Common Core in the Cloud June 2013 #tic13

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Learn what standards can and cannot provide students and how to create the best educational experience possible. Understand the evolution of writing into the digital space and how this relates to how …

Learn what standards can and cannot provide students and how to create the best educational experience possible. Understand the evolution of writing into the digital space and how this relates to how you've been teaching all along. June 2013 #tic13 conference in Dubuque, Iowa

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  • Julie: Flat classroom projects have been acknowledged over the past 5 years with awards and listed as exemplary
  • Julie: Our aim is to create projects and opportunities across all levels of education. Right now we have FCP and NetGenEd for high school, Digiteen for upper ES, MS and HS, AWL for upper ES, Eracism for MS HS and our new pilot this semester is Building Bridges to Tomorrow for K-2 level – over 40 classrooms from about more than 10 countries
  • During that time, in December 2005, I began blogging at the Cool Cat Teacher blog and used my experience from the business world as a general manager as well as my teaching, professional development teaching I’ve done for adults in technology at the college level, and my experience as IT director for my school to this blog. But you see, I still view myself as the
  • Georgia Educators Technology Conference in Atlanta with a commission from my curriculum director to bring technologies back to my classroom that would enable me to better facilitiate
  • Understand that flat classrooms are based upon things you already understand – Research Based Best Practices such as differentiated instruction, authentic assessment, cooperative learning, and project based learning. The only difference is that your classroom is merged with other classrooms and your student’s partners are in other time zones and locations.
  • This is how I felt!
  • event for my classroom and I when I wrote a blog post in October 2006 called “My students weigh in on Friedman’s Flat World.”
  • Julie Lindsay, “It would be great if we could interact with your students! Would you be willing/ have the time to participate in an online debate or discussion? My students are Bangladeshi and Indian nationals and have a perspective from the ‘other side of the flat world.’”
  • She was at the International School Dhaka, Bangladesh. Her students were primarily Indian and Bangladeshi nationals who practiced the Muslim, mine, primarily Anglo Christian background.
  • In addition to the wiki, the students also created videos about their topic where that to outsource, or receive video from their partner on the other side of the world and this is the type of video that emerged.
  • “…you can’t just drop new innovations into a classroom and hope that the instructor will invent effective ways to use them. To fully utilize a new teaching technology, you often need to invent new teaching practices as well.” John Seely Brown
  • We’re not making copies in schools, we’re making originals.
  • We are working to determine the vital behaviors that will move us towards effective twenty first century classrooms. We’ll call this Flat Classroom. But I want you to remember as we look as the vital behaviors that there is one thing you can completely influence. What is the one thing you have complete and total control over in your district?
  • We’re going to talk about the cloud, but sometimes to see where we’re going, we need to see the bigger picture of where we’ve been.
  • My technology journey began somewhere around the age of 10 with the TRS-80 computer
  • These were the days of the Command Line Interface or CLI
  • We played games like this text adventure game
  • And eventually played games like this that became a little bit more graphical and really thought we had it made when we
  • Were able to play games like Monkey island
  • Then, the Graphical User Interface was invented at Xerox PARC and we began having devices like the computer I took to Georgia Tech in 1987 – the Macintosh SE
  • We had the graphical user interface
  • With a lovely little control panel like this
  • And eventually when color came along we were starting to play games like this.
  • For example, let’s take one question: where did humans originate?
  • For example, let’s take one question: where did humans originate?
  • Oscar Pistorius Olympics
  • The story of the first 'cyborg' flesh and bloodNeil Harbisson, the first human to be officially recognized as a man / machine.Due to his illness in xonsiste that fails to recognize the colors alone, he walks with a device that turns colors into sounds for him so he can know what color things, objects with which it intersects on a daily basis.He began walking with a backpack which contained a computer and now behind only one chip in the head, which transposed into everywhere, for that utlidade.http://www.luuux.com/node/3560531
  • We’re going to talk about the cloud, but sometimes to see where we’re going, we need to see the bigger picture of where we’ve been.
