load and Blocked Rotor Test on a single phase Induction motor and hence determine its equivalent circuit parameters. 9. To perform open circuit and short circuit test on a three phase alternator and hence determine its voltage regulation by synchronous Impedance Method. 10. To obtain V curves of a three phase synchronous motor at no load.Examination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.
    • PRINCIPLES OF COMPUTER GRAPHICS LABCourse Code: BTM 423 Credit Units: 01Software Required: Turbo C/C++Course Contents:Assignments will be provided for the following:1. Geo metrical shapes based on graphics algorithms2. 2D Geo metric transformation translation, rotation, scaling, reflect ion.3. Clipping4. Animat ionExamination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.
    • COMMUNICATION SKILLS - IICourse Code: BTM 441 Credit Units: 01Course Objective:To teach the participants strategies for imp roving academic read ing and writing.Emphasis is placed on increasing fluency, deepening vocabulary, and refin ing academic language proficiency.Course Contents:Module I: Social Communication SkillsSmall TalkConversational EnglishAppropriatenessBuilding rapportModule II: Context Based S peakingIn general situationsIn specific professional situationsDiscussion and associated vocabularySimu lations/Role PlayModule III: Professional SkillsPresentationsNegotiationsMeetingsTelephony SkillsExamination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 CAF V GD GP AWeightage (% ) 20 20 25 10 10 10 5CAF – Co mmun ication Assessment FileGD – Group DiscussionGP – Group PresentationText & References: Essential Telephoning in English, Garside/ Garside, Cambridge Working in Eng lish, Jones, Camb ridge Business Co mmunication, Raman – Prakash, Oxford Speaking Personally, Porter-Ladousse, Cambridge Speaking Effectively, Jermy Co mfort, et.al, Cambridge Business Co mmunication, Raman – Prakash, Oxford
    • BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCE - IV (RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT)Course Code: BTM 443 Credit Units: 01Course Objective:To understand the basis of interpersonal relat ionshipTo understand various communication styleTo learn the strategies for effective interpersonal relat ionshipCourse Contents:Module I: Understandi ng Rel ationshi psImportance of relationshipsRole and relat ionshipsMaintaining healthy relat ionshipsModule II: Bri dging Indi vi dual DifferencesUnderstanding individual d ifferencesBridging differences in Interpersonal Relat ionship – TACo mmunicat ion StylesModule III: Interpersonal Relationship DevelopmentImportance of Interpersonal RelationshipsInterpersonal Relat ionships SkillsTypes of Interpersonal RelationshipsModule IV: Theories of Interpersonal Relationshi psTheories: Social Exchange, Uncertainty Reduction TheoryFactors Affecting Interpersonal Relat ionshipsImproving Interpersonal RelationshipsModule V: Impression ManagementMeaning & Co mponents of Impression ManagementImpression Management Techniques (Influencing Skills)Impression Management Training-Self help and Formal approachesModule VI: End-of-Semester AppraisalViva based on personal journalAssessment of Behavioural change as a result of train ingExit Level Rating by Self and ObserverExamination Scheme:Components SAP A Mi d Term VIVA Journal for Test (CT) Success (JOS)Weightage (% ) 20 05 20 30 25Text & References: Vangelist L. Anita, Mark N. Knapp, Inter Personal Communicat ion and Human Relationships: Third Ed ition, Allyn and Bacon Julia T. Wood. Interpersonal Co mmun ication everyday encounter Simons, Christine, Nay lor, Belinda: Effective Co mmunicat ion for Managers, 1997 1st Edit ion Cassell Goddard, Ken: Informative Writing, 1995 1st Edit ion, Cassell Harvard Business School, Effective Co mmunication: Un ited States of America Foster John, Effective Writing Skills: Volu me -7, First Edit ion 2000, Institute of Public Relat ions (IPR) Beebe, Beebe and Red mond; Interpersonal Co mmunicat ion, 1996; A llyn and Bacon Publishers.
    • FRENCH - IVCourse Code: BTM 444 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:To enable students: To develop strategies of comprehension of texts of d ifferent orig in To present facts, projects, plans with precisionCourse Contents:Module C: pp. 104 – 139: Unités 8, 9Contenu lexical: Uni té 8: Découvrir le passé 1. parler du passé, des habitudes et des changements. 2. parler de la famille, raconter une suite d‟événements/préciser leur date et leur durée. 3. connaître quelques mo ments de l‟histoire Uni té 9: Entreprendre 1. faire un projet de la réalisation: (exp rimer un besoin, préciser les étapes d‟une réalisation) 2. parler d‟une entreprise 3. parler du futurContenu grammatical: 1. Imparfait 2. Pronom « en » 3. Futur 4. Discours rapporté au présent 5. Passé récent 6. Présent progressifExamination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: le livre à suivre : Campus: To me 1
    • GERMAN - IVCourse Code: BTM 445 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:To enable the students to converse, read and write in the language with the help of the basic rules of grammar,which will later help them to strengthen their language.To give the students an insight into the culture, geography, political situation and economic opportunitiesavailable in Germany.Introduction to Advanced Grammar Language and Professional JargonCourse Contents:Module I: Present perfect tensePresent perfect tense, usage and applicabilityUsage of this tense to indicate near pastUniversal applicability of this tense in GermanModule II: Letter writingTo acquaint the students with the form of writing info rmal letters.Module III: Interchanging prepositionsUsage of prepositions with both accusative and dative casesUsage of verbs fixed with prepositionsEmphasizing on the action and position factorModule IV: Past tenseIntroduction to simp le past tenseLearn ing the verb forms in past tenseMaking a list of all verbs in the past tense and the participle formsModule V: Reading a Fairy TaleCo mprehension and narration Rotkäppchen Froschprinzessin Die FremdspracheModule VI: Geni ti ve caseGenitive case – Exp lain the concept of possession in genitiveMentioning the structure of weak nounsModule VII: Geniti ve prepositionsDiscuss the genitive propositions and their usage: (während, wegen, statt, trotz)Module VIII: Picture Descri ptionFirstly recognize the persons or things in the picture and identify the situation depicted in th e picture;Secondly answer questions of general meaning in context to the picture and also talk about the personalexperiences which co me to your mind upon seeing the picture.Examination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: Wolfgang Hieber, Lern ziel Deutsch Hans-Heinrich Wangler, Sprachkurs Deutsch Schulz Griesbach, Deutsche Sprachlehre für Ausländer P.L Aneja, Deutsch Interessant - 1, 2 & 3 Rosa-Maria Dallap iazza et al, Tangram A ktuell A1/1,2 Braun, Nieder, Sch möe, Deutsch als Fremdsprache 1A, Grundkurs
    • SPANISH - IVCourse Code: BTM 446 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:To enable students acquire working knowledge of the language; to give them vocabulary, grammar, voicemodulations/intonations to handle everyday Spanish situations with ease.Course Contents:Module IRevision of eaSrlier semester modulesIntroduction to Present Continuous Tense (Gerunds)Module IITranslation with Present Continuous TenseIntroduction to Gustar, Parecer, Apetecer, dolerModule IIIImperatives (positive and negative commands of regular verbs)Module IVCo mmercial/business vocabularyModule VSimp le conversation with help of texts and vocabularyEn la recepcion del hotelEn el restauranteEn la agencia de viajesEn la t ienda/supermercadoExamination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: Español Sin Fronteras (Nivel – Elemental)
    • JAPANESE - IVCourse Code: BTM 447 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:To enable the students to comfortably interact using basic Japanese.Note: Teaching is done in ro man as well as Japanese script, students will be taught katankana (another form o fscript) in this semester i.e. to be able to write all the foreign words in Japanese.Course Contents:Module ICo mparison using adjectives, making requestsModule IISeeking permissionModule IIIPractice of conversations on:Visit ing people, Party, Meetings, after work, At a ticket vending machine etcModule IVEssays, writing formal lettersLearning Outcome Students can speak the language describing above-mentioned topics.Methods of Private study /Self help Handouts, audio-aids, and self-do assignments, role-plays. Students are also encouraged to attend Japanese film festival and other such fairs and workshops organized in the capital fro m t ime to time.Examination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References:Text: Teach yourself JapaneseReferences: Shin Nihongo no kiso 1
    • CHINESE – IVCourse Code: BTM 448 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:How many characters are there? The early Qing dynasty dictionary included nearly 50,000 characters the vastmajority of which were rare accu mulated characters over the centuries. An educate person in China canprobably recognize around 6000 characters. The course aims at familiarizing the student with the basic aspectsof speaking ability of Mandarin, the language of Mainland China. The course aims at training students inpractical skills and nurturing them to interact with a Chinese person.Course Contents:Module IDialogue PracticeObserve picture and answer the questionPronunciation and intonationCharacter writing and stroke order.Electronic itemsModule IITraveling – The Scenery is very beautifulWeather and climateGrammar question with – “bu shi …. Ma?”The construction “yao … le” (Used to indicate that an action is going to take place)Time words “yiqian”, “y iwai” (Before and after).The adverb “geng”.Module IIIGo ing to a friend house for a visit meeting his family and talking about their customs.Fallen sick and going to the Doctor, the doctor examines, takes temperature and writes prescription.Aspect particle “guo” shows that an action has happened some time in the past.Progressive aspect of an actin “zhengzai” A lso the use if “zhe” with it.To welco me someone and to see off someone …. I cant go the airport to see you off… etc.Module IVShip ment. Is this the place to checking luggage?Basic dialogue on – Where do u work?Basic dialogue on – This is my addressBasic dialogue on – I understand ChineseBasic dialogue on – What job do u do?Basic dialogue on – What time is it now?Module VBasic dialogue on – What day (date) is it today?Basic dialogue on – What is the weather like here.Basic dialogue on – Do u like Chinese food?Basic dialogue on – I am p lanning to go to China.Examination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: “Elementary Chinese Reader, Part-2” Lesson 31-38
    • MACHINE DESIGN - ICourse Code: BTM 501 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:The objective of this course is to help students apply concepts learned in the mechanics, structure, material andmanufacturing courses. This course offers working knowledge in the use of proper failure theories under steadyand variable loading, design of mechanical elements, such as shaft, coupling, power screws, and detachable,permanent and welded connections.Course Contents:Module I: Vari able stresses in Machi ne PartsFatigue and Endurance Limit, Factor of Safety for Fatigue Loading, Stress concentration, Notch sensitivity,Gerber Method, Good man Method and Soderberg Method for combination of stresses.Module II: Power ScrewsTypes of screw threads, Torque required to raise and lower the load, Efficiency of square threaded screw,overhauling and self locking screw, stresses in power screw, design of screw jeck.Module III: Cotter and Knuckle JointsTypes of cotter joints, design of socket and spigot joint, design of sleeve and cotter joint, design of jib and cotterjoint, Design procedure of Knuckle joint.Module IV: Ri veted and Wel ded JointTypes of Riveted joint, Lap joint , Butt Joint, Caulking and Fullering, Failure of Riveted joint, Strength ofRiveted joint, Efficiency of Riveted joint. Advantages and Disadvantages of welded joint over Riveted joint,Strength of Fillet jo int, strength of Butt joints.Module V: Keys and CouplingsTypes of Keys, Splines, Strength of Sunk Key, types of shaft coupling, Sleeve and muff coupling, Flangecoupling, Flexib le coupling, Oldham coupling, Universal coupling.Module VI: Dri vesTypes of Belt drives, Flat Belt drives, Velocity ratio, Sleep, Creep of Belt, Length of open Belt, length of crossbelt, power trans mission by belt, Maximu m tesion in the belt. Types of V belt and Pulleys, advantages anddisadvantages of V belt over Flat Belt, Rat io of Driv ing tensions for V belt, Rope drives. Chain drives,advantages and disadvantages of Chain drives.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References: J.E. Shig ley, Mechanical Eng ineering Design. Sadhu Singh, Machine Design R.S. Khurmi & J.K. Gupta, Machine design D.K. Aggarwal & P.C. Sharma, Machine Design
    • METROLOGYCourse Code: BTM 502 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:The main objective of this course is to give the student: a basic understanding of the physical loss governingmetro logy and tolerance design. Gain and appreciation for the capabilities and applications of metrologythrough hands own experiences.Course Contents:Module I: Princi ples of measurementDefinition of Metrology, difference between precision and accuracy. Sources of errors: Controllable andRandom Errors, Effects of Environment and Temperature, Effects of support, align ment errors.Length Standards: Line standards, end standards and wavelength standards, transfer from line standards to endstandards. Nu merical based on line standards. Slip gauges – its use and care, methods of building differentheights using different sets of slip gauges.Li mits, fits and tolerances: Various definitions, different types of fits and methods to provide these fits.Nu merical to calculate the limits, fits and tolerances, ISO system of limits and fits; Gauges and its types, limitgauges – plug and ring gauges. Gauge Design – Taylor‟s Principle, wear allowance on gauges.Module II: ComparatorsPrinciples and working of Mechanical, Electrical, Optical and Pneumat ic Co mparators.Angul ar Measurement: Sine Bar – different types of sine bars, use of sine bars in conjunction with slipgauges, Use of angle gauges, spirit level, erro rs in use of sine bars. Nu mericals. Principle and working ofautocollimator.Module III: Straightness and fl atnessDefinition of Straightness and Flatness error. Nu mericals based on determinatio n of straightness error of straightedge with the help of spirit level and auto collimatorScrew Thread Measurement: Errors in threads, Measurement of elements of screw threads –major d iameter,minor diameter, pitch, flank angle and effective diameter (Two and three wire methods). Effect of errors in pitchand flank anglesGear Measurement: Measurement of tooth thickness – Gear tooth vernier caliper, Constant chord method, basetangent method and derivation of mathemat ical formu lae for each method. Park inson Gear Tester.Module IVMachine Tool Alignment: Machine tool tests and alignment tests on lathe. Alignment tests on milling machine.Align ment tests on a radial drilling machine, Interfero metry.Surface texture: Introduction, types of irregularities, Elements of surfaceTexture, Measurement of surface finish, Examination of surface Roughness.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Se mester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: R.K. Jain, “Engineering Metrology”, Khanna Publishers, Delh i I.C. Gupta, “Engineering Metrology”, Dhanpat Rai Publications, Delh iReferences: F.W. Galyer & C.R. Shotbolt, “Metrology for Engineers”, ELBS ed ition.
