Riga, September 29, 2011 Tiiu Müürsepp Tartu Consumer Advice and Information Center, Estonia
Renewable Energy (RE) <ul><li>The Electricity Market Act defines renewable sources as  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>-  water, win...
Why is renewable energy important? <ul><li>The European Union, and Estonia as a member, have prioritised an increase in th...
RE in Estonia <ul><li>The potential for renewable energy in Estonia is strongest  </li></ul><ul><li>in  wind power  and </...
Targets set in the development plan for the Estonian electricity sector,  and actual results: <ul><li>Renewable electricit...
The renewable energy charge <ul><li>The renewable energy charge is a fee through which  consumers finance subsidies for re...
The RE charge <ul><li>The renewable energy charge is paid by all consumers in Estonia in proportion to their consumption o...
Wind power fights climate change <ul><li>The wind is an abundant energy resource.  </li></ul><ul><li>  Wind energy  has be...
Statistics Estoni a  September 13, 2011 <ul><li>Estonian power plants produced nearly 13,000 gigawatt-hours (GWh) electric...
Statistics ..... <ul><li>Implementation of combination power plants fuelled by wood chips influenced growth in the renewab...
Statistics . .. <ul><li>Although the share of hydro and wind electricity was still small in the total power generation, or...
Estonian Wind Energy 2009 <ul><li>Total capacity ~142MW wind energy. Wind energy production 172GWh/year.   </li></ul><ul><...
Estonian Wind Energy 2010 <ul><li>Production of wind energy grew significally  </li></ul><ul><li>276 GWh CO2 emission free...
Windparks in Estonia
The production of wind energy is expeted to rise until  340GWh  in 2011
Coming event in Tallinn <ul><li>Swedish Wind Power Association (Svensk Vindkraftförening, SVIF)  and the  Estonian Wind Po...
One of main topics will be there also <ul><li>small scale wind energy – decentralized generation raising awareness about e...
Wind power is usually associated with large industrial power plants that can reah hundreds of feet’s height <ul><li>* Smal...
Selfbuild small windmill  <ul><li>12 interested people took part in the 4-days small windmill upbuilding cources in July 2...
Aulepa Wind Park development
Aulepa Wind Park  <ul><li>Since summer 2009  13 windmills (13x3MW=39MW) work in Aulepa Wind Park </li></ul><ul><li>Biggest...
Aulepa Wind Park development (2) <ul><li>Winwind 3 MW,  3  x 3 MW  = 9 MW </li></ul><ul><li>Building started in May  2010 ...
Paldiski Windpark, 9  x 2, 5  MW  = 22,5 MW, building started July  201 1
Narva Ashfield Windpark, 17 x 2,3 MW  = 39,1 MW building started in November  2010
Combined heat and power production (CHP) <ul><li>More environment friendly – less carbon dioxide emission </li></ul><ul><l...
CHP <ul><li>Tartu 25MW on  biomass and turf working CHP station started up in January 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>Väo 25MW on b...
Tartu CHP
Visit to Tartu Fortum CHP
CHP  development <ul><li>2011  Werol CHP 4,3 MW (CHP bases on earth gas), produces electricity, heat and cold for the rape...
Combined heat and power stations 1.01.2009
Combined heat and power stations 1.01.2009 <ul><li>Based on natural gas- 9 stations : Kopli, Kristiine in Tallinn, Iru, Ke...
Application plan  of developing scheme <ul><li>Renewable energy: </li></ul><ul><li>17,5% in 2006   25% in 2020 </li></ul><...
RE produce in Estonia by Eesti Energia
 
Biogas <ul><li>Biogas is a gas fuel obtained via anaerobic fermentation , which is comprised of 50-70% methane (CH4), 30-4...
Biogas <ul><li>The heating value of obtained biogas typically falls within the range of 5-7 kWh/m 3 , depending on the  me...
Biogas
A biogas station is comprised of the following equipment <ul><li>1      Waste acceptance, pre-preservation storage contain...
Produce of biogas <ul><li>Biodegradable  waste  is directed  from the mixing tanks  to the  biogas reactor,  where an anae...
Biogas <ul><li>t he produced gas is directed for the most part to the  gas storage tanks  </li></ul><ul><li>and  from ther...
Biogas production release CO2 into the atmosphere <ul><li>Biogas production  process  prevents the release of methane , on...
Biogas operating projects in Estonia <ul><li>1.     Tallinn Water Purification Plant ,  </li></ul><ul><li>- approximately ...
Biogas produce in Estonia <ul><li>Working stations (produce biogas for heat and electricity co-production or for himself) ...
Biogas produce  development : <ul><li>Tartu Waste Water Station </li></ul><ul><li>Kuressaare Waste Water Station </li></ul...
