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Capitalism in Ireland - Working on Alternatives

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Slides from a discussion on research into capitalism in Ireland and alternaitves

Slides from a discussion on research into capitalism in Ireland and alternaitves

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  • * Yet 6 out of 10 Traveller children live in a family where their mothers have no formal education or some primary education only.
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    • 1. 1. Developing alternativemodels of economicanalysis and organisation2. Actively engage in publicdebates and discussions(including on the media)related to their research3. Participate incollaborative researchprojects4. Give some public lectures5. Contribute to theorganization of lecturesor workshops withestablished scholars in thefield
    • 2. 1. Societies are relational.
    • 3. 1. Societies are relational.2. The endless accumulation ofcapital is inherently destructivein terms of humanity and theenvironment.
    • 4. 1. Societies are relational.2. The endless accumulation ofcapital is inherently destructivein terms of humanity and theenvironment.3. The capitalist mode of production is apatriarchal mode of production –„economic man‟ saturates its conceptualframework.
    • 5. Two aspects of modern globalisation:1. Concentration of capital in fewerhands and the domination of TNCs2. The growing role of finance capitalVisible transfers, that is, the trade ingoods, have lost their importance vis-á-vis invisible transfers like bankingtransport, insurances, tourism.Finance transactions play the mostimportant role in this shift.
    • 6. … right from its beginnings the capitalisteconomy has been a world system, basedon colonialism and the marginalisationand exploitation of peripheral countriesand agriculture. This c0lonial structurewas and is the basis for what becameknown as “free trade” in the eighteenthand nineteenth centuriesDue to its inner logic of permanentgrowth or accumulation, capitalism hasto strive towards universality andglobalism.
    • 7. Colonies were not only necessary to initiate theprocess of capital accumulation in what has beencalled the period of „primitive accumulation‟ at thebeginning of capitalism. They continue to benecessary even today to keep the growth mechanismgoing.Therefore we talk of the need for „on-going primitiveaccumulation and colonization‟.The ever-expanding process of capital accumulation isbased on the maintenance or even re-creation ofpatriarchal or sexist man-woman relations, anasymmetric sexual division of labour within andoutside the family…This sexual division of labour is integrated with aninternational division of labour in which women aremanipulated both as „producer-housewives‟ and as„consumer-housewives.‟
    • 8. Closing down of Dissent - Attacks on Equality in IrelandEquality Bodies – closed down or with reduced Budgets Combat Poverty Agency –closed 2008 incorporated into the Department of Social Protection Equality Authority – 2009 43% cut and now being merged with the Human Rights Commission Women’s Health Council – closed 2009 Crisis Pregnancy Agency – closed and merged with the Health Service Executive Irish Human Rights Commission -Budget cuts since 2009 and merged with Equality Authority Equality for Women Measure - co-funded by EU Operational Programme ---budget partly transferred outof this area and now under Dept. For Enterprise, Trade and Employment National Consultative Committee on Racism and Interculturalism (NCCRI) _Closed 2009 Gender Equality desk at the Department (Ministry) of Justice, Equality and Law Reform – Desk Closed2009 Gender Equality Unit – Department of Education – Closed early 2000s Higher Education Equality Unit – UCC -Closed and merged into Higher Education Authority (early 2000s) National Women’s Council of Ireland -158 member organisations- budget cuts of 15% in 2008-11 and38% in 2012 Traveller Education cutbacks 2011 and 2012 – all 42 Visiting teaches for Travellers removed* Rape Crisis Network Ireland – core Health Authority Funding removed 2011 SAFE Ireland network of Women’s’ Refuges - core Health Authority Funding removed 2011 People With Disabilities in Irelands (PWDI) - funding removed 2012 National Carers’ Strategy – abandoned 2009Kathleen Lynch, Equality Studies UCDSchool of Social Justice 23
    • 9. Over the past thirty years, despitetheir being essential to humanlife, neoliberal restructuring acrossthe world has privatised, eroded anddemolished our sharedresources, and ushered in a ‘crisis ofsocial reproduction.’‘Cuts are a Feminist Issue’, Soundings(Dec 2011), p.73.
    • 10. The term social reproduction encompassesall the means by which society reproducesits families, citizens and workers. It includesall the labour that is necessary for a societyto reproduce itself: the biologicalproduction of people and workers, and allthe social practices that sustain thepopulation – bearing children, raisingchildren, performing emotionalwork, providing clothing and food, andcooking and cleaning.
    • 11. The term social reproduction encompassesall the means by which society reproducesits families, citizens and workers. It includesall the labour that is necessary for a societyto reproduce itself: the biologicalproduction of people and workers, and allthe social practices that sustain thepopulation – bearing children, raisingchildren, performing emotionalwork, providing clothing and food, andcooking and cleaning.As a concept social reproduction has beenkey to feminist social theory, because itchallenges the usual distinctions that aremade between productive andreproductive labour, or between the labourmarket and the home.