    • MEASUREMENTS AND CONTROLSCourse Code: BTM 503 Credit Units: 04Course Objective:Knowledge of Measurement & Control in any engineering branch is vital in designing and industrialproduction/application. The course covers the characteristics and classifications of measurement related tomechanical & automat ion as well as recent development in measurement & control engineering applications.Successful comp letion of this course will be very helpfu l for the students who wish to join challenging industry.Course Contents:Module IIntroduction to generalized measurement system and their functional elements. Basic characteristics ofmeasuring devices, Standards & Calibrat ion. Accuracy, Precision, Sensitivity, Resolution, Linearity & Errors inmeasurement.Module IITransducers, Stages & their classificat ion, Resistive transducers, Strain gauges, Rosettes, Inductive transducers,Displacement measurement, LVDT.Module III: Applicati onsMiscellaneous instruments in Industrial & Env iron mental Applications, Measurement of viscosity & flow,Transient Time & Doppler‟s flow meter, Measurement of liquid level, hu mid ity, hair hygrometers.Module IVControl engineering applications, Introduction to type of control Systems, Open loop & close loop ControlSystems; Examp les & their block d iagrams. Transfer function, Stability of Control System, HurwitzPolynomial& Routh Hurwit z Criterian. Block diagram representation & reduction.Module V: Modes of Control & Controller MechanismP, PI and PID Controller. Pneumat ic & Hydraulic Controller, General Pr. of generating various Control Actions.Concept of Control Valves.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: Sawhney A. K 2000, “A course in Electrical & Electronics Measurement & Instrumentation”, Dhanpat Rai & Son‟s. B.C Nakra, K K Chaudhary. 2004,”Instrumentation, Measurement & A nalysis”. TMH. M Ogata, “Modern Control Engineering” PHI.References: H.S Kalsi, 1999, Electronic Instru mentation”, TMH. B. C Kuo, “Automat ic Control System”, Prentice Hall.
    • RELATIONAL DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMCourse Code: BTM 504 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:Database applications have grown enormously in nu mber and importance in the past two decades. They are usedto store, manipulate and retrieve data in nearly every type of organization. The applications are used byindividuals on PCs, by workgroups on network servers and by all emp loyees using enterprise -wide d istributedsystems. Database technology will assume even greater importance in the future due to the highly competit iveenvironment and the explosive use of the internet in Busin ess-to-Client and Business-to-Business applicationsand the need to store more data. That is why a course database management is a core course in the CS&ITcurriculu m.Course Contents:Module I: IntroductionConcept and goals of DBMS, Database Languages, Database Users, Database Abstraction.Basic Concepts of ER Model, Relationship sets, Keys, Mapping, Design of ER ModelModule II: Hierarchical model & Network ModelConcepts, Data definition, Data man ipulation and imp lementation.Network Data Model, DBTG Set Constructs, and Imp lementationModule III: Relational ModelRelational database, Relat ional Algebra, Relational & Tuple Calcu lus.Module IV: Rel ational Database Design and Query LanguageSQL, QUEL, QBE, No rmalizat ion using Functional Dependency, Multivalued dependency and Joindependency.Module V: Concurrency Control and New ApplicationsLock Based Protocols, Time Stamped Based Protocols, Deadlock Handling, Crash Recovery. DistributedDatabase, Objective Oriented Database, Multimed ia Database, Data Mining, Dig ital Libraries.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: Korth, Silberschatz, “Database System Concepts”, 4th Ed., TM H, 2000. Steve Bobrowski, “Oracle 8 Architecture”, TM H, 2000References: Date C. J., “An Introduction to Database Systems”, 7th Ed., Narosa Publishing, 2004 Elmsari and Navathe, “Fundamentals of Database Systems”, 4th Ed., A. Wesley, 2004 Ullman J. D., “Principles of Database Systems”, 2nd Ed., Galgotia Publications, 1999
    • MICROPROCESSOR SYSTEMCourse Code: BTM 505 Credit Units: 04Course Objective:This course deals with the systematic study of the Architecture and programming issues of 8085-microprocessorfamily. The aim of this course is to give the students basic knowledge of the above microprocessor needed todevelop the systems using it.Course Contents:Module I: Introduction to Microcomputer S ystemsIntroduction to Microprocessors and microcomputers, Study of 8 bit Microprocessor, 8085 pin configurat ion,Internal Architecture and operations, interrupts, Stacks and subroutines, various data transfer schemes.Module II: ALP and timing diagramsIntroduction to 8085 instruction set, advance 8085 programming, Addressing modes, Counters and time Delays,Instruction cycle, mach ine cycle, T -states, timing diagram for 8085 instruction.Module III: Memory System Design & I/O InterfacingInterfacing with 8085.Interfacing with input/output devices (memo ry mapped, peripheral I/O), Cache memo rysystem. Study of following peripheral devices 8255, 8253, 8257, 8255, 8251.Module IV: Architecture of 16-Bit MicroprocessorDifference between 8085 and 8086, Block diagram and architecture of 8086 family, pin configuration of 8086,Minimu m mode & Maximu m mode Operation. Internal architecture of 8086, Bus Interface Unit, RegisterOrganization, Instruction Pointer, Stack & Stack pointer, mer its of memory segmentation, Execution Unit,Register Organization.Module V: Penti um ProcessorsInternal arch itecture of 8087, Operational overview of 8087, Intro duction to 80186, 80286, 80386 & 80486processors, Pentium processor.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: Ramesh. S. Gaonkar, “M icroprocessor architecture Programming and Application with 8085” Penram International Publishing, 4th Ed ition B.Ram, “Fundamentals of microprocessors and microco mputer” Dhanpat Rai, 5 th Ed ition. Douglas V Hall.References: M. Rafiqu zzaman, “M icroprocessor Theory and Application” PHI – 10th Indian Reprint. Naresh Grover, “M icroprocessor comprehensive studies Architecture, Programming and Interfacing” Dhanpat Rai, 2003. Gosh,” 0000 to 8085” PHI.
    • MACHINE DESIGN LAB - ICourse Code: BTM 520 Credit Units: 01Course Contents:Design of:(i) Cotter Joint(ii) Knuckle Joint(iii) Pipe Jo int(iv) Screw Jack(v) Rigid and Flexible coupling(vi) Spur Gear TrainExamination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.
    • METROLOGY LABCourse Code: BTM 521 Credit Units: 01Course Contents:Name of Experiments:1 Set up a dimension by slip gauges (example 36.936; 14.727…..) Measure this set up by micro meter (least count 0.01) several t imes and read dimensions. Find statistical mean and record the expected variation between the actual dimension and dimension measured by micro meter.2 To check the roundness of a circu lar bar with the help of d ial gauge.3 Mill a component to dimension (23, 57.6,…). Set up a comparator by slip gauge set to this dimension. Check co mponent deviation by the comparator and record the deviation. Measure several times and obtain the mean value.4 Check the bore in a component by a bore-indicator. Set the bore indicator by micro meter and measure the deviation in the bore. Measure several times and obtain the mean value at three positions along the length of the bore.5 Set – up a sine bar for measuring the angle of an inclined surface (of a bracket, mill ing cutter arbor with 7/24 taper, ….). Measure the angle several times and record the mean value. Use height gauge wherever necessary.6 Check angular dimension of a dovetail guide way by measuring across rollers. Check the included angle of a V – block (90º, 60º, …) / or a machined groove by measuring over a roller using height gauge and parallel blocks/slip gauges.7 Measure the straightness of a surface (surface plate; guide way of machine tool) by using straight edge and dial gauge and dial gauge stand. Set up straight edge on jacks such that dial reading at each end coincide. Move the dial stand along the straight edge. Record readings at 50 mm interval and draw a plot. Obtain maximu m deviat ion which is the straightness.8 Measure straightness using a spirit level. Place spirit level at an initial position and note level reading. Move the level on a straight line and take readings at 50 mm intervals. Plot the difference from the original reading and obtain the straightness value.9 Draw a trapezoidal and any other profile in AutoCAD to 1:1 scale. On a steel plate make the profile by fitting and filing. Set up the drawing on profile pro jector. Check the co mponent and note deviations. Correct the profile and recheck. Make the profile as close to the required one.10 To machine a g iven surface and study its roughness characteristics11 To measure the geometry of a screw using profile projector12 To study the cutting tool geometry using tool makers microscopeExamination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.
    • MEASUREMENTS AND CONTROLS LABCourse Code: BTM 522 redit Units: 01Course Contents:List of Experime nts:1. Measurement of resolution and sensitivity of thermocouple (study of various thermocouples J, K, T, etc.) (Calibration)2. Measurement of resolution, sensitivity and non linearity of termistor. (termistor instability)3. Measurement of thickness of LVDT.4. Measurement of resolution of LVDT (and displacement measurement)5. Study of proportional control and offset Problems.6. Study of proportional integral control.7. Study of proportional integral derivative (PID) control.8. Vibrat ion measurement by stroboscope (natural frequency of a cantilever)9. Angular frequency (speed of rotating objects) measurement by stroboscope.10. Pressure transducer study and calibration.11. Proving ring (force measurement)12. Torque cell.13. Closed loop study of an electric circuit.14. Young‟s modulus of a cantilever.15. Young‟s modulus and poison‟s ratio of tensile test piece of M.S.Examination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.
    • MICROPROCESSOR SYSTEM LABCourse Code: BTM 523 redit Units: 01Course Contents:List of Experime nts:1. ALP for 8 b it addition with and without carry2. ALP for 8 b it subtraction with and without borrow3. ALP for 8 b it mu ltiplication and division4. ALP for sorting an array of nu mbers in ascending and descending order5. ALP with additional instructions6. Study of programmab le peripheral interface (8255) board7. Study of programmab le interval t imer (8253) board8. Study of programmab le DMA controller (8257) board9. Study of programmab le interrupt controller (8259) board10. Study of programmab le serial co mmun ication interface (8251) board11. Study of 16 bit M icroprocessor (8086) KitExamination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.
    • PROGRAMMING LAB - II (MAT LAB)Course Code: BTM 524 redit Units: 01Course Objective:It is matrix based simulat ion software wh ich works on algorith ms. It carries vario us tool boxes which is helpfulfor day -to-day accessibility to real world. It helps in designing graphic user interface, provides tools for neuralnetwork. Hard ware which are not economical fo r general purpose, this software tool box helps to minimize thecost ability.Course Contents:Software Require ment: MAT LAB 6.5Name of Experiments:1 To draw the time response for first order transfer function H S   6 S 9second order transfer function H S   45 S  6S  49 2third order transfer function H S   8S S S  2S  32 To realize the time response in simulink by importing the system parameters fro m the wo rk window forgiven transfer function H S   4S S S  9S  53 To draw the bode plot for fo llowing function H S   46S  S  2S  4 S 2  2S  4 and draw the bode plot using input arguments that represents the continuous state space system: x1   0  1   x1  0x        u  2   3  4  x2  1 x  y  10 0 1   0u  x2 4 To draw the Nyquist plot for following functionH S   46S  S  2S  4 S 2  2S  4 and draw the Nyquist plot using input arguments that represents the continuous state space system: x1   0  1   x1  0x        u  2   3  4  x2  1 x  y  10 0 1   0u  x2 5 To draw the root locus plot for following transfer functionH S   45 S S  2S  4 2
    • 6 Write a program to determine the values of the DTFT of a real sequence described as a rational function in  je X e  j   0.008  0.033e  j  0.05e  j 2  0.033e  j 3  0.033e  j 4 1  2.37e  j  2.7e  j 2  1.6e  j3  0.41e  j 4where K= 2567 Write a program to determine the M-point DFT uk  of the fo llo wing N-points sequence un   ,0  n  N  1 1 0, Otherwise here N=8 and M=168 Exp ress the following Z- transform in factored form , p lot its poles and zeros, and then determine its ROCs 2 z 4  16z 3  44z 2  56z  32GZ   3z 4  3z 3  15z 2  18z  129 Write a program to test the stability of the transfer functionH Z   1 4 z  3z  2 z 2  z  1 4 310 Design a DAS o f given four signals with signal conditioning equip ments in SIM ULINKExamination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.
    • RELATIONAL DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM LABCourse Code: BTM 525 Credit Units: 01Software Required: Oracle 9iCourse Contents:Topics covered in Lab will include:1. Database Design2. Data Defin ition (SQL)3. Data Retrieval (SQL)4. Data Modification (SQL)5. Views6. Triggers and ProceduresExamination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.