Tartu Waste Water Treatment Plant
Tartu Waste Water Treatment Plant
Biogas as fuel :  Estonia – 0 m3/year Latvia – 0 m3/year Finland– ca 100 000 m3/year Sweden  - ca 30 000 000 m3/ year
Compressed gas vehicles and gas stations in Estonia, Latvia, Finland and Sweden <ul><li>Estonia- ca 50 compressed gas cars...
Tiiu Müürsepp [email_address] [email_address]
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Energy in estonia t.müürsepp 29.09.11

  1. 1. Riga, September 29, 2011 Tiiu Müürsepp Tartu Consumer Advice and Information Center, Estonia
  2. 2. Renewable Energy (RE) <ul><li>The Electricity Market Act defines renewable sources as </li></ul><ul><ul><li>- water, wind, sun, </li></ul></ul><ul><li> - waves, tidal, geothermal, landfill gas, </li></ul><ul><li>- sewage treatment plant gas, </li></ul><ul><li>- biogas and biomass. </li></ul><ul><li>Electricity produced from these sources is classed as renewable energy . </li></ul>
  3. 3. Why is renewable energy important? <ul><li>The European Union, and Estonia as a member, have prioritised an increase in the share of renewable energy in production and consumption for several reasons. </li></ul><ul><li>The most important of these is achieving a reduction in environmental pollution , and policies to cut greenhouse gas emissions are a part of this. </li></ul>
  4. 4. RE in Estonia <ul><li>The potential for renewable energy in Estonia is strongest </li></ul><ul><li>in wind power and </li></ul><ul><li>bioenergy-based combined heat and power generation, </li></ul><ul><li>and also in small-scale hydro-power . </li></ul>
  5. 5. Targets set in the development plan for the Estonian electricity sector, and actual results: <ul><li>Renewable electricity as a minimum share of gross consumption </li></ul><ul><li>Target 2010 Actual 2010 Target 2015 </li></ul><ul><li>________________________________ </li></ul><ul><li>5,1% 9,70% 15% </li></ul>
  6. 6. The renewable energy charge <ul><li>The renewable energy charge is a fee through which consumers finance subsidies for renewable energy. </li></ul><ul><li>The renewable energy charge covers electricity produced from renewable sources or in combined heat and power (CHP) mode and put into the network, and its level is set under the Electricity Market Act </li></ul>
  7. 7. The RE charge <ul><li>The renewable energy charge is paid by all consumers in Estonia in proportion to their consumption of network services </li></ul><ul><li>The renewable energy charge applies from 1January to 31December 2011 is </li></ul><ul><li>0,74 euro cents/ kWh </li></ul>
  8. 8. Wind power fights climate change <ul><li>The wind is an abundant energy resource.  </li></ul><ul><li>  Wind energy has become a real alternative to emission producing fossil fuels and, crucially, can be deployed and begin reducing CO2 emissions immediately. </li></ul><ul><li>Wind power replaces fossil fuels and their sizeable CO2 emissions, and therefore helps combat climate change. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Statistics Estoni a September 13, 2011 <ul><li>Estonian power plants produced nearly 13,000 gigawatt-hours (GWh) electricity in 2010, nearly a half more than the year before </li></ul><ul><li>As more than 90 percent of electricity is produced from oil shale </li></ul><ul><li>Generation of electricity from renewable energy sources nearly doubled compared with 2009. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Statistics ..... <ul><li>Implementation of combination power plants fuelled by wood chips influenced growth in the renewable energy most. </li></ul><ul><li>In 2010 generation of wind energy grew by more than 40 percent compared with the year before. </li></ul><ul><li>Production of hydroelectrical energy has been stable during the last three years. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Statistics . .. <ul><li>Although the share of hydro and wind electricity was still small in the total power generation, or less than 3 percent, development in that sphere was remarkable </li></ul>
  12. 12. Estonian Wind Energy 2009 <ul><li>Total capacity ~142MW wind energy. Wind energy production 172GWh/year. </li></ul><ul><li>New Wind Parks: 39MW Aulepa wind park (Eesti Energia AS), 9MW Vanaküla wind park (Nelja Energia OÜ), 16MW Tooma wind park (Nelja Energia OÜ). </li></ul>
