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  • Many students come to Careers Service at the ‘getting there’ or application stage, without having spent any time finding out about themselves (what’s important to them, interests them, suits them and what they like doing) and what types of careers will really make them happy. Research has shown that individuals who follow a similar process to this, tend to make more successful career decisions. The main focus of the Careers Service to help you work through this process. This forms the basis of our various careers workshops including our award-winning ‘One-day Workshop’.
  • You have permission to use this PPT presentation in its entirety, without modifications. If you want to modify this presentation, please contact Carol McClelland, PhD with ample time before your presentation to discuss your desired modifications. Please use our Contact Us page at www.greencareercentral.com/contactus For more information about green careers and the green economy, explore these resources: Founder & Executive Director – www.GreenCareerCentral.com Green Economy Map – www.GreenCareerCentral.com/map Green Careers For Dummies – www.GreenCareersForDummies.com Membership Options for Career Development Professionals and site license options for career centers – www.GreenCareerCentral.com/counselors For information about Carol ’ s other books, visit www.amazon.com and use the keyword search for: Dream Careers For Dummies (2005, Wiley) The Seasons of Change (1998, Conari Press)
  • The first obvious question is what is the green economy? There are a lot of terms floating around that people are just using without necessarily knowing what they mean, so I’ve created some real simple terminology slides here just so we can all get on the same page. Generally speaking, the “green economy” refers to economic activity that improves the environment in some way. Often, I think people get the impression that the green economy is off over somewhere else and the traditional economy is here in front of us, and we’re trying to move over to this “someplace else”. I use this slide to show that really the green economy is a new perspective or new overlay over our traditional economy. In the pie chart on the slide, the big circle is the regular economy, and then all of these mismatched pie pieces in the middle are showing us that the green economy is flowing into various industries and economic sectors at a different rate. Some of the industries are ahead of others, so it’s this kind of mismatched feeling right now. Over time, the hope of those of us who believe that this is a critical part of our survival is that this green overlay will continue and spread throughout all of these industries, all the way out to the edge. Now, I don’t know if we’ll ever get that far, but certainly we will continue to see this overlay spread as more and more companies and industries take on this effort to improve the environment.
  • (Remember, with the What You Need to Know about Green Careers, you have access to a pdf version of this image that you can use in your work with clients and students.) For a clickable version of the Green Economy Map, visit www.greencareercentral.com/map (Available January 15, 2010). Script: The first thing I want to do is define where the direct jobs are and where the indirect jobs are. The direct jobs are from 9 o’clock with environmental science, all the way around to 6 o’clock. For those of you who can’t see the slide, think of the face of a clock. That’s 3/4ths of this green economy map that is mostly – not completely, but mostly – jobs that have a direct impact on the state of the planet. The indirect jobs are primarily between 6 o’clock and 9 o’clock, or about a quarter of the jobs in these industries that I’ve got listed here. Also, there are going to be jobs that evolve as these industries grow and mature, and I’ll talk about that in another minute. Overview of the Green Economy Map Let me go through the different quadrants and explain briefly what we’re talking about in the outer two circles here, and later in the presentation I have some slides about the inside. The numbers in the center of the pie are the chapters of the Green Careers For Dummies book that talk about that particular industry or sector, so you’ll be able to cross-reference from the book to this chart. This chart is not in Green Careers For Dummies ; it’s something that evolved after I had written the book. On the top rim, we’ve got Environmental Science , and half of Natural Resources is really related to nature. Then we have all the rest of that top half, from Smart Grid , Informational Technology , Buildings and Transportation – those are all infrastructure. There’s the power infrastructure (smart grid), there’s the informational technology (IT), and then there’s the built environment, which is the manmade environment of buildings and transportation. That whole section up above is really the environment we live and work in – both the natural environment and then all the way over to the manmade environment. One of the two cusp industries or sectors that has a bit to do with nature and also with our infrastructure is Natural Resource Management (think of a water treatment plant or land usage). Those are critical for the built environment, but they also handle the raw materials from nature. Then there’s the Smart Grid . Although we’ll see later that there are some very technical sides to the smart grid, there is also the generation of renewable energy. All renewable energy sources are resources from nature. That’s why that power is closer to the natural environment than, say, Transportation is. Now, from 3 o’clock to 6 o’clock, we’ve got Manufacturing Cycle , and that’s actually a cycle. You’ll see there are no distinct color bars there – it’s all sort of merged together because it is a cycle – it’s not a linear process anymore. They’re finding that one key to greening the manufacturing cycle is to realize that waste when somebody throws away the product that they’ve purchased or the stuff that comes out of the manufacturing plant that’s not the product but everything else left over –is now being seen as an input and becoming a raw material again for another cycle through the manufacturing process. That cycle is critical. There are parts of that cycle that are very trade oriented or technically oriented, and there are also some jobs in there that are more in logistics and planning and the supply chain. So there’s a lot in the cycle for manufacturing. Of course, what you’re manufacturing in that piece are tangible products – things you can touch. In the last quadrant, from 6 o’clock to 9 o’clock, are all the things that are intangible. Here, we’re creating demand to build up this new way of doing business. In the first group, Shaping the Economy , are basically the jobs that have to do with building the policies and regulations that give structure to the green economy. Then there are the people who are working to educate, inspire, motivate, and persuade people that this is the right way to go. This can be anything from environmental educators to marketing to the media… There are a lot of different ways to apply that goal. Then there’s the last one, Services and Experiences . There are services all through the direct kinds of jobs from 9 o’clock to 6 o’clock, but in this particular area, these services are more those that are provided directly to consumers. It could be an eco-hotel or eco-travel or organic restaurant or organic cleaning service. These are people who take the green products that are being produced and then provide that to their customers as a service or experience. In the middle, there’s one piece I haven’t talked about yet, and that’s Engineering, Planning, and Designing . Those three functions I saw repeating over and over and over again. At first, I was trying to put them with one individual industry, and then I realized, no, they’re part of a core hub. They are really part of what’s forming this green economy, and they can work anywhere, from natural resources management all the way through manufacturing. They may have slightly different job titles, but their basic function remains the same.