    • COMMUNICATION SKILLS - IIICourse Code: BTM 541 Credit Units: 01Course Objective:To equip the participant with linguistic skills required in the field of science and technology while guiding themto excel in their academic field.Course Contents:Module IReading Co mprehensionSummarisingParaphrasingModule IIEssay WritingDialogue ReportModule IIIWriting EmailsBrochureLeafletsModule IV: Introduction to PhoneticsVo welsConsonantsAccent and RhythmAccent NeutralizationSpoken English and Listening PracticeExamination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 CAF V GD GP AWeightage (% ) 20 20 25 10 10 10 5CAF – Co mmun ication Assessment FileGD – Group DiscussionGP – Group PresentationText & References: Effective English for Engineering Students, B Cauveri, Macmillan India Creat ive English for Co mmun ication, Krishnaswamy N, Macmillan A Textbook of English Phonetics, Balasubraman ian T, Macmillan
    • BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCE - V (GROUP DYNAMICS AND TEAM BUILDING)Course Code: BTM 543 Credit Units: 01Course Objective:To inculcate in the students an elementary level of understanding of group/team functionsTo develop team spirit and to know the impo rtance of working in teamsCourse Contents:Module I: Group formati onDefinition and CharacteristicsImportance of groupsClassification of groupsStages of group formationBenefits of group formationModule II: Group FunctionsExternal Conditions affecting group functioning: Authority, Structure, Org. Resources, Organizational policiesetc.Internal conditions affecting group functioning: Roles, Norms, Conformity, Status, Cohesiveness, Size, Intergroup conflict.Group Cohesiveness and Group ConflictAdjustment in GroupsModule III: TeamsMeaning and nature of teamsExternal and internal factors effecting teamBuilding Effective TeamsConsensus Build ingCollaborationModule IV: Leadershi pMeaning, Nature and FunctionsSelf leadershipLeadership styles in organizationLeadership in TeamsModule V: Power to empower: Indi vi dual and TeamsMeaning and NatureTypes of powerRelevance in organization and SocietyModule VI: End-of-Semester AppraisalViva based on personal journalAssessment of Behavioural change as a result of train ingExit Level Rating by Self and ObserverExamination Scheme:Components SAP A Mi d Term VIVA Journal for Test (CT) Success (JOS)Weightage (% ) 20 05 20 30 25Text & References: Organizational Behaviour, Dav is, K. Hoover, Judhith D. Effective Small Group and Team Co mmunicat ion, 2002,Harcourt Co lleg e Publishers Dick, Mc Cann & Margerison, Charles: Team Management, 1992 Edit ion, viva books Bates, A. P. and Julian, J.: Sociology - Understanding Social Behaviour Dressers, David and Cans, Donald: The Study of Hu man Interaction Lapiere, Richard. T – Social Change Lindzey, G. and Borgatta, E: Socio metric Measurement in the Handbook of Social Psychology, Addison – Welsley, US. Rose, G.: Oxford Textbook of Public Health, Vo l.4, 1985.
    •  LaFasto and Larson: When Teams Work Best, 2001, Response Books (Sage), New Delhi J William Pfeiffer (ed.) Theories and Models in Applied Behavioural Science, Vo l 2, Group (1996); Pfeiffer & Co mpany Smither Robert D.; The Psychology of Work and Hu man Performance, 1994, Harper Collins College Publishers
    • FRENCH - VCourse Code: BTM 544 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:To furnish some basic knowledge of French culture and civilization for understanding an authentic document andinformat ion relat ing to political and ad min istrative life .Course Contents:Module D: pp. 131 – 156 Uni tés 10, 11Contenu lexical: Unité 10: Prendre des décisions 1. Faire des comparaisons 2. décrire un lieu, le temps, les gens, lamb iance 3. rédiger une carte postale Unité 11: faire face aux problèmes 1. Exposer un problème. 2. parler de la santé, de la malad ie 3. interdire/demander/donner une autorisation 4. connaître la vie polit ique françaiseContenu grammatical: 1. comparatif - co mparer des qualités/ quantités/actions 2. supposition : Si + présent, futur 3. adverbe - caractériser une action 4. pronom " Y"Examination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: le livre à suivre : Campus: To me 1
    • GERMAN - VCourse Code: BTM 545 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:To enable the students to converse, read and write in the language with the help of the basic rules of grammar,which will later help them to strengthen their language.To give the students an insight into the culture, geography, political situation and economic opport unitiesavailable in GermanyIntroduction to Advanced Grammar and Business Language and Professional JargonCourse Contents:Module I: Geniti ve caseGenitive case – Exp lain the concept of possession in genitiveMentioning the structure of weak nounsModule II: Geniti ve prepositionsDiscuss the genitive propositions and their usage: (während, wegen, statt, trotz)Module III: Reflexi ve verbsVerbs with accusative caseVerbs with dative caseDifference in usage in the two casesModule IV: Verbs wi th fixed prepositionsVerbs with accusative caseVerbs with dative caseDifference in the usage of the two casesModule V: TextsA poem „Maxi‟A text RockoModule VI: Picture DescriptionFirstly recognize the persons or things in the picture and identify the situation depicted in the picture;Secondly answer questions of general meaning in context to the picture and also talk about the personalexperiences which co me to your mind upon seeing the picture.Examination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: Wolfgang Hieber, Lern ziel Deutsch Hans-Heinrich Wangler, Sprachkurs Deutsch Schulz Griesbach, Deutsche Sprachlehre für Ausländer P.L Aneja, Deutsch Interessant - 1, 2 & 3 Rosa-Maria Dallap iazza et al, Tangram A ktuell A1/1,2 Braun, Nieder, Sch möe, Deutsch als Fremdsprache 1A, Grundkurs
    • SPANISH - VCourse Code: BTM 546 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:To enable students acquire working knowledge of the language; to give them vocabulary, grammar, voicemodulations/intonations to handle everyday Spanish situations with ease.Course Contents:Module IRevision of earlier semester modulesModule IIFuture TenseModule IIIPresentations in English onSpanish speaking countries‟CultureSportsFoodPeoplePoliticsSocietyGeographyModule IVSituations:En el hospitalEn la co misariaEn la estacion de autobus/trenEn el banco/cambioModule VGeneral revision of Spanish language learnt so far.Examination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: Español Sin Fronteras, Greenfield
    • JAPANESE - VCourse Code: BTM 547 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:To enable the students to converse, read and write language comfortably and be able to converse using differentpatterns and forms taught through out. Students are taught and trained enough to get placed themselves inJapanese companies.Note: Teaching is done in ro man as well as Japanese script.Course Contents:Module IDict ionary form of the verbs, Joining of verbsNegative form of verbsPotential formModule IIJoining of many actions togetherUsage of dictionary form of the verbs in sentencesIntroducing colloquial language.Module IIIDirect form of the speech, quotations,Exp ressing thoughtsActions and reasoningModule IVConclusionReceiv ing and giving things, favour etc.Different forms like „tara‟ form.Module VRevision of the who le syllabusLearning Outcome Students can speak and use different patterns, ways to describe a particular situation and can converse comfo rtably in mentioned situations through out. Students can appear in the interviews for p lacements in Japanese companies.Methods of Private study /Self help Teaching will be supported by handouts, audio-aids, and self-do assignments and role plays. Use of library, visiting and watching movies in Japan and culture center every Friday at 6p m.Examination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References:Text: Teach yourself JapaneseReferences: Shin Nihongo no kiso 1
    • CHINESE – VCourse Code: BTM 548 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:What English words come fro m Chinese? Some of the more common English words with Chinese rootsareginseng, silk, dim su m, fengshui, typhoon, yin and yang, T‟al chi, kung-fu. The course aims at familiarizingthe student with the basic aspects of speaking ability of Mandarin, the language of Mainland China. The courseaims at train ing students in practical skills and nurturing them to interact with a Chinese person.Course Contents:Module IDrillsDialogue practiceObserve picture and answer the question.Pronunciation and intonation.Character writing and stroke orderModule IIIntonationChinese foods and tastes – tofu, chowmian, noodle, Beijing duck, rice, sweet, sour….etc. Learn ing to sayphrases like – Chinese food, Western food, delicious, hot and spicy, sour, salty, tasteless, tender, nutritious, godfor health, fish, shrimps, vegetables, cholesterol is not high, pizza, milk, vitamins, to be able to cook, to be usedto, cook well, once a week, once a month, once a year, twice a week……Repetition of the grammar and verbs taught in the previous module and making dialogues usingit.Co mpliment of degree “de”.Module IIIGrammar the co mplex sentence “suiran … danshi….”Co mparison – It is colder today than it was yesterday…..etc.The Expression “chule….y iwai”. (Besides)Names of different animals.Talking about Great Wall of ChinaShort storiesModule IVUse of “huozhe” and “haishi”Is he/she married?Go ing for a film with a friend.Having a meal at the restaurant and ordering a meal.Module VShopping – Talking abut a thing you have bought, how much money you spent on it? How many kinds werethere? What did you think of others?Talking about a day in your life using co mpliment of degree “de”. When you get up? When do you go for class?Do you sleep early or late? Ho w is Chinese? Do you enjoy your life in the hostel?Making up a dialogue by asking question on the year, month, day and the days of the week an d answer them.Examination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: “Elementary Chinese Reader ” Part-II Lesson 39-46
    • PRACTICAL TRAINING - ICourse Code: BTM 550 Credit Units: 03MethodologyPractical training is based on the theoretical subjects studied by students. It can be arranged within the college orin any related industrial unit. The students are to learn various industrial, technical and administrative processesfollowed in the industry. In case of on-campus training the students will be given specific task offabrication/assembly/testing/analysis. On completion of the practical training the students are to present a reportcovering various aspects learnt by them and give a presentation on same.Examination Scheme:Feedback fro m industry/work place 20Train ing Report 40Viva 15Presentation 25Total 100
    • MANAGEMENT OF MANUFACTURING SYSTEMSCourse Code: BTM 601 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:The overall objective of this course is to provide high caliber engineering students with an in -depthunderstanding of strategic, tactical and operational issues relating to manufacturing industries worldwide. Oncomplet ion of the course the students will be equipped with the state -of-the-art concepts, methods, techniquesand tools to allow them to contribute towards the competitiveness of manufacturing organizations.Course Contents:Module I: IntroductionProduction functions, Plant Organization: Principles of organization, Organization structure -line and staffOrganizationPlant Location, Layout: Process layout product layout and combination layout – methods of layout, economicsof layout.Module II: Producti on Pl anning & ControlTypes of products, demand, demand forecasting, marketing strategies, scheduling and control of scheduling,production control.Module III: Work and method studyDefinition and concepts, method study procedures, symbols, advantages, Flow process charts, Motion study,micro mot ion, SIMO charts, system concepts, classification, analysis techniques.Module IV: Industrial maintenanceTypes, organization for maintenance department, Breakdown and preventive maintenance.Module V: Inventory control and repl acement analysisIntroduction replacement policy and method adopted, EOQ.Module VI: Management conceptsDevelop ment of management principles, scientific management, human relat ion aspects. Project Man agement –CPM and PERT.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: S.K. Sharma, “Industrial Engg. & Operation Management”, S.K. Kataria & Sons. Dr. Ravi Shankar, “Industrial Engg. & Management”, Galgotia Pub licat ions M. Mahajan, “Industrial Engg. & Production Management”, Dhanpat Rai & Co. J Moore, Manufacturing Management, Prentice Hall Buffa, Modern production and operations management, E.S. Wiley eastern.References: Joseph S. Martin ich, “Production & Operat ion Management”, John Wiley & Sons.
    • MACHINE DESIGN - IICourse Code: BTM 602 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:The course aims at developing concepts as to how to analyze mechanical systems and select proper machineelements (bearing, gears, belts, chains). It prepares the students how to design machine element by specifyingtheir type, geometry, material and how to integrate these elements to build a mechanical systems.Course Contents:Module I: Mechanical Dri vesSelection of t ransmission, helical, bevel and worm gears, belt and chain drives.Module II: Fricti on Clutches & BrakesCo mmon friction materials, shoe, band, cone and disc brake their characteristics and design, friction clutches.Module III: Bearings and Lubricati onTypes of sliding bearing, materials, type of lubrication, design of sliding bearing, selection and application ofrolling bearing, seals.Module IVDesign of spring, helical spring, Leaf springModule V: Engi ne partsPiston, connecting rod and crankshaft.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: Maleeve Hart man and O.P. Grover, “Machine Design”, CBS Publicat ion & Publishers. V.B Bhandari, “Machine Design”, Tata McGraw Hill. P.C. Sharma and D.K Aggarwal., “Machine Des ign”, S.K. Kataria & Sons.References: Mahadevan, “Design Data Book”, CBS Publication & Publisher
    • FLUID POWER SYSTEMSCourse Code: BTM 603 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:Flu id power systems cover generation, transmission, and control applica t ions of power by using pressurizedflu ids. This course imparts the knowledge of different flu id power systems (pneumatic and hydraulic) wh ich areused in industries and hydropower plants.Course Contents:Module I: IntroductionEu ler‟s equations for turbo mach ines; impulse and reaction forces due to fluid systems on stationery and movingsystem of vanes; jet propulsion.Module II: Water Turbi nesClassification: Pelton, Francis, Propeller and Kaplan turbines; velocity triangles; efficiency; draft tubes,governing.Module III: PumpsCentrifugal pu mps, velocity triangles, efficiency, turbine pu mps, axial and mixed flo w pu mps.Module IV: Performance of Flui d MachinesSimilarity laws applied to rotodynamic mach ines; specific speed, unit quantities; cha racteristic curves; use ofmodels; cavitations and attendant problems in turbo machines; selection of turbines hydroelectric plants.Module V: Hydraulic Power TransmissionTransmission of hydraulic power through pipe lines; water hammer; precautions against water hammer inturbine and pump installations: hydraulic ram.Module VI: Power HydraulicsPositive pumps: gear, vane, screw, pump, variable delivery valves: flow control, pressure control, directioncontrol, solenoid operated valve, hydraulic circuits, fluid coupling and torque converter.Pneumatic Power: Basic principles, co mparison of pneumatic and hydraulic Systems.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: Gupta, S. C., Flu id Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines, Pearson Education, 2007 R.K. Bansal, “Fluid Mechanics & Hydraulic Mach ines”, Laxmi Pub lications (P) Ltd., 2002.References: Dr. D.S. Ku mar, “Fluid Mechanics & Fluid Power Engineering”, S.K. Kataria & Sons,2001 D.R. Malhotra & N.K. Malhotra, “The Flu id Mech. & Hydraulics”, Satya Prakashan, 2001 V.P. Gupta, Alam Singh, Manish Gupta, “Fluid Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics & Hydrau lics”, CBS Publishers; 1999.