  13. 13. Estonian Wind Energy 2010 <ul><li>Production of wind energy grew significally </li></ul><ul><li>276 GWh CO2 emission free electricity in Estonia </li></ul><ul><li>The significant rise was triggered by new wind parks installed in the second half of 2009 in Aulepa, Vanaküla and Tooma </li></ul><ul><li>As well as in Virtsu during the year 2010: 6,9MW Virtsu III (Nelja Energia OÜ). </li></ul>
  14. 14. Windparks in Estonia
  15. 15. The production of wind energy is expeted to rise until 340GWh in 2011
  16. 16. Coming event in Tallinn <ul><li>Swedish Wind Power Association (Svensk Vindkraftförening, SVIF) and the Estonian Wind Power Association (EWPA) in cooperation are organizing a wind power conference in Tallinn 20-21 October at the hotel Radisson Blu Olümpia. </li></ul><ul><li>With presentations from many local and foreign speakers the conference will cover important and current issues of wind power development around the Baltic Sea </li></ul>
  17. 17. One of main topics will be there also <ul><li>small scale wind energy – decentralized generation raising awareness about energy, envir o nment and climate </li></ul>
  18. 18. Wind power is usually associated with large industrial power plants that can reah hundreds of feet’s height <ul><li>* Small wind power 2 - 20 kW range ( nanotechnology-based wind turbine blades and turbines for small power enterprises ) </li></ul><ul><li>www.energiaekspert.ee/ eng/windpower-0 </li></ul><ul><li>is environmentally friendly and can be installed in the backyard of any house. The turbine is positioned on a tower which is from 20 to 60 feet tall. </li></ul><ul><li>Aerodynamic design makes the turbine run very quietly. </li></ul>
  19. 19. Selfbuild small windmill <ul><li>12 interested people took part in the 4-days small windmill upbuilding cources in July 2011 </li></ul><ul><li>A windmill 1kW maximum power, 3 m diameter was built up and implemented </li></ul>
  20. 20. Aulepa Wind Park development
  21. 21. Aulepa Wind Park <ul><li>Since summer 2009 13 windmills (13x3MW=39MW) work in Aulepa Wind Park </li></ul><ul><li>Biggest windpark in Baltic States </li></ul>
  22. 22. Aulepa Wind Park development (2) <ul><li>Winwind 3 MW, 3 x 3 MW = 9 MW </li></ul><ul><li>Building started in May 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Testing of wind generators (June 2011) </li></ul><ul><li>Summary wind power 16x3 MW = 48 MW in Aulepa Wind Park </li></ul>
  23. 23. Paldiski Windpark, 9 x 2, 5 MW = 22,5 MW, building started July 201 1
  24. 24. Narva Ashfield Windpark, 17 x 2,3 MW = 39,1 MW building started in November 2010
  25. 25. Combined heat and power production (CHP) <ul><li>More environment friendly – less carbon dioxide emission </li></ul><ul><li>Produces energy as heat as well electricity, </li></ul><ul><li>CHP are built near their consumer, this allows electricity losses to be reduced and heat prices to be lowered </li></ul><ul><li>Smaler CHP are built in regions where the combined energy production is economically feasible and can ensure the local power supply with the lowest possible environmental impact </li></ul>
  26. 26. CHP <ul><li>Tartu 25MW on biomass and turf working CHP station started up in January 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>Väo 25MW on biomass and turf working CHP station started up also in January 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>Application: to built the Tallinn CHP station (litter and wood) 2x40MW </li></ul>
  27. 27. Tartu CHP
  28. 28. Visit to Tartu Fortum CHP
  29. 29. CHP development <ul><li>2011 Werol CHP 4,3 MW (CHP bases on earth gas), produces electricity, heat and cold for the rape oil produce) </li></ul><ul><li>2012 Pärnu CHP 22MW </li></ul><ul><li>2012 Ahtme CHP 22MW </li></ul><ul><li>2016 Iru Waste CHP 15 MW </li></ul>
  30. 30. Combined heat and power stations 1.01.2009
  31. 31. Combined heat and power stations 1.01.2009 <ul><li>Based on natural gas- 9 stations : Kopli, Kristiine in Tallinn, Iru, Kehra, Vinni, Kunda, Põlva, Tartu, Viljandi </li></ul><ul><li>Based on peat and wood chops- 4 stations : Tootsi, Lohkva, Puhja, Väo </li></ul><ul><li>Based on oilshale or shale based fuels- 5 stations: Narva, Ahtme, Sillamäe, Kohtla-Järve, Kiviõli </li></ul><ul><li>Based on biogas -1station in Pääsküla </li></ul>
  32. 32. Application plan of developing scheme <ul><li>Renewable energy: </li></ul><ul><li>17,5% in 2006 25% in 2020 </li></ul><ul><li>CHP in electricity brutoconsum </li></ul><ul><li>10,2% in 2007 20% in 2020 </li></ul><ul><li>Fuels on base renewable energy sources: </li></ul><ul><li>0,06% in 2007 10% in 2020 </li></ul><ul><li>Source: www.mkm.ee </li></ul>