  • These numbers are pulled from a variety of sources including Ahmed SabbirArif, Wolfgang Stuerzlinger Analysis of Text Entry Performance Metrics Dept. of Computer Science & Engineering York University^ Karat, C.M., Halverson, C., Horn, D. and Karat, J. (1999), Patterns of entry and correction in large vocabulary continuous speech recognition systems, CHI 99 Conference Proceedings, 568-575.^ a b c Brown, C. M. (1988). Human-computer interface design guidelines. Norwood, NJ: Ablex Publishing.^ Ayres, Robert U; Martinás, Katalin (2005), "120 wpm for very skilled typist", On the Reappraisal of Microeconomics: Economic Growth and Change in a Material World, Cheltenham, UK & Northampton, Massachusetts: Edward Elgar Publishing, p. 41, ISBN 1-84542-272-4, retrieved 22 November 2010^ Typing Speed: How Fast is Average, 1997^ http://www.bigsiteofamazingfacts.com/history-of-typewriters^ http://www.owled.com/typing.htmlZiefle, M. (1998), Effects of display resolution on visual performance, Human Factors, 40(4), 555–568.^ Williams, J. R. (1998). Guidelines for the use of multimedia in instruction, Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 42nd Annual Meeting, 1447–1451^ http://www.brainyhistory.com/events/1988/may_24_1988_161209.html^ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c4-CRv0ih28http://www.lisabmarshall.com/uncategorized/how-fast-do-i-speak/On the 2006 SAT, a United States post-secondary education entrance exam, only 15 percent of the students wrote their essay answers in cursive.[7]http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/detailmini.jsp?_nfpb=true&_&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=ED056015&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=no&accno=ED056015 – Manuscript / cursive speeds
  • One drop is a drop of water. Many drops of water together make rain. Rain makes the grass grow. One person writing is one workbut multiple people make change. Change can improve our world.
  • One drop is a drop of water. Many drops of water together make rain. Rain makes the grass grow. One person writing is one workbut multiple people make change. Change can improve our world.
  • In his book Pymalion in the classroom, Dr. Robert Rosenthal of Harvard University shared his experiment from the late 1960s. Beginning of school year three teachers were called into the office and told that “because of their teaching styles you are the three best teachers in the school as a special reward we are going to give each of you one classroom of the brightest childre in the school selected based on IQ tests – we expect them to jump 20-30% in academic achievement. Keep this confidential, we don’t want anyone to know.”Teachers were psyched. They were enthusiastic. At the end of the year.
  • In his book Pymalion in the classroom, Dr. Robert Rosenthal of Harvard University shared his experiment from the late 1960s. Beginning of school year three teachers were called into the office and told that “because of their teaching styles you are the three best teachers in the school as a special reward we are going to give each of you one classroom of the brightest childre in the school selected based on IQ tests – we expect them to jump 20-30% in academic achievement. Keep this confidential, we don’t want anyone to know.”Teachers were psyched. They were enthusiastic. At the end of the year.
  • We’re too busy having a pity party to exert the influence to have a victory party.
  • So, I embed my learning and take 15 minutes 2-3 times a week to learn and explore new technologies and this, has been the thing that has led to the complete transformation of my classroom! But you don’t have time – you say.
  • How do you eat a watermelon?
  • If you eat it whole, you’ll choke.
  • No, the way you eat a watermelon is one bit at a time.
  • And that is what I suggest for you to do today. Your assignment for this webinar today is to come up with your “Big Three” at the end of the webinar. Pick three things – start there!
  • Me but we have to change me into
  • And you’ll be surprised at how quickly me turns into We!
  • Do the things that sit at hand like Thomas Carlyle said. “Our job is not to see what lies dimly at a distance, but to do what lies clearly at hand.” Investigate your next three things.
  • I can do something. I
  • Can. I can.
  • I CAN. So, angela, what can we do in our schools and classrooms today that will make a difference?