    • METAL CUTTING AND TOOL DESIGNCourse Code: BTM 604 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:Metal cutting involves removing metal through machining operations. Machining traditionally takes place onlathes, drill presses, and milling mach ines with the use of various cutting tools. Successful machin ing alsorequires knowledge about the material being cut. This course is designed in such way that it exp lains all aspects(process and tools) of metal cutting. The course also covers the common tooling setups and operations as well asspecialized applicat ions for the more experienced users.Course Contents:Module I: IntroductionBasic shape of cutting tools, Function of different angles of cutting tools, tool geometry and Nomenc latures-ASA, ORS systems, Conversion of angles, Tool Materials.Module II: Mechanism of chi p formationFracture & yield ing mechanis m, Types of chips, Factors involved in chip formation analysis, shear plane in flatchips, chip formation in drilling and milling.Module III: Mechanism of metal cuttingForce system during turning, merchant circle diagram, velocity relat ionship, stress in conventional shear plane,Energy of cutting process, Ernst& merchant angle relationship, Lee-Shafer relationship, measurement of forces,Heat generation and temperature distribution in metal cutting.Module IV: Theory of Tool wearsCriteria of wear, mach inability and tool life, Flank wear, Crater wear, Taylor‟s tool life equation, causes andmechanis m of tool failu re, cutting fluid, Econo mics of metal machining.Module V: Design for sheet metal worksPress working Terminology, press operation, types of dies, clearance, cutting forces, methods of reducingcutting forces, minimu m diameter of p iercing, center of pressure, Drawing d ies-blank diameter, d rawing force.Module VI: Jigs and Fi xture designImportant considerations in jig and fixture design, Locating and clamping, princip les for location purposes,principles for clamp ing purposes, design principles for jigs and fixtures.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: A Bhattacharya , “Metal cutting theory& practice”, C.B. PublicationReferences: Geoffrey Boothroyd, “Fundamentals of Metal Machin ing & Machine Tools”, Tata McGraw Hill Kogakusha Ltd. P.N. Rao, “Manufacturing Technology”, Tata McGraw Hill Publication Ltd. Dr. P.C. Pandey & C.K. Singh, “Production Engg. Sciences”, Standard Publisher. Distributors. Dr. B.J. Ranganath, “Metal Cutting & Tool Design” Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd.
    • IC ENGINE AND GAS TURBINECourse Code: BTM 605 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:This course provides an in-depth knowledge of the functioning of IC Engine & Gas Turb ine, and also deals withthe combustion techniques used for various fuels. This course finds immense application in automobile industryand gas-operated power plants.Course Contents:Module I: FundamentalsDevelop ment of IC engine, Classification, Working Cycles, Indicator diagram, co mparison of SI Engine and CIEngine, t wo stroke and four-stroke engine, Valve t iming diagram of SI and CI engine.Module II: Air Standard CycleAssumptions in air standard cycle & fuel-air cycle, fuel-air cycle calcu lations, factors influencing fuel-air cycle,effects of variable specific heats, dissociation.Module III: Fuel and CombustionCo mbustion of SI engine, ignit ion limits, normal co mbustion, abnormal co mbustion, effect of engine Variab le inignition lag, spark advance and factors affecting ignition timing, pre -ignit ion, theory, and factors affectingdetonation, PN, HUCR. Co mbustion in CI engine, fundamentals of co mbustion process in Diesel engine, delayperiod, diesel knock, and cold starting of CI engine. IC engine Fuel, co mbustion equations, theoretical air andexcess air, stoichio metric air fuel ratio, desirable Properties of good IC engine fuels knock rat ing of SI enginefuel.Module IV: Performance & TestingTesting and performance of IC engine, performance parameters, basic measurement, engine Performance curve,fuel consumption, load outputs, engine power, heat balance.Module V: Gas Turbi neGeneral aspect of gas turbine, Jules cycle, Brayton cycle, classification, merits of gas turbine, open - cycle gasturbine, closed cycle gas turbine, Inter cooling, Reheating, Re-generation in gas turbine.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: Ganesan, V. Internal Co mbustion Engine, Tata McGraw -Hill. Mathur, M.L. and Sharma, R.P. Internal Co mbustion Engine. Dhanpat Rai Publication Vlad imir Leonidas Maleev. Internal-co mbustion Engines, Theory and Design. McGraw-Hill.References: Lester Clyde Lichty, Robert Leroy Streeter. Internal Co mbustion Engines, McGraw-Hill Wallace Ludwig Lind. Internal-co mbustion Engines: Their Principles and Applications to Automobile, Aircraft, Ginn. Edward Frederic Obert, Burgess Hill Jennings, Internal Co mbustion Engines: Analysis and Practice Joseph Albert Polson. Internal Co mbustion Engines , Chap man & Hall, limited Rolla Clinton Carpenter, Herman Diederichs. Internal Co mbustion Engines, Their Theory Construction and Operation. Van Nostrand companies John Benjamin Hey wood. Internal Co mbustion Engine Fundamentals. McGraw-Hill
    • COMPUTER NETWORKSCourse Code: BTM 606 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:The objective of this course is to gain an understanding of the fundamentals of data communications networks.The course provides a unified and fundamental view of the broad field of data communications networks. Themajor areas are covered: 1) Introduction to computer networks 2) Data transmission, 3) Data Co mmun ication, 4)Network layer 5) Application layer and Advanced N/w.Course Contents:Module I: Intr oductionIntroduction to Computer Networks. Co mputer Networks: evolution, uses, hardware and software. OSI &TCP/ IP reference models, with functionality and design issues of all layers presented in the models. Differenttopologies.Module II: Data TransmissionAnalog and Digital transmission, transmission media, line configuration, data commun ications codes, errordetection and correlation methods. Multiplexing techniques (TDM, FDM ). Data encoding methods: analog todigital, dig ital to analog etc.Module III: Data Communicati on MethodsData communicat ion interface, line control unit, UA RT, USRT, Serial interface, terminal types. SDLC, HDLC,Addressing Switched networks, circuit switching, packet switching, broadcast networks. IEEE 802 LANStandards, framing, error control, flow control.Module IV: Network layer and Transport LayerDesign issues of Network Layer and Transport Layer, Routing algorithms, Virtual circuit and datagram. TCP,UDP, Ip 4, ICMP, introduction of Ip6. Subnet, Virtual Private Networks, Repeaters, Hub, Routers, diff. types ofBridges, Switches, Gateways etcModule V: Applicati on Layers and Advanced N/ wApplication layers: DNS, E-Mail, HTTP, WWW.Advanced N/w: ATM, Frame relay, ISDN, Bluetooth .Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: William Stallings, “Data & Co mputer Co mmun ications”, 6th Edit ion, PHI, 2000. Forouzan, “Data Co mmun ication & Netwo rking”, 2nd Edition, McGraw Hill, 2003.References: W. Tomasi, “Advanced Electronic Co mmun ication Systems”, 2000 James Mart in, “Telecommunications & The Co mputer”, 3rd Ed ition, PHI. 2001 P. C. Gupta, “Data Co mmun ications, PHI, 2001.
    • MACHINE DESIGN LAB - IICourse Code: BTM 620 Credit Units: 01Course Contents:Design and drawing based upon the course Machine Design II such as automotive transmission, brakes, clutchesconnecting rod, I.C. engine piston, connecting rod, hydraulic rivet, mechanical hoist etc.Examination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.
    • FLUID POWER SYSTEMS LABCourse Code: BTM 621 Credit Units: 01Course Contents:Name of Experiments:1. To conduct a test on Centrifugal Pu mp and plot its characteristics2. To Plot the characteristics of Pelton turbine.3. To conducts an experiment on Francis turbine.4. To study the effect of a draft tube on reaction turbines.5. To find the frict ion factor for flow through pipes6. To study the hydraulic controls rig.7. To conduct an experiment fo r verifying model laws.8. To study the cavitations phenomenon in turbines.9. Study of hydraulic couplings and torque converters.Examination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.
    • METAL CUTTING AND TOOL DESIGN LABCourse Code: BTM 622 Credit Units: 01Course Contents:Name of Experiments:1. Step and taper turning on lathe machine2. To make a hexagonal headed bolt on a milling machine.3. To make a job on a shaper.4. To study the Kinemat ics design of workshop machines.5. To make a job on drilling machine as per given specifications.6. To measure cutting forces on a single point cutting tool7. To measure cutting parameters for mu ltipoint cutting tool.8. Study of a punch and die set.9. Study of a jig and fixture.10. Fixture fabrication with case study.11. Study of formation of ch ips during turning and shaping operations on samples of C.I., M.S., Brass, Cu & alu minu m.12. Determination of the life of the cutting tool used on lathe for various cutting speeds, feeds and different work piece materials.Examination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.
    • COMPUTER AIDED DRAFTING AND DESIGN LABCourse Code: BTM 623 Credit Units: 01Course Contents:1. Basics of Auto CAD2. Modeling of machine Co mponents such as Connecting Rod, Piston etc.3. 2D modeling for d ifferent Geo metrics such as Hexagon, Pentagon etc.4. 3D modeling for Nuts and Bolts.5. Modeling of Gear.6. Modeling of Co mpound Geo metrics such as Hollow Cylinder containing Sphere, Triangle etc.Examination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.
    • COMMUNICATION SKILLS - IVCourse Code: BTM 641 Credit Units: 01Course Objective:To enhance the skills needed to work in an English-speaking global business environment.Course Contents:Module I: Business/Technical Language Devel opmentAdvanced Grammar: Syntax, Tenses, VoicesAdvanced Vocabulary skills: Jargons, Terminology, Colloquialis mIndividualised pronunciation practiceModule II: Soci al CommunicationBuilding relationships through Commun icationCo mmunicat ion, Culture and ContextEntertain ment and Co mmun icationInformal business/ Technical Co mmun icationModule III: B usiness CommunicationReading Business/ Technical pressListening to Business/ Technical reports (TV, rad io)Researching for Business /TechnologyModule IV: PresentationsPlanning and getting startedDesign and layout of presentationInformation PackagingMaking the PresentationExamination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 CAF V GD GP AWeightage (% ) 20 20 25 10 10 10 5CAF – Co mmun ication Assessment FileGD – Group DiscussionGP – Group PresentationText & References: Business Vocabulary in Use: Advanced Mascull, Cambridge Business Co mmunication, Raman – Prakash, Oxford Business Co mmunications, Rodgers, Cambridge Working in Eng lish, Jones, Cambridge New International Business English, Jones/Alexander, Cambridge
    • BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCE - VI (STRESS AND COPING STRATEGIES)Course Code: BTM 643 Credit Units: 01Course Objective:To develop an understanding the concept of stress its causes, symptoms and consequences.To develop an understanding the consequences of the stress on one‟s wellness, health, and work performance.Course Contents:Module I: StressMeaning & NatureCharacteristicsTypes of stressModule II: Stages and Models of StressStages of stressThe physiology of stressStimu lus-oriented approach.Response-oriented approach.The transactional and interact ional model.Pressure – environment fit model of stress.Module III: Causes and symptoms of stressPersonalOrganizationalEnvironmentalModule IV: Consequences of stressEffect on behaviour and personalityEffect of stress on performanceIndividual and Organizational consequences with special focus on healthModule V: Strategies for stress managementImportance of stress managementHealthy and Unhealthy strategiesPeer group and social supportHappiness and well-beingModule VI: End-of-Semester AppraisalViva based on personal journalAssessment of Behavioural change as a result of train ingExit Level Rating by Self and ObserverExamination Scheme:Components SAP A Mi d Term VIVA Journal for Test (CT) Success (JOS)Weightage (% ) 20 05 20 30 25Text & References: Blonna, Richard; Coping with Stress in a Changing World: Second edition Pestonjee, D.M, Pareek, Udai, Agarwal Rita; Studies in Stres s and its Management Pestonjee, D.M.; St ress and Coping: The Indian Experience Clegg, Brian; Instant Stress Management – Bring calm to your life now
    • FRENCH - VICourse Code: BTM 644 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:To strengthen the language of the students both in oral and written so that they can:i) exp ress their sentiments, emotions and opinions, reacting to information, situations;ii) narrate incidents, events;iii) perform certain simp le co mmunicat ive tasks.Course Contents:Module D: pp. 157 – 168 – Uni té 12 Unité 12: sévader 1. présenter, caractériser, défin ir 2. parler de livres, de lectures 3. préparer et organiser un voyage 4. exprimer des sentiments et des opinions 5. téléphoner 6. faire une réservationContenu grammatical: 1. proposition relat ive avec pronom relatif "qui", "que", "où" - pour caractériser 2. faire + verbeExamination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: le livre à suivre: Campus: To me 1
    • GERMAN - VICourse Code: BTM 645 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:To enable the students to converse, read and write in the language with the help of the basic rules of grammar,which will later help them to strengthen their language.To give the students an insight into the culture, geography, political situation and economic opportunitiesavailable in GermanyIntroduction to Advanced Grammar and Business Language and Professional JargonCourse Contents:Module I: Adjecti ve endingsAdjective endings in all the four cases discussed so farDefinite and indefinite art iclesCases without articleModule II: Comparati ve adverbsCo mparative adverbs as and likeModule III: Compound wordsTo learn the structure of compound words and the correct article which they takeExp loring the possibility of co mpound words in GermanModule IV: Infiniti ve sentenceSpecial usage of „to‟ sentences called zu+ infinit ive sentencesModule V: TextsA Dialogue: „Ein schwieriger Gast‟A text : „Abgeschlossene Vergangenheit‟Module VI: Comprehension textsReading and comprehending various texts to consolidate the usage of the constructions learnt so far in thissemester.Module VII: Picture DescriptionFirstly recognize the persons or things in the picture and identify the situation depicted in the picture;Secondly answer questions of general meaning in context to the picture and also talk about the personalexperiences which co me to your mind upon seeing the picture.Examination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: Wolfgang Hieber, Lern ziel Deutsch Hans-Heinrich Wangler, Sprachkurs Deutsch Schulz Griesbach, Deutsche Sprachlehre für Ausländer P.L Aneja, Deutsch Interessant- 1, 2 & 3 Rosa-Maria Dallap iazza et al, Tangram A ktuell A1/1,2 Braun, Nieder, Sch möe, Deutsch als Fremdsprache 1A, Grundkurs
    • SPANISH – VICourse Code: BTM 646 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:To enable students acquire working knowledge of the language; to give them vocabulary, grammar, voicemodulations/intonations to handle everyday Spanish situations in Present as well as in Present Perfect Tensewith ease.Course Contents:Module IRevision of the earlier modulesModule IIPresent Perfect TenseModule IIICo mmands of irregular verbsModule IVExp ressions with Tener que and Hay queModule VEn la embajadaEmergency situations like fire, illness, accident, theftExamination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: Español, En Directo I A Español Sin Fronteras
    • JAPANESE - VICourse Code: BTM 647 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:To enable the students to converse in the language with the help of verbs and the usage of different sentencepatterns, which help them to strengthen the language.Students are taught and trained enough to get placed in Japanese companies.Note: The teaching is done in ro man as well as Japanese script. 10 more kanjis are introduced in this semester.Course Contents:Module I: Polite form of verbsExp ressing feelings with the polite forms of verb.Module II: Potenti al formAbility of doing or not doing somethingModule III: ConjunctionsJoining two sentences with the help of shi and moModule IV: Intransitive VerbsSentence patterns of indirect speechModule V: Feelings and expressionsRegret, existence etc.Learning Outcome Students can speak the language with the use of different forms of verb.Methods of Private study/ Self help Hand-outs, audio -aids, assignments and role-plays will support classroom teaching. Students are encouraged to watch Japanese movies at Japan Cultural and information center.Examination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: Shin Nihon-go no Kiso Lesson No. 26 to 30. All vocabulary and topics taught are fro m the above-mentioned book.
