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  • It is perhaps a bit ambitious to say that I will cover the “fundamentals” of accreditation since I doubt if we can get many people to agree on what those fundamentals are. What I really want to do is to present some terminology and establish some parameters by which accreditation systems may be described.
  • Before I start on the accreditation presentation, I want to spend a few minutes telling you about IEEE. Some of you are not members and I thought you should know a little more about your host.
  • Discuss each of the interested parties in some detail as to why they are interested and how they are affected by accreditation But mostly, it is of value to society because the fundamental goal of accreditation is
  • Accreditation can serve many purposes and not all of those purposes are as meritorious as others. Everyone can agree that a “good” goal of accreditation is to make sure that students are well educated. Some people, however, have had other goals for accreditation.
  • In the US, engineering accreditation is ostensibly voluntary In New York State, it is required. In the US, in reality, it is coerced since no one dare be without it. An unaccredited program is ineligible for a number of government programs and other benefits. Graduates are at a disadvantage in entering graduate schools. Many companies will not hire graduates of an unaccredited program. Some states require an accredited engineering degree for registration.
  • In writing criteria, one of the most important questions is how specific to make them.
  • Criteria for each of these may be written at any level of specificity. Both extremes have their champions. In general, a compromise will prevail

S1 feisel fundamentalsof-accred S1 feisel fundamentalsof-accred Presentation Transcript

  • The “Fundamentals” of Accreditation Quality Assurance in Educational Programs Lyle D. Feisel Chair, IEEE Com. on Global Accreditation Activities Dean Emeritus of Engineering, SUNY Binghamton ENGINEERING ACCREDITATION AROUND THE WORLD Lima, Peru 3 – 5 December, 2005
  • Outline
    • IEEE, EAB, APC, and CGAA
    • What is accreditation
    • The goals of accreditation
    • Forms of accreditation agencies
    • Some general characteristics
    • Factors that may be considered
    • The big question
    • International considerations
    • Summary
  • The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
    • Formed in 1963 from two predecessor organizations
    • About 350,000 members
    • US in origin, now global in scope
    • About 1/3 of members are non-US
  • From the IEEE Constitution
    • Sec. 2. Its purposes are:
    • (a) scientific and educational, directed toward the advancement of the theory and practice of electrical engineering, electronics, radio and the allied branches of engineering and the related arts and sciences ...
    • … (b) professional, directed toward the advancement of the standing of the members of the professions it serves
  • Structure of IEEE IEEE Board of Directors Technical Activities Board Regional Activities Board Educational Activities Board Publications Services & Products Board IEEE Standards Association
  • Structure of IEEE IEEE Board of Directors Technical Activities Board Regional Activities Board Educational Activities Board Publications Services & Products Board IEEE Standards Association
  • Structure of EAB IEEE Educational Activities Board Awards & Recognition Continuing Professional Education Pre-college Education Public Awareness Accreditation Policy Council
  • Structure of EAB IEEE Educational Activities Board Awards & Recognition Continuing Professional Education Pre-college Education Public Awareness Accreditation Policy Council
  • Structure of APC EAB Accreditation Policy Council Engineering Accreditation Activities (US) Technology accreditation Activities (US) Global Accreditation Activities Computer Accreditation Liaison (US)
  • Structure of APC EAB Accreditation Policy Council Engineering Accreditation Activities (US) Technology accreditation Activities (US) Global Accreditation Activities Computer Accreditation Liaison (US)
  • Mission of CGAA The Committee on Global Accreditation Activities coordinates IEEE activities related to education program accreditation in Regions 8, 9, and 10. The Committee is responsible for planning, developing and conducting activities to advance the IEEE-related professions through accreditation of educational programs in those regions.
  • The “Fundamentals” of Accreditation
  • First, what IS accreditation?
    • External recognition of quality
    • Varies from country to country
    • Of value to:
    • Prospective students
    • Graduates
    • Prospective employers
    • Graduate schools
    • Licensing agencies
    • Governments
  • The Goal of Program Accreditation
    • To assure that graduates are qualified to practice engineering
  • Some Unfortunate Misuses of Accreditation
    • To control the universities
    • To serve the faculty
    • To limit enrollments
    • To control competition
  • “ Accreditation” is sometimes called…
    • Certification
    • Registration
    • Approval
    • Or …..?
  • Accreditation can be…
    • Voluntary
    • Required
    • Coerced
  • Characteristics of Accreditation
    • External Agency
    • Standards (criteria)
    • Evaluation
    • Recognition
    • Maintenance
    • Generally Go or No Go
    • Generally within borders
  • Kinds of Accreditation Agencies
    • Government
    • Peer (other colleges)
    • Professional
    • A combination
    • Private agency
  • Factors that may be considered
    • Curriculum
    • Faculty
    • Students
    • Facilities
    • Administration
    • External constituencies
    • Success of graduates
    • Faculty salaries
    • Staff support
    • Faculty workload
    • Demand for graduates
    • Quality improvement
    • Meets objectives
  • An Important Question
    • Level of specificity
    • What level of detail should be included in the accreditation criteria?