Transcript

  • 1. Common Core in the CloudWritingVicki A. DavisTeacher, IT Director@coolcatteacherCo-founder, Flat Classroom™ ProjectsAuthor, Flattening Classrooms, Engaging MindsReinventing WritingEye on EducationDecember 2013
  • 2. Collaborative ProjectContest First Place2007ISTE SIGTelOnline LearningAward Winner 2007www.flatclassroomproject.netNet GenEducation(with Don Tapscott)Eracism ProjectFlat Classroom™ConferenceThe Flat Classroom™ StoryP 1-2Short listed in 2009
  • 3. Flat Classroom®Global ProjectsFlat Classroom® ProjectDigiteen™ Project‘A Week in the Life…’ Project Gr3-5NetGenEd™ ProjectEracism™ ProjectIncubator ProgramK-2 Project Building Bridges to Tomorrow@flatclassroom@digiteen@netgened@eracismproject@flatclassroom@flatclasskidsP10-11*P11-12P13-14P12-13P13NEW!NEW!@flatclassroom*See the frameworks for each model on referenced page numbers.
  • 4. “Cool Cat Teacher”Vicki Davis
  • 5. BestPractice
  • 6. Flat Classroomhttp://flatclassroomproject.wikispaces.com
  • 7. “was its own society itself”“taught us a lesson in life”
  • 8. Student Produced VideoStudentVideo(Producer)OutsourcedVideo(Partner)FinalVideoExplainingTopic
  • 9. John Seely Brown,Visiting Scholar, University ofSouthern California“…you can’t just drop newinnovations into a classroomand hope that the instructorwill invent effective ways touse them.To fully utilize anew teaching technology, youoften need to invent newteaching practices as well.”Flat Classroom Conference 2011Beijing, China“Web 2 Kung Fu” speedsharing invented
  • 10. Engagement Theory1. Occur in a group context(i.e. collaborative teams)2. Project Based3. Authentic FocusKearsley, G. & Schneiderman, B. (1999). Engagementtheory: A framework for technology-based learningand teaching. Originally athttp://home.sprynet.com/~gkearsley/engage.htm .Retrieved 14:42, 11 September 2006 (MEST)A framework fortechnology basedteaching andlearning
  • 11. Isn’t the way we’ve always taughtgoodenough?
  • 12. Facts for your futureCaucasian white people will be the minority in the US by 2042.Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, December 20093210 11 104034 30 2819171712810 12919 21 237 10 11 100%20%40%60%80%100%There Is Growing Demand For An Increasingly Educated WorkforceWorkforce job requirements, by education level1973 1992 2007 2018GraduatedegreeSomecollegeHSdiplomaHSdropoutsAssociate’sdegreeBachelor’sdegree
  • 13. Bloom’s Revised TaxonomyCreatingEvaluatingAnalyzingApplyingUnderstandingRememberinghttp://ww2.odu.edu/educ/roverbau/Bloom/blooms_taxonomy.htmHOTS(Higher orderthinking skills)LOTS(Lowerorderthinkingskills)
  • 14. Do you see anynumbers?
  • 15. Source: "Tough Choices or Tough Times" 2007, National center on education and the economyLOTS(Lower orderthinking skills)HOTS(Higher orderthinking skills)
  • 16. What is lacking?HOTS(Higher orderthinkingskills)LOTS(Lower orderthinking skills)
  • 17. Essential skills for goodmanagersHOTS(Higher orderthinking skills)
  • 18. HOTS(Higher orderthinking skills)LOTS(Lower ordethinking skills
  • 19. LOTS can crowd outHOTS “The more education a child had beenallowed to have before his/her handwritingwas changed over to cursive …the larger hisor her vocabulary was …the kids who’dbeen required to do the least cursive hadvocabularies THREE TIMES the size of thosewho’d been required to do the mostcursive.”Kate Gladstone, Handwriting that worksAs quoted in http://georgecouros.ca/blog/archives/1758You mustchoose whatto include.