    • CHINESE – VICourse Code: BTM 648 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:Chinese emperor Qin Sh i Huang – Ti who built the great wall of China also built a network of 270 palaces,lin ked by tunnels, and was so afraid of assassination that he slept in a different palace each night. The courseaims at familiarizing the student with the basic aspects of speaking ability of Mandarin, the language ofMainland China. The course aims at training students in practical skills and nurturing them to interact with aChinese person.Course Contents:Module IDrillsDialogue practiceObserve picture and answer the question.Pronunciation and intonation.Character writing and stroke order.Module IIGo ing out to see a science exhibit ionGo ing to the theatre.Train or Plane is behind schedule.Indian Economy-Chinese Econo myTalking about different Seasons of the Year and Weather conditions. Learning to say phrases like -spring,summer, fall, winter, fairly hot, very co ld, very hu mid, very stuffy, neither hot nor cold, most comfortable,pleasant …. etc.Module IIITemperature – how to say – What is the temperature in May here? How is the weather in su mmer in your area? Around 30 degrees Heating, air-condition ing Is winter is Shanghai very cold?Talking about birthdays and where you were born?The verb “shuo” (speak) saying useful phrases like speak very well, do not speak very well, if speak slowly thenunderstand if speak fast then don‟t understand, difficult to speak, difficult to write, speak too fast, speak tooslow, listen and can understand, listen and cannot understand … etc.Tell the fo llo wing in Chinese – My name is …. I was born in … (year). My b irthday is ……… Today is …(date and day of the week). I go to work (school) everyday. I usually leave home at . (O‟clock). In the evening,I usually ………. (do what)? At week end, I ………. On Sundays I usually …………… It is today….. It willsoon be my younger sisters birthday. She was born in ….. (year). She lives in ………. (where). She is working(or studying)…… where… She lives in …….. (where.)Examination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: Elementary Chinese Reader Part-2, 3; Lesson 47-54
    • OPERATIONS RESEARCHCourse Code: BTM 701 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:In a rap idly changing environ ment an understanding is sought which will facilitate the choice and theimplementation of mo re effect ive solutions, which, typically, may involve comp lex interactions among people,materials and money. Organizations may seek a very wide range of operational improvements - for examp le,greater efficiency, better customer service, higher quality or lo wer cost. Whatever the business, engineering aim,Operation Research can offer the flexib ility and adaptability to provide objective help. This course introdu cesstudents to the principles of operational research.Course Contents:Module I: Linear ProgrammingFormulat ion of problem. Graphical and simp lex method for maximizat ion and minimization. Duality theory andsensitivity analysisModule II: Trans portation ModelsStepping stone algorithm, MODI method and Vogel‟s Approximation Method (VAM) for selfing balanced,unbalanced transportation problems and problems of degeneracy and maximization.Module III: Assignment ModelsAssignment model for maximizat ion and traveling salesman problems, Industrial ProblemsModule IV: Queuing TheoryBasic structured, Terminology, classification. Birth and death process. Sequencing: Processing in jobs throughmach ines with the same processing order. Processing of 2 jobs through machines with each having differentprocessing order.Module V: Network ModelsIntroduction to PERT and CPM. Fundamental concept of Network models and construction of networkdiagrams. PERT activity, time estimate. Critical path and project time duration. Probability of complet ing theproject on or before specified t ime. Float of a activity.Module VI: Games TheoryZero Sum t wo person competitive games, Minimax and maximini princip le Arith metic, algebraic, matrixalgebra method,. Solution by do minance, sub game, Graphical and linear programming method.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References: HM Wagner, Principles of Operations Research, Prentice Hall Heizer, J. & Render B., Operat ions Management, Pearson Education (8/e), 2006 PK Gupta and DS Hira, Operat ions Research, S. Chand & Co. Taha, Introduction to Operation Research F.S. Hiller and G.I. Libermann, Introduction to Operation Research, Holden Ray.
    • COMPUTER AIDED MANUFACTURINGCourse Code: BTM 702 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:The aim of the course is to impart the students the basic and essential concepts in using Co mputer AssistedManufacturing (CAM) and Co mputer Nu merical Control (CNC) machines. Students will learn the basicconcepts of manufacturing planning and control. They will be offered hands on experience in using CAMsoftware to design, simulate and write CNC programs.Course Contents:Module IIntroduction to Numerical control. Programmed automation. No menclature, type and features of NC machinestools. Axes designation. Point to point, straight and continuous control systems.Module IIMachining centre and Turning centre, Automatic tool changer, Machine Tool beds and automated palletchangers.Module IIIMachine Control Unit, Actuation Systems, open and close loop systems, transducers for NC Systems, revolves,encoders and inductosyn.Module IVManual Part Programming: Processes planning, G&M codes. Interpolation Cycles. Tool co mpensation,Subroutines, Introduction to Computer Aided Part Programming.Module VTooling and tool presetting. Co mputer Aided inspection - Contact Inspection (Coordinate Measuring Machine)& Non Contact Inspection.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: Mikell P. Groover, “Automation, Production Systems and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing”, 2nd Edit ion, Pentice Hall, 2001. Rao, Kundra & Tiwari, “Co mputer aided Manufacturing” Tata McGraw Hill, 2007. Nu merical Control: by Koren, Khanna Publisher.References: Mikell P. Groover, Emo ry W. Zimmers, “CAD/ CAM”, Pearson Education, 2006. P.N. Rao, “CAD/ CAM Principles and Applications”, Tata McGraw Hill, 2006.
    • MECHATRONICSCourse Code: BTM 703 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:Mechatronics is basically comb ination of mechanical and electronics engineering. With growing demands ofautomation of different mechanical operation this subject fulfills the needs. Main objective of this course is toprovide knowledge of different co mb inations of mechanical and electronics processes and various software usedin it.Course Contents:Module I: IntroductionMeasurement systems, control systems, Microprocessor-based controllers, Sensors and tranducers, Signalconditioning processes.Module II: Actuation SystemsPneumatic and hydraulic actuation systems, Directional control valves, pressure control valves, process controlvalves.Module III: S ystem ModelsMathematical models, Mechanical system building blocks, modeling dynamic systems, First ord er systems,Second order systems.Module IV: Princi ples of Feedback & Intelligent ControlControl Systems, Open & Closed loop control Systems, Controllers, Artificial Neural Network.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: W. Bo lton, “Mechatronics”, Pearson Education Ltd., 2003.References: Mohammad Ali Mazidi Janice Gillispier Mazidi, “The 8051 M icrocontroller”, Pearson Education Inc., 2004. Gary Dunning, “Introduction to Programmable Logic Controllers”, Tho mson Asia P. Ltd., Singapore, 1998. Gopal K. Dubey, “Fundamentals of Electrical Drives”, Narosa Publishing House, 2001. Charles H. Roth, “Jr. Fundamentals of Logic Design”, Jaico Publishing House, 2001. "HMT Mechatronics”, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Co. Ltd., 2001. Devdas Shetty, Richard A. Kolk “Mechatronics System Design”, Tho mson Asia Pvt. Ltd., Singapore, 2001. A.K. Tayal, “Instrumentation & Mechanical Measurements”, Galgotia Publication Pvt. Ltd., 2003. D. Rana Durgaiah, “Flu id Mechanics & Machinery”, New Age Int. Publishers, 2004. Nitaigour Premchand Mahalik, “Mechatronics Princip les, Concepts & Application”, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Co.Ltd, 2003. Mikell P. Groover, “Automation, Production Systems and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing”, 2nd Ed ition, Prentice Hall, 2001.
    • OPERATIONS RESEARCH (PROGRAMMING) LABCourse Code: BTM 720 Credit Units: 01Course Contents:1. Program on C or C++ for Linear Programming.2. Program on C or C++ for Simp lex Prob lem.3. Program on C or C++ for Assignment Problem.4. Program on C or C++ for Transportation Problem.5. Program on C or C++ for PA RT, CPM Problem.6. Program on C or C++ for Sequencing Problem.Examination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.
    • COMPUTER AIDED MANUFACTURING LABCourse Code: BTM 721 Credit Units: 01Course Contents:Name of Experiments:1. Make a sketch of CNC lathe showing major assemblies and ind icate the CNC axes with designations. Make a sketch of the conventional lathe and, if it is considered as a CNC lathe, show the axes with designations.2. Make a Kinematics diagram of CNC Lathe showing all machine sub -assemblies. Indicate bearing arrangements, ball screw arrangements with sizes, wherever available.3. Repeat (1) on CNC machin ing centre and conventional milling mach ine.4. Repeat (2) for CNC mach ining centre.5. Study the CNC lathe. Prepare a block diagram of controls. Identify location and type of transducers and indicate on an outline of the machine. Describe how they function.6. Repeat (5) on mach ining centre.7. Study the work holding and tool holding devices in the CNC lathe and machining centre and draw up their specifications and capacities.8. Prepare part programs for 2 specified components for CNC lathe by manual part programming. First write the machin ing technology in full; then prepare part program and then enter in the machine. Test the program in dry run and by tool path graphic simulat ion. Machine the co mponent.9. Do the above work for mach ining centre.Examination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.
    • MECHATRONICS LABCourse Code: BTM 722 Credit Units: 01Course Contents:Name of Experiments:1. To make the sequential operation A + B+ A - B- ; A +, B+, B- A - using Pneumatic trainer2. For the above write a ladder logic g iving time delays3. Design a Pneumat ic Circuit for clamp ing type & operated by PLC4. To make the sequential operation A +, B+, A -, B- ; A +, B+ , B- A - using Hydraulic trainer kit.5. For the above write a ladder logic g iving time delays6. Design a Hydraulic Circuit for clamp ing type & operated by PLC7. To make the ladder logic for water level control & reaction vessel to detect different levels of water and switch off the water supply.8. Starter Control & Star Delta Starter for ¼ HP A C. Motor to demonstrate the use of PLC Motor Starting9. Design Fan operation using PLC10. Design n a Lift Control11. Design a pick & Place12 Design Sequential Switching MotorsExamination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.
