Memos

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Memos

  1. 1. Memos<br />
  2. 2. What are memos?<br />Memos are internal documents that, for example, announce policies, disseminate information, delegate responsibilities, instruct employees, and report results. <br />They provide a record of decisions made and actions taken.<br />Managers use memos to inform and motivate employees. <br />
  3. 3. Types of Memos<br />Each memo is written for a specific purpose to a specific audience. The purpose and audience for your memo will help guide what type of memo you will write. <br />There are three basic reasons to write a memo: <br />1. to persuade action <br />2. to issue a directive <br />3. or to provide a report. <br />
  4. 4. Writing Memos<br />Memos should be both concise and adequately developed. Adequate development of one’s thoughts is crucial to the memo’s clarity.<br />
  5. 5. Example<br />ABRUPT: Be more careful on the loading dock.<br />DEVELOPED: To prevent accidents on the loading dock, follow these procedures:<br />Check…<br />Load only…<br />Replace…<br />
  6. 6. Writing Style and Tone<br />Use a relatively formal, impersonal and direct tone when writing a memo to a subordinate unless you are trying to reassure or praise. <br />Avoid being too formal, sprinkling your writing with stuffy words that may seem stuffy and pompous. <br />
  7. 7. Writing Style and Tone<br />Example: <br />It has been decided that the office will be open the day after thanksgiving.<br />Example: <br />The office will be open the day after thanksgiving. <br />
  8. 8. Writing Style and Tone<br />Make sure to subordinate the bad news by focusing on the reasoning behind the decision to work.<br />Example: <br />Because we must meet the December 15 deadline to be eligible for the government contract, the office will be open the day after Thanksgiving.<br />
  9. 9. Lists and Headings<br />Lists can give impact to important points that make it easier for readers to quickly, grasp information; however, do not overuse lists as it is difficult for the reader to understand because it forces the reader to connect the separate or disjoined items on the memo. <br />
  10. 10. Lists and Headings<br />Headings are another attention getting device, particularly in long memos as they divide the material into manageable segments, call attention to main topics, and signal a shift in topic.<br />
  11. 11. Closings<br />A memo closing can accomplish many important tasks such as building positive relationships with readers, encouraging colleagues and employees, and letting recipients know what you will do or what you expect of them. <br />Example: I will discuss the problem with the marketing consultant and let you know by Monday what we are able to change. <br />
  12. 12. Closings<br />Although routine statements (“Thanks again for your help”) are sometimes unavoidable, make your closing work for you by providing specific prompts to which the reader can respond. <br />Example: If you would like further information, such as a copy of the questionnaire we used, please e-mail me at delgado@prn.com.<br />
  13. 13. Signature<br />The final step is signing or initialing a memo, a practice that lets readers know that you approve of its contents. <br />Where you sign or initial the memo depends on the practice of your organization<br />
  14. 14. Persuasive Memo<br />Role: Head of the HR Department<br />Problem: Many employees have difficulties operating the copier machine. Because of its constant paper jams and uneven ink output, the copier machine is a daily source of problems. As a result, numerous complaints have been lodged to your office.<br />
  15. 15. Persuasive Memo<br />Proposed Solution:<br />Seminar on proper operation of a copier machine conducted by XXX Copy Company.<br />
  16. 16. Format and Design<br />1. HeaderThe header is a compact block of information at the top of a memo.  Different offices may prefer different layouts, but in general you should use an arrangement like the following:<br />
  17. 17. Professional Publishing Services<br />TO: Barbara Smith, Publication Manager<br />From: Hannah Kaufman, Vice President HK<br />To: and From:  In general, omit titles such as Professor or Mr., but follow the style your organization prefers.  Write your initials after your name on the "From" line.<br />
  18. 18. Professional Publishing Services<br />TO: Barbara Smith, Publication Manager<br />FROM: Hannah Kaufman, Vice President HK<br />DATE: October 14, 2010<br />Date: Spell it out.  In some countries "12/01/98" means "December 1, 1998," but in others it means "12 January, 1998."<br />
  19. 19. Professional Publishing Services<br />TO: Barbara Smith, Publication Manager<br />FROM: Hannah Kaufman, Vice President HK<br />DATE: October 14, 2010<br />SUBJECT: Need for New Memo Format<br />Subject: Be specific. Capitalize all major words in the subject line, except articles, prepositions, and conjunction with fewer than five letters unless they are the first and last words.<br />
  20. 20. Opening Segment<br />The gist of a memo should occur in the opening sentences/paragraphs. It's a good idea to include:<br />The context <br /> The context is the event, circumstance, or background of the problem you are solving or the directive you are giving. <br /> Include only what your reader needs and be sure it is clear.  <br />
  21. 21. The Context<br />I’ve noticed that we don’t seem to be able to communicate important changes, requirements and progress reports throughout the company as effectively as we should. <br />
  22. 22. Opening Segment<br />The gist of a memo should occur in the opening sentences/paragraphs. It's a good idea to include:<br />2. the task <br />A statement that describes what you are doing to deal with a situation. <br />
  23. 23. The Task<br /> I’ve noticed that we don’t seem to be able to communicate important changes, requirements and progress reports throughout the company as effectively as we should. I propose developing one consistent memo format, recognizable by all staff as the official means of communicating company directives.<br />
  24. 24. Discussion Segment<br />The discussion segments are the parts in which you get to include all the juicy details that support your ideas. Keep two things in mind:<br />Begin with the information that is most important. This may mean that you will start with key findings or recommendations. <br />Start with your most general information and move to your specific or supporting facts. <br />For easy reading, put important points or details into lists rather than paragraphs when possible. <br />Be careful to make lists parallel in grammatical form. <br />
  25. 25. Discussion Segment<br /> I’ve noticed that we don’t seem to be able to communicate important changes, requirements and progress reports throughout the company as effectively as we should. I propose developing one consistent memo format, recognizable by all staff as the official means of communicating company directives.<br /> While I know this seems like a simple solution, I believe it will cut down on needless e-mail, improve universal communication and allow the staff to save necessary information for later referral.<br />
  26. 26. Closing Segment<br />You're almost done. After the reader has read your information, you want to close with a courteous ending stating what action you want your reader to take. <br />Make sure you consider how the reader will benefit from the desired actions and how you can make those actions easier. For example, you might say, "I will be glad to discuss this recommendation with you and follow through on any decisions you make."<br />
  27. 27. Closing Segment<br /> Please talk among yourselves to determine the proper points of memo writing and return the input to me by 12 noon. I will then send out a notice to the entire staff regarding the new memo format. <br /> Thank you for your prompt attention to this.<br />
  28. 28. Persuasive Memorandum<br /> TO: Barbara Smith, Publication Manager<br /> FROM: Hannah Kaufman, Vice President HK<br /> DATE: October 14, 2010<br /> SUBJECT: Need for New Memo Format <br /> I’ve noticed that we don’t seem to be able to communicate important changes, requirements and progress reports throughout the company as effectively as we should. I propose developing one consistent memo format, recognizable by all staff as the official means of communicating company directives.<br /> While I know this seems like a simple solution, I believe it will cut down on needless e-mail, improve universal communication and allow the staff to save necessary information for later referral.<br /> Please talk among yourselves to determine the proper points of memo writing and return the input to me by 12 noon. I will then send out a notice to the entire staff regarding the new memo format.<br /> Thank you for your prompt attention to this.<br />

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