    • 12. The term social reproduction encompassesall the means by which society reproducesits families, citizens and workers. It includesall the labour that is necessary for a societyto reproduce itself: the biologicalproduction of people and workers, and allthe social practices that sustain thepopulation – bearing children, raisingchildren, performing emotional work,providing clothing and food, and cookingand cleaning.As a concept social reproduction has beenkey to feminist social theory, because itchallenges the usual distinctions that aremade between productive andreproductive labour, or between the labourmarket and the home.Labour in this sphere is often devaluedand privatised, and is typicallyperformed by women in their ‘doubleday’ or ‘second shift’, alongside paidwage labour. But reproductive labourof this kind is just as central tocapitalist accumulation as are otherforms of labour, which means thatstruggles over its structure anddistribution are fundamental to anyunderstanding of issues of power andthe relationships between labour andcapital, as well as the potential fortheir transformation.http://www.newleftproject.org/index.php/site/article_comments/cuts_are_a_feminist_issue
    • 13. Social ReproductionRenewing life is a form of work, a kind of production, asfundamental to the perpetuation of society as the production ofthings.Moreover, the social organization of that work, the set of socialrelationships through which people act to get it done, has variedwidely and that variation has been central to the organization ofgender relations and gender inequality.From this point of view, societal reproduction includes not only theorganization of production but the organization of socialreproduction, and the perpetuation of gender as well as classrelations.Barbara Laslett and Johanna Brenner, ’ Gender and Social Reproduction: HistoricalPerspectives,’ Annual Review of Sociology, Vol. 15 (1989): 383
    • 14. The difference between a subsistenceorientation and scientific omnipotencemania is the understanding that lifeneither simply regenerates itself, nor isit an invention of engineers; ratherwe, as natural beings, have to cooperatewith nature if we want life to continue.(26)
    • 15. 11 May 2010Dear Chief Secretary,Im afraid to tell you theres no money left.Sincerely,Liam Byrne.chief secretary to the Treasury.
    • 16. “The British Government hasrun out of money because all themoney was spent in the goodyears.”George Osborne, 25 February2012
    • 17. “So we cannot just carry on as we are. Unless we reform oureconomy - rebalance demand, restructure banking, and restore thesustainability of our public finances - we shall not only jeopardiserecovery, but also fail the next generation.”Mervyn King,TUC Conference, 15 September 2010.
    • 18. 5 March 2009. QE : £75billion10 October 2011. QE : £75billion2009 – 2011. corporate bondpurchase via asset purchasefacility : £375 billion2012: Monetary PolicyCommittee approve a further£50 billion.“So we cannot just carry on as we are. Unless we reform oureconomy - rebalance demand, restructure banking, and restore thesustainability of our public finances - we shall not only jeopardiserecovery, but also fail the next generation.”Mervyn King,TUC Conference, 15 September 2010.
    • 19. Long Term Refinancing Operations(LTRO)21 December 2011: €489.2 billion to523 banks – 3yrs @ 1 per cent29 February 2012: €529.5 billion to800 banks – 3yrs @ 1 per cent
    • 20. Long Term Refinancing Operations(LTRO)21 December 2011: €489.2 billion to523 banks – 3yrs @ 1 per cent29 February 2012: €529.5 billion to800 banks – 3yrs @ 1 per cent“Some banks, particularly in Spain and Italy, usedportions of those funds to buy higher-yielding bondsissued by their governments at a time when mostinvestors remained skittish, and it helped reducegovernment borrowing costs.But many banks primarily used the funds to pay downmaturing debts or simply deposited the money at otherbanks or with the ECB itself, even though they yield less.The infusion fell short of some politicians hope that itwould stimulate bank lending to customers in strugglingEuropean economies.”Wall Street Journal, 1 March 2012
    • 21. The Desjardins group first managed to democratize and decentralize financialservices, making them accessible to all strata of the population and spreading themacross the Québec local communities.The [Desjardin group] system has always managed to strike a fine balancebetween financial constraints and social concerns, and between the members‟ long-term financial security and their short-term aspirations.The Desjardins experience suggests that its democratic procedures are partly a costindeed, but for an irreplaceable social function…… successive [economic] crises… instead of threatening the existence of thegroup, have in fact reinforced it and provided it with the opportunity to carry outinstitutional innovation and improve its core mission of servicing its members.… rationalist and ethics do make a difference, provided they are allowed to findtheir way in the organization through the institutionalization of routines, checksand balances, and strategic priorities.