    • COMMUNICATION SKILLS - VCourse Code: BTM 741 Credit Units: 01Course Objective:To facilitate the learner with Academic Language Proficiency and make them effect ive users of functionallanguage to excel in their profession.Course Contents:Module IIntroduction to Public SpeakingBusiness ConversationEffective Public SpeakingArt of PersuasionModule II: S peaking for EmploymentTypes of InterviewStyles of InterviewFacing Interviews-Fundamentals and Practice SessionConducting Interviews- Fundamentals and Pract ice SessionQuestion Answer on Various DimensionsModule IIIResume WritingCovering LettersInterview Follow Up LettersModule IV: Basic Telephony SkillsGu idelines for Making a CallGu idelines for Answering a CallModule V: Work Pl ace S peakingNegotiationsParticipation in MeetingsKeynote SpeechesExamination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 CAF V GD GP AWeightage (% ) 20 20 25 10 10 10 5CAF – Co mmun ication Assessment FileGD – Group DiscussionGP – Group PresentationText & References: Jermy Co mfort, Speaking Effectively, et.al, Cambridge Krishnaswamy, N, Creat ive English for Co mmun ication, Macmillan Raman Prakash, Business Co mmunication, Oxford. Taylor, Conversation in Pract ice,
    • BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCE - VII (INDIVIDUAL, SOCIETY AND NATION)Course Code: BTM 743 Credit Units: 01Course Objective:This course aims at enabling students towards: Understand the importance of individual differences Better understanding of self in relation to society and nation Facilitation for a meaningful existence and adjustment in society Inculcating patriotism and national prideCourse Contents:Module I: Indi vi dual differences & PersonalityPersonality: Definit ion& RelevanceImportance of nature & nurture in Personality DevelopmentImportance and Recognition of Indiv idual differences in PersonalityAccepting and Managing Individual differences (adjustment mechanisms)Intuition, Judgment, Perception & Sensation (MBTI)BIG5 FactorsModule II: Managing Di versityDefining DiversityAffirmation Action and Managing DiversityIncreasing Diversity in Work ForceBarriers and Challenges in Managing DiversityModule III: Soci alizati onNature of SocializationSocial InteractionInteraction of Socialization ProcessContributions to Society and NationModule IV: Patriotism and National Pri deSense of pride and patriotismImportance of discipline and hard workIntegrity and accountabilityModule V: Human Rights, Values and EthicsMeaning and Importance of hu man rightsHu man rights awarenessValues and Ethics- Learning based on project work on Scriptures like - Ramayana, Mahabharata, Gita etc.Module VI: End-of-Semester AppraisalViva based on personal journalAssessment of Behavioural change as a result of train ingExit Level Rating by Self and ObserverExamination Scheme:Components SAP A Mi d Term VIVA Journal for Test (CT) Success (JOS)Weightage (% ) 20 05 20 30 25Text & References: Davis, K. Organizational Behaviour, Bates, A. P. and Julian, J.: Sociology - Understanding Social Behaviour Dressler, David and Cans, Donald: The Study of Hu man Interaction Lapiere, Richard. T – Social Change Lindzey, G. and Borgatta, E: Socio metric Measurement in the Handbook of Social Psychology, Addison – Welsley, US. Rose, G.: Oxford Textbook of Public Health, Vo l.4, 1985. Robbins O.B.Stephen;. Organizat ional Behaviour
    • FRENCH - VIICourse Code: BTM 744 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:Revise the portion covered in the first volume, give proper orientation in co mmunication and culture.Course Contents:Module A: Uni tés 1 – 3: pp. 06 - 46Contenu lexical: Uni té 1: Rédiger et présenter son curriculu m vitae Exprimer une opinion Caractériser, mettre en valeur Parler des rencontres, des lieu x, des gens Unité 2: Imag iner - Faire des projets Proposer - conseiller Parler des qualités et des défauts Faire une demande écrite Raconter une anecdote Améliorer son image Unité 3: Exp rimer la volonté et l‟obligation Fo rmuler des souhaits Exprimer un manque/un besoin Parler de l‟environnement, des animau x, des catastrophes naturellesContenu grammatical: 1. Le passé : passé composé/imparfait 2. Pronoms co mpléments directs/indirects, y/en (idées/choses) 3. Propositons relatives introduites par qui, que, où 4. Co mparatif et superlatif 5. Le conditionnel p résent 6. Situer dans le temps 7. Fémin in des adjectifs 8. La p rise de paroles : exp ressions 9. Le subjonctif : volonté, obligationExamination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: le livre à suivre : Campus: To me 2
    • GERMAN - VIICourse Code: BTM 745 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:To enable the students to converse, read and write in the language with the help of the basic rules of grammar,which will later help them to strengthen their language.To give the students an insight into the culture, geography, political situation and economic opportunitiesavailable in GermanyIntroduction to Advanced Grammar and Business Language and Professional JargonCourse Contents:Module I: Dass- SätzeExp lain the use of the conjunction “-that”, where verb co mes at the end of the sentenceModule II: Indirekte FragesätzeTo explain the usage of the “Question Pronoun” as the Relative Pronoun in a Relat ive Sentence, where again theverb falls in the last place in that sentence.Module III: Wenn- SätzeEquivalent to the conditional “If-” sentence in English. Explain that the verb comes at the end of the sentence.Module IV: Weil- SätzeExp lain the use of the conjunction “because-” and also tell that the verb falls in the last place in the sentence.Module V: Comprehension textsReading and comprehending various texts to consolidate the usage of the constructions learnt so far in thissemester.Module VI: Picture DescriptionFirstly recognize the persons or things in the picture and identify the situation depicted in the picture;Secondly answer questions of general meaning in context to the picture and also talk about the personalexperiences which co me to your mind upon seeing the picture.Examination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: Wolfgang Hieber, Lern ziel Deutsch Hans-Heinrich Wangler, Sprachkurs Deutsch Schulz Griesbach, Deutsche Sprachlehre für Ausländer P.L Aneja, Deutsch Interessant- 1, 2 & 3 Rosa-Maria Dallap iazza et al, Tangram A ktuell A1/1,2 Braun, Nieder, Sch möe, Deutsch als Fremdsprache 1A, Grundkurs
    • SPANISH - VIICourse Code: BTM 746 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:To enable students acquire working knowledge of the languag e; to give them vocabulary, grammar, exp ressionsused on telephonic conversation and other situations to handle everyday Spanish situations with ease.Course Contents:Module IRevision of earlier semester modulesModule IIZodiac signs. More adjectives…to describe situations, state of minds, surroundings, people and places.Module IIIVarious expressions used on telephonic conversation (formal and informal)Module IVBeing able to read newspaper headlines and extracts (Material to be provided by teac her)Module VNegative commands (AR ending verbs)Module VIRevision of earlier sessions and introduction to negative ER ending commands, introduction to negative IRending verbsExamination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: Español En Directo I A, 1B Español Sin Fronteras Material provided by the teacher from various sources
    • JAPANESE - VIICourse Code: BTM 747 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:To enable the students to converse in the language with the help of different speech, possibilit ies, probabilit iesetc.Note: The teaching is done in ro man as well as Japanese script. 10 more kanjis (Japanese characters) are taughtin this semester.Course Contents:Module I: Thoug htExp ressing one‟s thought and intentions on different situations.Module II: AdviceGiv ing advice, probability, possibility and suggestions.Module III: Informal S peechAddressing friends and close people using informal ways.Module IV: Simultaneous VerbsDescribing two situations simultaneously.Module V: PossibilityExp laining the probability and possibility of any situation.Learning Outcome Students can interact in a formal as well as informal way on above-mentioned topics.Methods of Private study/ Self help Hand-outs, audio-aids, assignments and role-plays will support classroom teaching.Examination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: Shin Nihon-go no Kiso Lesson No.-31 to 35. All vocabulary and topics taught to the students are from the above mentioned book.
    • CHINESE – VIICourse Code: BTM 748 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:The story of Cinderella first appears in a Chinese book written between 850 and 860 A.D. The course aims atfamiliarizing the student with the basic aspects of speaking ability of Mandarin, the language of MainlandChina. The course aims at train ing students in practical skills and nurturing them to interact with a Ch ineseperson.Course Contents:Module IDrillsDialogue practiceObserve picture and answer the question.About china part –I Lesson 1,2.Module IIPronunciation and intonationCharacter Writing and stroke order.Module IIIAsk someone what he/she usually does on weekends?Visit ing people, Party, Meeting, After work….etc.Module IVConversation practiceTranslation fro m Eng lish to Chinese and vise-versa.Short fables.Module VA brief su mmary o f grammar.The optative verb “yuanyi”.The pronoun “ziji”.Examination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: “Kan tu shuo hua” Part-I Lesson 1-7
    • INDUSTRIAL TRAININGCourse Code: BTM 750 Credit Units: 04Methodology:Practical training is based on the theoretical subjects studied by students. It can be arranged within the college orin any related industrial unit. The students are to learn various industrial, technical and administrative processesfollowed in the industry. In case of on-campus training the students will be given specific task offabrication/assembly/testing/analysis. On completion of the practical training the students are to present a reportcovering various aspects learnt by them and give a presentation on same.Examination Scheme:Feedback fro m industry/work place 20Train ing Report 40Viva 15Presentation 25Total 100
    • AUTOMOTIVE ENGINEERINGCourse Code: BTM 704 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:This course emphasizes on constructional details of automotive vehicles which includes – Basic structure,engine, transmission systems, suspension systems, steering system, braking systems and wheels & tyres..Course Contents:Module IIntroduction, Components of an automobile, basic engine terminology, engine cycles, working of an IC engine.Basic engine design considerations, constructional details of C.I. and S.I. engines. crank shafts, connecting rod,piston, values, cams, man ifo lds, air cleaners, mufflers, rad iators, and oil filters.Module II: Transmission SystemDescription and working of manually operated gearboxes like sliding mesh, constant mesh, synchromesh andepicycle; hydraulic torque convertor and its construction working and performance, sem-automatic and fu llyautomatic transmission, Hydramatic transmission, analysis of differentials, live axles, construction working andrequirements of overdrive.Module III: Steering SystemIntroduction, Front axle, wheel align ment, Steering geometry, steering mechanisms, Ackerman steering, centerpoint steering, power steering.Module IV: SuspensionObjective, requirement, function, types Shock absorbers, Independent suspension, Stabilizer, air suspension,Hydroelastic suspension, Hydragas interconnected suspension.Module VPrinciple, braking requirements, brake efficiency, fading of brakes, types of brakes, bleeding of brakes, brakeflu id.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: Kirpal Singh, “Automobile Engg.”, Vol. I & II, Standard Publishers, 2004 N.K. Giri, “Automotive Mechanics”, Khanna Publishers Narang G.B.S., “Automobile Engg.”, Khanna Publishers Srinivasan, “Automotive Engines”, Tata McGraw Hill K.K. Jain & R.B. Asthana, “Automobile Engineering”, Tata McGraw HillReferences: James D. Halderman and Chase D. M itchell Jr., Automotive Engines - Theory and Servicing, Pearson Education, 2007 Joseph Haitner, “Automotive Mechanics”, C.B.S. Publicat ions
    • COMPUTER AIDED DESIGNINGCourse Code: BTM 705 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:The objective of this course is to impart students an in-depth exposure to methods in geometric modeling and itsapplications in CAD/CAM. This course introduces integrated approach to CAD including: Overview of CAD,numerical techniques for CAD, Co mputer graphics and design, Princip le and management of design data basesystem, finite element analysis and CAD, Design optimization. A long with the theoretical presentations,commercial CAD software are also introduced and applied to create Engin eering components and assemblies.Course Contents:Module IIntroduction to CAD. Design process, Introduction to solid modeling and aided design of some elements/components, hardware requirements, concurrent engineering.Module IIElementary Co mputer Graphics. Transformations, Mappings, Projections – orthographic, isometric, perspective.Module IIIRepresentation of surfaces. Plane surfaces, Ru led surfaces, Surfaces of revolution, Sweep surfaces, Beziersurface, Bicubic surface patch, Approximat ion B – spline surface, co mposite surfaces.Module IV: Soli d ModelingSet theory, Graph theory, Regularized Boolean operations, B-rep modeling, Sweep representations, Spatialoccupancy enumeration.Module V: Advanced CADMechanical assembly, Geo metric property formulation- curve length, surface are calculations, volumecalculation, centriod calculation, Tolerances representations, Animation, Simulat ion, Strategic factors in productdesign, Robust design for product, Introduction to Finite element modeling and an alysis .Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: Ibrahim Zeid, “CAD/ CAM Theory and Practice”, Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company Limited, 6th Ed ition 1998. David F. Rogers and J. Alan Adams, “Mathematical Elements for Co mputer GraPrentice Hall Indiacs”, Tata McGraw-Hill, 2nd Ed ition 2002.References: Ibrahim Zeid, “Mastering CAD/ CAM”, Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Co mpany Limited,
    • AUTOMOTIVE ENGINEERING LABCourse Code: BTM 723 Credit Units: 01Course Contents:List of Experime nts:1. Drawing Valve Timing Diagram2. Determination of Firing Order of engine3. Specification of engine4. Study of different parts of engine5. Study of Clutch6. Study of Hydraulic Brake System7. Study of Carburetor8. Study of various parts of Auxiliary systems9. Study of Wheel10. Study of emission system11. Study of steering systemExamination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35 Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva
    • COMPUTER AIDED DESIGNING LABCourse Code: BTM 724 Credit Units: 01Course Contents:List of Experime nts:1. Analysis and design using ANSYS/Pro-E software for:2. Flange Coupling.3. Design Shaft.4. Design for Key.5. Design for Spur Gear.6. Design for Helical Gear.7. Parts of Thin Cylinder Pressure Vessels.Examination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva
    • MARKETING MANAGEMENTCourse Code: BTM 706 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:The course aims at making students understand concepts, philosophies, process and techniques of managingmarket ing operations of a firm.Course Contents:Module I: Introduction to MarketingMeaning, nature and scope of marketing; Market ing philosophies; Marketing management process; Concept ofmarket ing mix.Module II: Market Anal ysisUnderstanding market ing environ ment; Consumer and industrial buyer behavio ur; Market measurement; Marketsegmentation, selection and positioning.Module III: Product Planning and PricingProduct concept; Types of products; Major product decisions; Brand management; Product life cycle, Newproduct development process; Pricing decisions; Determinants of price; Pricing process, policies and strategies.Module IV: Promotion and Distri buti on decisionsCo mmunicat ion process; Promotion tools – advertising, personal selling, publicity and sales promotion;Distribution channel decisions – types and functions of intermed iaries, Selection and management ofintermediaries; Log istics decisions – inventory management, warehousing, transportation and insurance.Module V: Marketing Organizati on and ControlEmerging trends and issues in marketing – Consumeris m, rural marketing, social market ing; direct and onlinemarket ing; green market ing.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References: Baker, Michael J., Marketing: An Introductory Text, McMillan Press Ltd. Czinkota, Michael R., Massaki, Kotabe and David Mercer B., Marketing Management: Text and Cases, Blackwell Publishers, Massachusetts. Kotler, Ph ilip, Market ing Management: Analysis Planning, Imp lementation and Control, 9th Ed., Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd. , New Delhi. Kotler, Philip and Armstrong, Gary, Principles of Marketing, 6th ed., Prentice Hall of Indi, Pvt. Ltd., New Delh i. Mc Carthy, E.Jero me and Pessault, William D. Jr., Basic Marketing, Richard D. Irwin Inc., Ho mewood, Illinois. Saxena, Rajan, Marketing Management, Tata McGraw Hill Pub lishing Co mpany, New Delhi. Stanton, William J., Eizel, Michael J. and Walker Bruce J., Fundamentals of Marketing, 10th ed., McGraw Hill.