  • Levels of Curricular Specificity
    • Educational goal
    • Abilities of graduates
    • Overall curriculum
    • Courses
    • Course content
    An Example
  • Levels of Curricular Specificity
    • Educational goal Very general
    • Abilities of graduates
    • Overall curriculum
    • Courses
    • Course content Very specific
    An Example
  • Levels of Curricular Specificity
    • Educational goal
    • Abilities of graduates
    • Overall curriculum
    • Courses
    • Course content
  • Specified Educational Goal
    • The program must provide an educational experience that prepares its graduates to enter the practice of engineering
    An Example
  • Levels of Curricular Specificity
    • Educational goal
    • Abilities of graduates
    • Overall curriculum
    • Courses
    • Course content
  • Specified Abilities of Graduates
    • At the completion of the educational program, the graduate must be able to:
      • Define and solve engineering problems
      • Analyze the effects of their solutions on the environment and society
      • Use computers and other modern tools
      • Defend the practices of the government
      • Etc., etc., etc.
    An Example
  • Levels of Curricular Specificity
    • Educational goal
    • Abilities of graduates
    • Overall curriculum
    • Courses
    • Course content
  • Specified Overall Curriculum
    • The program must provide instruction in the following areas:
      • One semester - mathematics
      • One semester – basic science
      • Two semesters – engineering science
      • One semester – engineering design
      • One semester – humanities and social sciences
      • One semester – industrial experience
      • One semester – religion
    An Example
  • Levels of Curricular Specificity
    • Educational goal
    • Abilities of graduates
    • Overall curriculum
    • Courses
    • Course content
  • Specified Courses
    • The mathematics portion of the curriculum must include the following:
      • One course in analytic geometry
      • Two courses in calculus
      • One course in vector calculus
      • One course in ordinary differential equations
      • One course in partial differential equations
      • One course in probability and statistics
    An Example
  • Levels of Curricular Specificity
    • Educational goal
    • Abilities of graduates
    • Overall curriculum
    • Courses
    • Course content
  • Specified Course Content
    • The first course in electric circuits shall cover the following topics:
      • 2 lectures – Ohm’s Law
      • 1 lecture – matrix mathematics
      • 3 lectures – loop equations
      • 3 lectures – node equations
      • Etc., etc., etc.
    An Example
  • Factors that may be considered
    • Curriculum
    • Faculty
    • Students
    • Facilities
    • Administration
    • External constituencies
    • Success of graduates
    • Faculty salaries
    • Staff support
    • Faculty workload
    • Demand for graduates
    • Quality improvement
    • Meets objectives
  • The Big Question
    • If a program is judged to be doing well in all or most of these factors,
    • therefore
    • we may conclude that its graduates are qualified to practice engineering.
    • Is this true?
  • International Considerations
    • Global community has led to increased mobility of engineers and students
    • How can credentials and quality of education be assessed and certified?
  • Different Approaches to International Recognition
    • Accredit programs in other countries
      • IEE (NOT IEEE) yes, ABET no
    • Certify “Substantial Equivalency”
      • ABET yes, others ???
    • Agree to mutual recognition
      • Washington Accord
      • Western Hemisphere Initiative
      • EUR-ACE
    • *Provisional status
    • Australia re-elected chair
    • United States re-elected secretariat
    Washington Accord Signatory Countries (2003-2005) Copyright © 2005 by ABET, Inc. SOUTH AFRICA JAPAN SINGAPORE* MALAYSIA* GERMANY* CHINESE TAIPEI* KOREA* AUSTRALIA CANADA IRELAND NEW ZEALAND UNITED KINGDOM UNITED STATES HONG KONG
    • Verification required at regular intervals (no more than 6 years)
    • Bilateral agreements by individual signatories not Recognized by other signatories
    • Only addresses program accreditation or recognition, not licensure or registration
    • Signatories may exchange observers to annual meetings or accreditation visits
    The Washington Accord Copyright © 2005 by ABET, Inc.
    • Ultimate goal is Mutual Recognition Agreements among engineering education quality assurance organizations in the Western Hemisphere.
    • Initial members include ABET, CHEA, CCPE, and CACEI.
    Western Hemisphere Initiative Copyright © 2005 by ABET, Inc.
  • Summary
    • Voluntary, required or coerced
    • Government, peer, professional or combination
    • Criteria - general to specific
    • May serve
      • Government
      • University
      • Faculty
      • Students
      • Profession
    • International considerations
  • The “Fundamentals” of Accreditation Quality Assurance in Educational Programs Lyle D. Feisel Chair, IEEE Com. on Global Accreditation Activities ENGINEERING ACCREDITATION AROUND THE WORLD Lima, Peru 3 – 5 December, 2005 [email_address]