  • 20. LOTS can crowd out HOTS
  • 21. 20% time projectSee http://westwood.wikispaces.com/2012+Computer+Fundamentals+Projects
  • 22. 20% time projectSee http://westwood.wikispaces.com/2012+Computer+Fundamentals+Projects
  • 23. Engagement Theory1. Occur in a group context(i.e. collaborative teams)2. Project Based3. Authentic FocusKearsley, G. & Schneiderman, B. (1999). Engagementtheory: A framework for technology-based learningand teaching. Originally athttp://home.sprynet.com/~gkearsley/engage.htm .Retrieved 14:42, 11 September 2006 (MEST)A framework fortechnology basedteaching andlearning
  • 24. Authentic FocusPassion (PQ)Curiosity (CQ)
  • 25. Man from Bangladesh onmy plane“This is your last generationof prosperity because noneof you want to work. Myfriends and I are cominghere and taking all yourjobs. Enjoy your life.”
  • 26. Man from Bangladesh onmy plane“This is your last generationof prosperity because noneof you want to work. Myfriends and I are cominghere and taking all yourjobs. Enjoy your life.”
  • 27. Just a high school degree with rotememorization will not createsuccess!
  • 28. IQ x (CQ+PQ)+HQ =success!
  • 29. Intelligence multiplied byCuriosity and Passionand added togood work Habits =success!
  • 30. Why do we even care aboutflatteningOur classrooms?
  • 31. The FACTS of 21st century life.Successful people will have towork with and market toChina, India, and
  • 32. 3 disruptions in history ofeducation1. Phonetic Alphabet2. Mass produced books3. Networked computersDavid ThornburgMobile Learning and the Disruption of Educationhttp://www.tcse-k12.org/pages/disruptive.pdfThings that SHOULDfundamentallychanged how weteach
  • 33. CLI – Command Line Interface
  • 34. Then we played games like….
  • 35. Eventually we played games like…
  • 36. No Common Interfaces in the 1980’s
  • 37. COMMAND STUDENT INTERFACE
  • 38. GUI –Graphical User Interface
  • 39. Common Interfaces in 1990’sUSBProgrammingLanguages
  • 40. What kinds of things interface intoday’s classroom?StudentsTextbooks/eBooksAppsComputersSchoolsTeachersWebsites
  • 41. No Common Interface/ OutputStudentsTextbooks/eBooksAppsComputersSchoolsTeachersWebsites
  • 42. MOOCs will take off when…“once student behaviordatabases enable feedbackcycles”According to Udacity and Edxhttp://theconversation.edu.au/digital-dawn-open-online-learning-is-just-beginning-7758Massive OpenOnline Course
  • 43. GRAPHICAL STUDENT INTERFACEPretty but it doesn’t communicate well with others.
  • 44. How will we allow all of thesebeautiful graphical tools to interact?
  • 45. How will all of the tools in educationinterface?
  • 46. StrengthsAllow you to programcommon INTERFACESAllow communication &SYNERGY between differenttools and teachersIf you don’t know whereyou’re going how will youknow when you’re there?
  • 47. UNFAIR to handstudents TESTS thatare a surprise.
  • 48. Weaknesses• You get what you measure"Perhaps what you measure is what youget. More likely, what you measure is allyou’ll get. What you don’t (or can’t)measure is lost" –H. Thomas Johnson"the most important figures that oneneeds for management are unknown orunknowable,but successful management mustnevertheless take account of them."W. Edwards Deming(from Out of the Crisis, p121)
  • 49. Weaknesses• Standards, by naturegravitate towards LowerOrder Thinking Skills
  • 50. LOTS can crowd out HOTS
  • 51. Classrooms havemicroclimates too!
  • 52. Weaknesses• You get what you measure• Standards gravitate, by naturetowards LOTS• LOTS can easily crowd out HOTS• Lack of flexibility for uniqueclassroom needs• Who controls the standards?• Semantic confusion
  • 53. We’ve politicized what we teach
  • 54. Where didhumansoriginate?