    • SOLAR ENERGYCourse Code: BTM 707 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:The objective of this course is to introduce materials relevant to the engineering of solar electric and thermalsystems. Students will develop the skills to calculate the amount of incident solar flu x, the amount of usefulenergy collected, the amount stored and the amount ultimately used. Man y of these calculations will be based onsolar applications in different area. Finally the concepts of engineering economics applied to solar energy willalso be introduced.Course Contents:Module I: Selected topics in Heat TransferHeat transfer modes, properties and radiation characteristics of opaque and partially t ransparent media.Module II: Model Solar Radi ati onOrigin, nature and availability of solar radiation, measurements of solar radiation data and its estimation, effectsof receiv ing surface orientation and motion.Module III: Components, process and system modesDesign consideration and performance of flat plate and focussing collectors; energy storage components, waterstorage, packed bed and phase-change energy storage; mathematical models of various solar systems andcomponents.Module IV: ApplicationSolar water heating, solar air heaters, solar space heating and cooling, solar pumps, solar thermal power, solarfurnaces and solar distillation.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References: H.P. Garg and J. Prakash, “Solar Energy fundamental and Applications”, Tata McGraw Hil l Pu lishing Co. Ltd. Magal, “Solar Power Engineering”, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Co. Ltd
    • POWER PLANT PRACTICESCourse Code: BTM 708 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:The objective of this course is that the students come to kno w different ways of producing energy such asthermal energy fro m gas and steam, hydraulic energy nuclear energy, non conventional source of energy fromwind, solar and tidal. And their different uses in productive works.Course Contents:Module I: Steam Generator PlantFuel handling systems, Indian coals, co mbustion of coal in furnaces; fluidized bed co mbustion; High pressureheavy duty boilers, Super critical and once through boilers influence of operating conditions on layout ofevaporator, superheated, reheated and economizer; dust collectors; ash disposal, fans and draft systems.Module II: Turbine Pl aneLayout of turbine plant room, corrosion in condensers and boilers, feed water treat ment; feed heating and deaeration system; cooling water systems and cooling towers.Module III: ControlImportant instruments on steam generator and turbine; drum water level control, co mbustion control and superheat temperature control; testing of power plants and heat balance.Module IV: Other Power PlantGeneral layout of I.C. Engines and turbine power plants, types, gas turbine plants, fields of application, Nuclearpower plants, power reactors and nuclear steam turbines; handling of nuclear waste and safety measures, peakload power generation methods.Module V: EconomicsPlanning for power generation in India, super thermal power p lants, estimation of cost of power generation;choice of plant site.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: Arora & Do mkundwar, “A course in Po wer Plant Engineering”, Dhanpat Rai & SonsReferences: Black Veatch, “Po wer Plant Engineering”, CBS Publisher
    • COMBUSTION ENGINE EMISSIONSCourse Code: BTM 709 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:The main objective of this course is to introduce students the fundamentals, Operations and performance ofinternal co mbustion engines and their different types ; to provide them with the theoretical and experimentalability to operate, analyze and design internal combustion engines; to assess the relation between engine poweroutput to the required power for vehicle propulsion; to make them understand the fuel me tering systems andassembling and dismantling internal co mbustion engines.Course Contents:Module I: Engine FundamentalsCycle analysis, fuels, and types of hydrocarbons, gasoline specifications, effect of engine parameters onperformance, carburetion, engine vehicle road performance, road performance and fuel economy.Module II: Emission and Air PollutionAutomotive emissions and their role in air pollution, photochemical smog, Chemistry of s mog format ion,Co mbustion in homogeneous mixtu res, emission formation, Inco mplete combustion format ion of Hydrocarbons(HC), carbon mono xide and o xides of nitrogen, Aldehyde emissions of unregulated toxic pollutants such asbenzene, 1, 3, butadiene etc.Module IIIInfluence of engine design and operating parameters on S.I. engine exhaust emissions. HydrocarbonEvaporative Emissions, Various sources and method of their control, Can isters for controlling evaporativeemissions, emission control system for S.I. engines, Blo w by control closed PCV system, Reduction of exhaustemissions / Various methods, fuels system design.Module IV: Exhaust Treatment devicesAir injection into exhaust system, Thermal reactors, Catalytic converters. Stratified charge engines, HondaCVCC engine.Diesel engine emissions: Source of emissions during combustion, Effect of Air injection timing on performanceand formation. D.I. and I.D.I. engines emissions, Diesel s moke, PM and RSPM emission.Module VMethods of reducing emission, Exhaust gas re-circulation s moke emission form diesel engines , Particu lateTraps, Continuous regeneration Traps (CRT).Emission fro m CNG and LPG engines. Emission Instruments: Non -dispersive infrared analy zer, Gaschromatography, Flame ion izat ion Detector, Chemilu minescent analyser.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: R.P. Sharma and M.L. Mathur, “Internal Co mbustion Engine”, Dhanpat Rai Pu blications V. Ganeshan, “Internal Co mbustion Engine”, Tata McGraw HillReferences: Angli M Course., “Automotive Engines”, CBS Publications Harper, “Fuel Systems Emission Control”, CBS Publications
    • QUALITY CONTROL AND QUALITY ASSURANCECourse Code: BTM 801 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:In engineering and manufacturing, quality control and quality assurance is a set of measures taken to ensure thatdefective product or services are not produced, and that the design meets performance requirements. Courseincludes the regulation of the quality of raw materials, assemblies, products and components; services related toproduction; and management, production, and inspection processes.Course Contents:Module I: IntroductionMeaning of Quality and quality imp rovement, need of Quality, Statistical methods for quality control, Processcapability.Module II: Quality ControlStatistical Quality Control, control charts, Control charts for attributes & variables, Moving average chart.Module III: Producti on ControlAcceptance Sampling, OC curve, Samp ling Plan, Producer‟ risk, Consumer‟s risk, Average Quality Level,AOQL, Design of Single & double sampling plan.Module IV: Quality AssuranceNeed of Quality Assurance, Quality Audit, Concept of Zero defect, ISO 9000 quality systems, total qualitymanagement.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: EL Grant & RS Leavenworth, “Statistical Quality Control”, McGraw Hill & Co. M. Mahajan, “Statistical Quality Control”, Dhanpat Rai & Co. O.P. Khanna, “Statistical Quality Control”, Dhanpat Rai & Co. R.C. Gupta, “Statistical Quality Control”, Khanna PulishersReferences: Amitav Mitra, “Fundamentals of Quality Control”, Pearson Education Feigenbaum, “Total Quality Control”, McGraw Hill & Co. Suresh Dalela, “Quality Systems”, Standard Publishers & Distributors Montgomery DC, “Introduction to Statistical Quality Control”, John Wiley & Sons Inc. Stephan B. Vardeman, J Marcus Jobe, “Statistical QA Methods for Engineers”, John Wiley & Sons Inc. Taylor J.R., “Quality Control systems”, McGraw Hill Int. Education K.C. Arora, “Total Quality Management”, S.K. Kataria & Sons.
    • REFRIGERATION AND AIR CONDITIONINGCourse Code: BTM 802 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:The aim of this course is to provide the students with the understanding of the basic principles of Refrigerationand Air Conditioning such that they could build simp le mathemat ical models representing the conditioned spaceand its components used to control environmental conditions. The application of thermodynamics, heat transfer,and fluid mechanics includes an understanding of refrigerants and refrigerat ion systems, psychometrics, hu mancomfo rt and air quality, calculation of heating and cooling loads, and heat and mass transfer processes andassociated R & A C co mponents and systems.Course Contents:Module I: Refrigerati onAir refrigeration systems, air cycle refrigeration of aircraft, various compression refrigerat ion cycles, basiccomponents of the plant.Module IIProperties and choice of refrigerants, Eco-friendly refrigerants mu ltiple co mpression and evaporation system,cascading.Module IIIVapour absorption cycle, electrolu x system steam jet refrigeration, vortex tube, application of refrigerationsystems cascading, vapour absorption cycleModule IV: Air-conditioningPsychometric processes, applied psychometr ic, co mfort air-condition ing, ventilation requirements, cooling anddehumidification system, estimat ion of cooling and heating loads, air handling, air distribution, duct design,industrial air conditioning.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References: CP Arora, Refrigeration and Condit ioning, Tata McGraw Hill Manohar Prasad, Refrigeration and Conditioning , Wiley Eastern Limited Jordan and Priester, Refrigerat ion and Conditioning, Prentice Hall of India WF Stoecker, Refrigeration and Conditioning, McGraw Hill.
    • REFRIGERATION AND AIR-CONDITIONING LABCourse Code: BTM 820 Credit Units: 01Course Contents:List of Experime nts:1. Study of refrigeration testing.2. Study of Air-Conditioning testing.3. To calculate the COP of Refrigerator.4. Study of effect of superheating.5. To calculate the efficiency of Co mpressor.6. To calculate total Heat Load for Air-Conditioning unit.7. To calculate the COP of Heat Pu mp.Examination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.
    • ADVANCED METHODS OF MANUFACTURINGCourse Code: BTM 803 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:The aim of the course is to provide the students with the understanding of the basic principles underlying thedesign, analysis, and synthesis of robotic sys tems plus machine vision technology in automation. In particu lar,the course will start fro m simp le problem in transformations, kinematics and inverse kinematics, dynamics andcontrol. Later in the semester more co mplex problems in sensing, force control, mob ile robots and robotprogramming will be discussed.Course Contents:Module I: Ki nematics Analysis of RobotMatrix algebra or coordinate transformation, kinemat ics analysis; geometric and dynamic analysis of robotman ipulators.Module II: Robot ControlRobot Control, Robot Vision, RobotControlled, CNNC, Pathplanning, Obstruction AvoidanceModule III: Material HandlingCo mputer aided Materials Management-inventory control, materials requirements planning. Co mputerControlled parts handling and equipments.Module IV: Automation ProtocolManufacturing Automation protocol, cross functional implementation Technology for system integration.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: Raghuvanshi, Manufacturing Process. P.N. Rao, Manufacturing Technology, TMH publicationsReferences: Hazra-Chowdhary , Workshop Technology R.K. Jain, Production Engineering
    • GEAR TECHNOLOGYCourse Code: BTM 804 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:The objective of gear technology is to provide information on gears, gear manufacturing, and the gear industryin general. This course includes informat ion about hobbing, shaping, shaving, broaching and other gearmanufacturing processes. It also covers gear design, gear engineering and related topicsCourse Contents:Module I: Introduction to gearsTypes of gears, Geo metric and Kinetics characteristics, Undercutting and interference-correction, Non-Circulargears.Module II: Gear designDesign of tools to make gear teeth, Kinds and cases of gear failures, Special Design Problems; Center distanceproblem, profile modification.Module III: Gear trainsProblem Co mbined bending and Torsion of pinions with large length to diameter rat io, high speed gearing.Geneva Mechanisms (Analysis & Synthesis),Gear Trains (Analysis & Synthesis)Module IV: Gear Set designSome examp le of optimal kinemat ics system Design; Gear Set design Design of sub-system consisting ofGeneva wheel and elliptical gears for reduction of maximu m acceleration of the wheel.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: D.W. Dudley, “Practical Gear Design”, Tata McGraw Hill Co. Inc. S.S. Rattan, “Theory of Machines”, Tata McGraw Hill, 2000References: AGMA (A merican Gear Manufacturing Association) Standards
    • ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND ROBOTICSCourse Code: BTM 805 Credit Units: 03Course Objective:To develop semantic-based and context-aware systems to acquire, organise, process, share and use theknowledge embedded in multimed ia content. Research will aim to maximise automation of the completeknowledge lifecycle and achieve semantic interoperability between Web resources and services. The field ofRobotics is a multi discip linary as robots are amazingly comp lex system comprising mechanical, electrical,electronic H/W and S/W and issues germane to all these.Course Contents:Module I: Scope of AIGames, theorem proving, natural language processing, vision and speech processing, robotics, expert s ystems,AI techniques- search knowledge, abstraction.Problem solvingState space search; Production systems, search space control: depth -first, breadth-first search, heuristic search -Hill climb ing, best-first search, branch and bound. Problem Reduction, Constraint Satisfaction End, Means -EndAnalysisModule II: Knowledge Representati onPredicate Logic: Unificat ion, modus ponens, resolution, dependency directed backtracking. Rule based Systems:Forward reasoning: conflict resolution, backward reasoning: use of no backtracks.Structured Knowledge Representation: Semantic Nets: slots, exceptions and default frames, conceptualdependency, scripts.Expert SystemsNeed and justification for expert systems, knowledge acquisition, Case studies: M YCIN, RI.Learn ing: Concept of learn ing, learning automat ion, genetic algorith m, learning by inductions, neural nets.Module III: Mani pulator kinematicsKinemat ics: Introduction, solvability, algebraic solution by reduction to polynomial, standard frames,repeatability and accuracy, co mputational considerations.Module IV: Mani pulator dynamicsIntroduction, acceleration of rigid body, mass distribution, Newton‟s equation, Euler‟s equation, IterativeNewton-Euler dynamic formu lation, closed dynamic equation, Lagrangian formulation of manipulatordynamics, dynamic simu lation, co mputational consideration.Module V: Trajectory GenerationIntroduction, general considerations in path description and generation, joint space schemes, Cartesian spaceschemes, Path generation in runtime, Planning path using dynamic model.Module VI: Linear control of mani pulatorsIntroduction, feedback and closed loop control, second order linear systems, control of second -order systems,Trajectory fo llo wing control, modeling and control of a sin gle joint, sensor and vision system.Robot Programming languages & systems: Introduction, the three level of robot programming, requirements ofa robot programming language, problems peculiar to robot programming languages.Examination Scheme:Components A CT S/V/Q HA EEWeightage (% ) 5 10 8 7 70CT: Class Test, HA: Ho me Assignment, S/ V/ Q: Seminar/ Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:AttendanceText & References:Text: E. Rich and K. Knight, “Artificial intelligence”, TM H, 2nd ed., 1992. N.J. Nilsson, “Principles of AI”, Narosa Publ. House, 1990. John J. Craig, “Introduction to Robotics”, Addison Wesley publication Richard D. Klafter, Tho mas A. Ch mielewski, Michael Negin, “Robotic Engineering – An integrated approach”, PHI Publicat ion
    •  Tsuneo Yoshikawa, “Foundations of Robotics”, PHI Publication References: D.W. Patterson, “Introduction to AI and Expert Systems”, PHI, 1992. Peter Jackson, “Introduction to Expert Systems”, AWP, M.A., 1992. R.J. Schalko ff, “Artificial Intelligence - an Engineering Approach”, McGraw Hill Int. Ed., Singapore, 1992. M. Sasiku mar, S. Ramani, “Rule Based Expert Systems”, Narosa Publishing House, 1994.