  33. 33. RE produce in Estonia by Eesti Energia
  34. 35. Biogas <ul><li>Biogas is a gas fuel obtained via anaerobic fermentation , which is comprised of 50-70% methane (CH4), 30-40% carbon dioxide (CO2) and other components such as N2, O2, NH4, H2S. </li></ul><ul><li>It is possible to obtain biogas through the course of natural processes from marshes, bogs and landfills and special ferment i using manure, waste water, woody biomass and other biodegradable waste. </li></ul>
  35. 36. Biogas <ul><li>The heating value of obtained biogas typically falls within the range of 5-7 kWh/m 3 , depending on the methane content of the given biogas, </li></ul><ul><li>which in turn depends on the nutrient content of the fermented material, humidity and type of waste. </li></ul>
  36. 37. Biogas
  37. 38. A biogas station is comprised of the following equipment <ul><li>1      Waste acceptance, pre-preservation storage containers and mixing containers. </li></ul><ul><li>2      Biogas reactors </li></ul><ul><li>3      Fermenting waste storage area </li></ul><ul><li>4      Gas storage units </li></ul><ul><li>5      Heating and power station for the use of gas, boiler or liquification equipment. </li></ul>
  38. 39. Produce of biogas <ul><li>Biodegradable waste is directed from the mixing tanks to the biogas reactor, where an anaerobic process takes place with the temperature in the range of 35 -42 o C. </li></ul><ul><li>During the process, biogas is produced from organic substances in an oxygen poor environment </li></ul>
  39. 40. Biogas <ul><li>t he produced gas is directed for the most part to the gas storage tanks </li></ul><ul><li>and from there to the heat and power station where the energy in the biogas is transformed into heat and electricity . </li></ul><ul><li>The material coming from the biogas reactor is directed towards the fermenting waste storage tanks and is used in the fertili z ation of fields. </li></ul>
  40. 41. Biogas production release CO2 into the atmosphere <ul><li>Biogas production process prevents the release of methane , one of the harmful greenhouse gasses, into the atmosphere, </li></ul><ul><li>the burning of which results in the release of CO2, which has 21 times less global warming potential than methane. </li></ul>
  41. 42. Biogas operating projects in Estonia <ul><li>1.    Tallinn Water Purification Plant , </li></ul><ul><li>- approximately 2.8 million m 3 of biogas /year used in the operation of compressors and production of heat. </li></ul><ul><li>2.    Jööri B iogas S tation , the newest biogas station in Estonia , since 2005 </li></ul><ul><li>- yearly biogas production is 2,4 million m 3 . Raw material - slurry from Saaremaa’s 8 pig farms and sediment from the Kuressaare Water Treatment Plant </li></ul>
  42. 43. Biogas produce in Estonia <ul><li>Working stations (produce biogas for heat and electricity co-production or for himself) : </li></ul><ul><li>1. Jööri Farm, 2005, produces ca 2,4 Mln m 3 /year </li></ul><ul><li>2. Narva Waste Water station </li></ul><ul><li>3. Tallinn Waste Water station, 2,8 Mln m 3 /year </li></ul><ul><li>4. Paljassaare Water Waste station </li></ul><ul><li>5. Salutaguse Yeast Factory </li></ul><ul><li>6. Jõelähtme Waste Station, February 2010, 1,9 MW </li></ul>
  43. 44. Biogas produce development : <ul><li>Tartu Waste Water Station </li></ul><ul><li>Kuressaare Waste Water Station </li></ul><ul><li>Aravete Farms, ca 1,4-1,6 MW, 2011/2012 </li></ul><ul><li>Aardlapalu Waste Station </li></ul><ul><li>Pääsküla Waste Station ,1-2 MW , 2011/2012 </li></ul><ul><li>Tartu Biogas (Ilmatsalu) , 1,2-1,4 MW, 2011/2012 </li></ul><ul><li>Väätsa Waste Station, 0,25 – 0,35 MW, 2012 </li></ul>
  44. 45. Tartu Waste Water Treatment Plant
  45. 46. Tartu Waste Water Treatment Plant
  46. 47. Biogas as fuel : Estonia – 0 m3/year Latvia – 0 m3/year Finland– ca 100 000 m3/year Sweden - ca 30 000 000 m3/ year
  47. 48. Compressed gas vehicles and gas stations in Estonia, Latvia, Finland and Sweden <ul><li>Estonia- ca 50 compressed gas cars and busses </li></ul><ul><li>(10 in Tartu, others in Tallinn), 2 gas stations </li></ul><ul><li>Latvia – ca 10 vehicles (1 bus in Riga) and 1 privat gas station </li></ul><ul><li>Finland - ca 800 vechicles ja 17 gas stations </li></ul><ul><li>Sweden – ca 35 000 vechicles ja 160 stations </li></ul>
  48. 49. Tiiu Müürsepp [email_address] [email_address]

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