  • 55. PanspermiaElectric SparkDeep Sea VentsRNA WorldCommunityClayA CreatorT H E O R I E S
  • 56. The semantics ofstandards, theories, andlaws Just because a theory is a standard to betaught doesn’t make that theory into a LAW. Majority doesn’t rule in science. Just because most people think it doesn’tmake it true. A human law cannot change the laws ofscience.
  • 57. GalileoEverydiscoverybegan withjust oneperson whothought itto be true.
  • 58. To overcome Weaknesses• You get what you measure– Must MEASURE HOTS• Efolios• passion projects• Define what HOTs looks like in a school.• Celebrate creativity• Creativity Competitions• Requirements to collaborate• Standards gravitate, by naturetowards LOTS– Create “HOT” standards ofBEHAVIORS we want to seehappening
  • 59. To overcome Weaknesses• LOTS can easily crowd outHOTS– Make room for creativity (i.e.20% time project)• Lack of flexibility for uniqueclassroom needs– Teacherpreneurship– Expect customization
  • 60. To overcome Weaknesses• Who controls the standards?– Be inclusive andcomprehensive of importanttheories regardless of yourpersonal opinion– Guard standard makers frompolitical influence• Semantic Issues– Be careful to define terms:standards, theories, and laws
  • 61. NUI- NATURAL USER INTERFACE
  • 62. GOOGLE’SPROJECT GLASS
  • 63. http://techcrunch.com/2012/06/28/how-google-pulled-off-their-live-video-skydiving-with-glasses-demo/COOLEST GOOGLE HANGOUT EVER
  • 64. A voice-activated school?
  • 65. Humans and High Tech Equipment aremerging
  • 66. BUIBIOLOGIC USER INTERFACENeil Harbisson –First Human“cyborg”
  • 67. How many words per minute?050100150200250300350Min AvgMax Avg
  • 68. Typical Progression in Handwriting formany schoolsPrint Denilian CursiveTouchTyping
  • 69. Types of WritingNarrative• Biographical• Fictional• PersonalExpository• Compare -Contrast• How- to• InformativePersuasive• Opinion• Problem-Solution• Pro-conResponsetoLiterature• CharacterSketch• PlotSummary• ThemeAnalysisResearch• ResearchReporthttp://www.greatsource.com/iwrite/students/s_forms.html
  • 70. Typical Academic AuthorshipOne DocumentOne Author
  • 71. Collaborative AuthorshipOne DocumentAuthor 1 Author 2 Author 3 Author 4
  • 72. I’ve got “me” but where’s the “we?”Typical Person inwritingSingularFirst Person “I”2nd Person “you”Third Person“he/she/it”PluralFirst Person “We”2nd Person “you”3rd Person “They”
  • 73. WHAT IS COLLABORATIVE WRITING?WHAT IS “THE CLOUD?”The process of writing, editing, and producing with a group of people.
  • 74. Dr. Justin Reich @bjfr• “Only 11% of wikis have any form of studentcollaboration and only 2-3% of wikis could becalled ‘highly collaborative.’”• “Giving students access to collaborativeplatforms doesn’t mean they will collaborate.”http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/edtechresearcher
  • 75. Types of writing on typical wikisvia Dr. Justin Reich1. Concatenation– discrete content– Students don’t touch each other’s work2. Copy Editing– Edit grammar, punctuation, syntax or spelling3. Co construction– Substantively edit text of another studentthrough addition, deletion replacementAs quoted inChapter 1: Reinventing WritingBy Vicki Davis @eyeoneducationFall 2013
  • 76. Types of writing on typical wikisvia Dr. Justin Reich4. Commenting– Conversational move– Doesn’t contribute to wiki content5. Discussion– Comment back and forth on a topic with at leastfour conversational turns.As quoted inChapter 1: Reinventing WritingBy Vicki Davis @eyeoneducationFall 2013
  • 77.  Fosters community (Elbow 373) Helps see problems from multiple viewpoints (Howard 10) Co-authoring impacts the writing of individual authors (Aghbar) Improves Learning Experiences (wolf 2010) “Ideal model for constructing, reorganizing and acquiring newinformation” (Janssen et all 2010) Global collaboration is essential in today’s workplace (Friedman) Shorten time required to solve pressing world problems (Tapscott)Benefits of Collaborative WritingHong Kong 2011Students edit wiki with virtual partners
  • 78. People = Problems(Trouble)
  • 79. Troubleshootingis HOT
  • 80. PERFECTIONis not
  • 81. WHAT IS COLLABORATIVEWRITING?The process ofwriting, editing, and producing with agroup of people.