    • ADVANCED METHODS OF MANUFACTURING LABCourse Code: BTM 821 Credit Units: 01Course Contents:1. Practice of part programming and operations of i) Turning Center. ii) Machin ing Center.2. Tool planning and selection for i) Turning Center. ii) Machin ing Center.3. Tool Design for a plastic co mponent. i) Core and Cav ity Extraction of Industrial switch Knob. ii) Gating Design.4. Assembly of various die components for the above.5. Pattern design for a casting component i) Cope and Drag design of a butterfly valve. ii) Gating design.6. Assembly of various pattern components for the above.7. Generation of G and M codes for the above assemblies and electrodes.8. Programming and study of Robots for material handling.Examination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva.
    • GEAR TECHNOLOGY LABCourse Code: BTM 822 Credit Units: 01Course Contents:List of Experime nts:1. To study the different elements of Worm Gear.2. To study the different elements of Bevel Gear.3. To study the different elements of Helical Gear.4. To study the Differential Gear System.5. Calculation of train rat io and velocity rat io for co mpound Gear6. Calculation of train rat io and velocity rat io for Sun and Planet Gear.Examination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva
    • ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND ROBOTICS LABCourse Code: BTM 823 Credit Units: 01Course Contents:Name of Experiments:1. Robot Arm (Model 1055)2. Write a prolog program to define a relations knowledge base as follows : Assume the following in the kbase : Male (person), female (person), husband (person, person0, wife(person, person), fat her (person, person), mother (person, person). Define the predicates for Parent Brother Sister Grandfather Ancestor3. Write a prolog program to simulate a non determin istic finite automat ion (NFA)4. A computer system accepts a user‟s name and password which are stored as facts in the kbase. Validate this information through a predicate login. If not valid, d isplay a suitable message.5. Write prolog predicates to perform list man ipulation as follows : List membership relat ion Length of a list Concatenate 2 list to produce a third list Reverse a list Subset of a list Appending an element to a list Summing the element of a list6. Write a prolog program to imp lement Depth first search algorith m.7. Write a prolog program to simulate the Towers of Hanoi problem.8. There is a gold treasure hidden inside a cave. The cave is a maze of galleries connecting different rooms in which there are dangerous beings like monsters and robbers. The gold treasure is all in one roo m. Determine a route by which a person can get to the treasure and escape with it unhurt. Enclosed is a photocopy of the cave lay out. Write the corresponding prolog program.9. Write a prolog program to simulate the xor logic circu it. In this program make use of the predicate definit ions for AND, NOT and OR gate.10. A hungry monkey finds himself in a roo m in wh ich a bunch of bananas is hanging from the ceiling. The monkey cannot reach the bananas. In the room there is a chair and a stick. The ceiling is just the right height so that a monkey standing on a chair could knock the bananas down with the stick. The monkey knows how to move around, carry other things around, reach for the bananas and wave a stick in the air. Write prolog predicate that define the monkey‟s legal moves, the different legal states and enable the monkey to got to the bananas.11. In the block world problem, assure a sequence of 3 blocks a, b, c on a table. Write prolog predicates to define valid states in the blocks world domain and also to define valid legal moves in the system.Examination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35Note: IA –Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR – Lab Record, V – Viva
    • COMMUNICATION SKILLS - VICourse Code: BTM 841 Credit Units: 01Course Objective:The modules are designed to enhance the communicative co mpetence of the learners to equip them withefficient interpersonal co mmunication.Course Contents:Module I: Dynamics of Group DiscussionIntroduction,MethodologyRole FunctionsMannerismGu idelinesModule II: Communicati on through Electronic ChannelsIntroductionTechnology based Co mmunication ToolsVideo ConferencingWeb ConferencingSelection of the Effective ToolE-mails, Fax etc.Module III: Effecti ve Public S peakingTypesEssentialsSuccess in Public SpeakingDos and Don‟tsExamination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 CAF V GD GP AWeightage (% ) 20 20 25 10 10 10 5CAF – Co mmun ication Assessment FileGD – Group DiscussionGP – Group PresentationText & References: Jermy Co mfort, Speaking Effectively, et.al, Cambridge Krishnaswamy, N, Creat ive English for Co mmun ication, Macmillan Raman Prakash, Business Co mmunication, Oxford. Taylor, Conversation in Pract ice,
    • BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCE - VIII (PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL EXCELLENCE)Course Code: BTM 843 Credit Units: 01Course Objective:Importance of Personal and Professional excellenceInculcating the components of excellenceCourse Contents:Module I: Components of ExcellencePersonal Excellence:Identifying long-term choices and goalsUncovering the talent, strength & styleAnalyzing choke points in your personal processes by analysis in area of p lacements, events, seminars,conference, extracurricular activ ities, projects etc.Module II: Managing Personal Effecti venessSetting goals to maintain focusDimensions of personal effectiveness (self disclosure, openness to feedback and perceptiveness)Integration of personal and organizational vision fo r effectivenessA healthy balance of work and playManaging Stress creatively and productivelyModule III: Personal Success StrategyTime managementHandling criticis m and interruptionsDealing with difficult peopleMapping and evaluating the situationsIdentifying long-term goalsModule IV: Positi ve Personal GrowthUnderstanding & Developing positive emotionsPositive approach towards futureResilience during loss and challengeModule V: Professional SuccessBuilding independence & interdependenceReducing resistance to changeContinued reflect ion (Placements, events, seminars, conferences, projects extracurricular Activit ies etc.)Module VI: End-of-Semester AppraisalViva based on personal journalAssessment of Behavioural change as a result of train ingExit Level Rating by Self and ObserverExamination Scheme:Components SAP A Mi d Term VIVA Journal for Test (CT) Success (JOS)Weightage (% ) 20 05 20 30 25
    • FRENCH - VIIICourse Code: BTM 844 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:Provide students with the necessary linguistic tools to face up to different situations of communication to enhance their capacity in oral/written co mprehension/expressionCourse Contents:Module B: Unités 4, 5, 6: PP. 48 - 86Contenu lexical: Uni té 4: 1. Présenter une information/les circonstances d‟un événement 2. Exp rimer la possibilité/la probabilité 3. Exp rimer une quantité indéfin ie 4. Co mprendre et raconter un fait d iv Unité 5 : 1. Parler d‟une passion, d‟une aventure 2. Choisir/créer 3. Exp rimer la surpirse/des sentiments Unité 6 : 1. Exp rimer la cause et la conséquence 2. Exp rimer la crainte et rassurer 3. Faire une démonstrationContenu grammatical: 1. la construction passive 2. la fo rme impersonnelle 3. l‟interrogation 4. les adjectifs et les pronoms indéfinis 5. les pronoms interrogatifs et démonstratifs 6. la construction avec deux prono ms 7. le subjonctif dans l‟expression des sentiments, de la crainte, du but 8. constructions permettant l‟exp ression de la cause et de la conséquence 9. l‟enchaînement des idées : succession et oppositionExamination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: le livre à suivre : Campus: To me 2
    • GERMAN - VIIICourse Code: BTM 845 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:To enable the students to converse, read and write in the language with the help of the basic rules of grammar,which will later help them to strengthen their language.To give the students an insight into the culture, geography, political situation and economic opportunitiesavailable in GermanyIntroduction to Advanced Grammar and Business Language and Professional JargonCourse Contents:Module I: Readi ng and comprehensionReading texts and comprehending themModule II: Information about German HistoryAcquiring information about German History through appropriate texts and storiesModule III: Bi o data/ Curriculam vi taeWriting a bio -data in the proper format with all essential componentsModule IV: Informal lettersReading and writ ing informal lettersModule V: B usiness etiquetteBusiness etiquette in Germany and types of companiesModule VI: Interview skillsTo learn to face interviewsRead a text „Interviewspiel‟Module VII: Picture DescriptionFirstly recognize the persons or things in the picture and identify the situation depicted in the picture;Secondly answer questions of general meaning in context to the picture and also talk about the personalexperiences which co me to your mind upon seeing the picture.Examination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: Wolfgang Hieber, Lern ziel Deutsch Hans-Heinrich Wangler, Sprachkurs Deutsch Schulz Griesbach, Deutsche Sprachlehre für Ausländer P.L Aneja, Deutsch Interessant- 1, 2 & 3 Rosa-Maria Dallap iazza et al, Tangram Aktuell A1/ 1,2 Braun, Nieder, Sch möe, Deutsch als Fremdsprache 1A, Grundkurs
    • SPANISH – VIIICourse Code: BTM 846 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:To enable students to deal with Spanish situations putting things in perspective, using Past Tense. Enablingthem to co mprehend and form slightly co mp lex sentences. Give students vocabulary of various situations.Course Contents:Module ISituational exercises/Picture Description:At the cineAt the Chemist‟s/HospitalModule IIAt a corporate client‟s informal/formal meeting/gatheringLooking for acco mmodationModule IIIPast Tense (Indefinido) of regular verbsPast Tense (Indefinido) of irregular verbsExercises related to the aboveModule IVPast Tense (Imperfecto)Examination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: Español En Directo I A, 1B Español Sin Fronteras Material provided by the teacher from various sources
    • JAPANESE - VIIICourse Code: BTM 847 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:To enable the students to converse in the language with the help of different fo rms as volitional forms, activeand passive voice and decision making etc.Note: The course and teaching in Ro man as well as Japanese script. Also introducing next 10 to 20 kanjis.Course Contents:Module I: Voliti onal formsExp laining the situation when one is thinking of doing something.Module II: Acti ve and Passive voiceDirect and indirect ways of speech.Module III: Plain FormsSentence patterns using plain forms of verb.Module IV: Causes and effectsExp laining causes and effects with different forms of verb.Module V: Decision makingExp ressing different occupations and how to make decision.Learning Outcome Students can speak the language and will be able to exp ress their views and opinions comfortably.Methods of Private study/ Self help Hand-outs, audio-aids, assignments and role-plays will support classroom teaching.Examination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: Shin Nihon-go no Kiso Lesson No.-36 to 40. All vocabulary and topics taught to the students are from the above mentioned book.
    • CHINESE – VIIICourse Code: BTM 848 Credit Units: 02Course Objective:Paper was first invented n China in 105 AD. It was a closely guarded secret and didn‟t reach Europe unti l the 8thCentury. The course aims at familiarizing the student with the basic aspects of speaking ability of Mandarin, thelanguage of Mainland China. The course aims at training students in practical skills and nurturing them tointeract with a Chinese person.Course Contents:Module IDrillsDialogue practiceObserve picture and answer the question.The aspect particle “le” and the modal particle “le”.Module IIOptative verbsTexts based on different topicsEnriching vocabulary by dealing with various daily scenarios and situations.Module IIISentences with subject predicate construction as its predicatePronunciation and intonationCharacter writing and stroke orderModule IVAbout china Part I Lesson 2, 3Chinese to English and English to Chinese translations fro m the news paper.Module VQuestions with an interrogative pronounEssays, writing formal letters.Conversation practice.Examination Scheme:Components CT1 CT2 C I V AWeightage (% ) 20 20 20 20 15 5C – Project + PresentationI – Interaction/Conversation PracticeText & References: “Kan tu shuo hua” Part-I Lesson 8-13
    • PROJECTCourse Code: BTM 860 Credit Units: 15MethodologyTopics of project are to be based on the latest trends, verify ing engineering concepts /principa ls and shouldinvolve elementary research work. The projects may involve design, fabrications, testing, computer modeling,and analysis of any engineering problem. On comp letion of the practical training the students are to present areport covering various aspects learnt by them and give a presentation on same.Examination Scheme:Literature study/ Fabrication/ Experimentation 40Written Report 20Viva 15Presentation 25Total 100