  • 82. http://tinyurl.com/kindle-notecard
  • 83. The Collaborative Writing Cloud 9WikisCollaborativeWriting AppsBlogsSocialBookmarkingGraphicOrganizersCollaborativeNotebooksePaperCartooningCloudSyncing
  • 84. Community of Practice• “communities of practice are formed bypeople who engage in a process of collectivelearning in a shared domain of humanendeavor.” (Lave and Wegner)
  • 85. Community of Practice• “communities of practice are formed bypeople who engage in a process of collectivelearning in a shared domain of humanendeavor.” (Lave and Wegner)
  • 86. Be transparent with your studentsSuzie Nestico @nesticos
  • 87. Common Core Writing StandardsSummarizedText types andpurposes• W.x.1 Write arguments• W.x.2 Write informative/ explanatory texts.• W.x.3 Write narrativesProduction andDistribution ofWriting• W.x.4 Production and distribution• W.x.5 Develop and strengthen writing• W.x.6 Use technologyResearch tobuild andpresentknowledge• W.x.7 Conduct research projects• W.x.8 Gather relevant information• W.x.9 Draw evidenceRange of Writing• W.x.10 Write over varied time frames for a varietyof tasks, purposes and audienceshttp://www.corestandards.org/the-standards/english-language-arts-standards
  • 88. You can integrateCommon Core Plan ahead Write over extendedperiods Customize the classroom FLIP and FLATTEN Go paperless
  • 89. So…What will we dowithstandards?
  • 90. Don’t…Let theCommon Corebecome thecommonbore!
  • 91. LOTS can crowd out HOTS
  • 92. “Santa’s Motto” in mychildhood home“If youbelieveyoureceive.”
  • 93. Study of Expectations• 20% of students in the student were said tohave “unusual potential for intellectualgrowth”• Three teachers selected were told they wereselected because they were the best in theschoolRosenthal, R., and Jacobson, L. (1968). Pygmalion in the classroom: Teacherexpectation and pupils intellectual development. New York: Rinehart andWinston.
  • 94. At the end of the school year• Led the school and district in standardized testscores• Jumped 20-30% in academic achievementover previous year.Rosenthal, R., and Jacobson, L. (1968). Pygmalion in theclassroom: Teacher expectation and pupils intellectualdevelopment. New York: Rinehart and Winston.
  • 95. Guess what?• The selections were RANDOM.– Students were a mix of good/bad/ medium.– So were teachers!Rosenthal, R., and Jacobson, L. (1968). Pygmalion in the classroom: Teacherexpectation and pupils intellectual development. New York: Rinehart andWinston.
  • 96. You Believe, You Receive!“In experiment after experiment, it has beendemonstrated that when teachers EXPECT theirstudents to perform well, the students workhard and live up to their teacher’s expectations.”Brian Tracy, Maximum Achievement
  • 97. The most important “A”in your classroomAtt-I-tude
  • 98. 15 minutes2-3 times a week
  • 99. Eat awatermelon
  • 100. Notwhole!
  • 101. Smallbites!
  • 102. The power of Three!Pick three
  • 103. Thomas Carlyle“Our job is not to seewhat lies dimly at adistance, but to dowhat lies clearly athand.”
  • 104. CAN
  • 105. CAN
  • 106. Who am I?TEACHER
  • 107. Common Core in the CloudWritingVicki A. DavisTeacher, IT Director@coolcatteacherCo-founder, Flat Classroom™ ProjectsAuthor, Flattening Classrooms, Engaging MindsThe Essential Collaborative Writing GuideBookEye on EducationDecember 2012