  • The term green is also associated with jobs, so same definition. “ Green jobs” are those that improve the environment in some way, and some jobs will have a direct impact on the environment. By that, I mean they will be able to see direct results from their actions, whether they’re using less fossil fuels and creating less greenhouse gases, or they’re handling waste appropriately so there’s not as much waste to landfill, but these jobs have a direct visible or measurable impact on the environment. These are the jobs you typically hear the media talking about. The jobs that many of you are interested in are the jobs that have an indirect impact. These are the jobs that are probably going to be most applicable to people who have a liberal arts background or a management background. The individuals in jobs that have an indirect impact on the planet are forming policy and encouraging people through marketing, sales, and education to take different actions. These jobs are critical because they are the jobs that are creating demand for this new way of thinking and new way of doing business. So to give you that assurance right up front, there are positions, and those positions will actually be growing in number as the economy develops.
  • You may know this, but I always like to bring it up. Jobs can be found in all of these different environments : start-ups, private companies, large cap, all levels of government, non-profits, educational institutions, the NGOs. There are opportunities for green jobs. They’re not just in start-ups, as some might imagine if you’re just paying attention to, for instance, renewable energy. We need these people with these sustainability skills throughout.
  • Need to direct biodegradable waste from landfill, in order to meet the first Landfill Directive target due in July 2010. Regional Waste Management Plans outline the infrastructure that should be put in place to meet the needs of a growing population and economy Using the Economic and Social Research Institute's (ESRI) Sustainable Development Model for Ireland (ISus) to forecast national environmental emissions and resource use up to 2030, it is estimated that the total volume of municipal waste is likely to increase quite substantially within the coming decade, necessitating future investment in waste management infrastructure
  • First, I want to let you know that when I say “green”, I’m really talking about the big picture of “green”: green, clean, and sustainable jobs. I’m talking about direct jobs (those that have a direct impact on the planet) and those that have an indirect impact on the plant.
  • (Remember, with the What You Need to Know about Green Careers, you have access to a pdf version of this image that you can use in your work with clients and students.) For a clickable version of the Green Economy Map, visit www.greencareercentral.com/map (Available January 15, 2010). Script: The first thing I want to do is define where the direct jobs are and where the indirect jobs are. The direct jobs are from 9 o’clock with environmental science, all the way around to 6 o’clock. For those of you who can’t see the slide, think of the face of a clock. That’s 3/4ths of this green economy map that is mostly – not completely, but mostly – jobs that have a direct impact on the state of the planet. The indirect jobs are primarily between 6 o’clock and 9 o’clock, or about a quarter of the jobs in these industries that I’ve got listed here. Also, there are going to be jobs that evolve as these industries grow and mature, and I’ll talk about that in another minute. Overview of the Green Economy Map Let me go through the different quadrants and explain briefly what we’re talking about in the outer two circles here, and later in the presentation I have some slides about the inside. The numbers in the center of the pie are the chapters of the Green Careers For Dummies book that talk about that particular industry or sector, so you’ll be able to cross-reference from the book to this chart. This chart is not in Green Careers For Dummies ; it’s something that evolved after I had written the book. On the top rim, we’ve got Environmental Science , and half of Natural Resources is really related to nature. Then we have all the rest of that top half, from Smart Grid , Informational Technology , Buildings and Transportation – those are all infrastructure. There’s the power infrastructure (smart grid), there’s the informational technology (IT), and then there’s the built environment, which is the manmade environment of buildings and transportation. That whole section up above is really the environment we live and work in – both the natural environment and then all the way over to the manmade environment. One of the two cusp industries or sectors that has a bit to do with nature and also with our infrastructure is Natural Resource Management (think of a water treatment plant or land usage). Those are critical for the built environment, but they also handle the raw materials from nature. Then there’s the Smart Grid . Although we’ll see later that there are some very technical sides to the smart grid, there is also the generation of renewable energy. All renewable energy sources are resources from nature. That’s why that power is closer to the natural environment than, say, Transportation is. Now, from 3 o’clock to 6 o’clock, we’ve got Manufacturing Cycle , and that’s actually a cycle. You’ll see there are no distinct color bars there – it’s all sort of merged together because it is a cycle – it’s not a linear process anymore. They’re finding that one key to greening the manufacturing cycle is to realize that waste when somebody throws away the product that they’ve purchased or the stuff that comes out of the manufacturing plant that’s not the product but everything else left over –is now being seen as an input and becoming a raw material again for another cycle through the manufacturing process. That cycle is critical. There are parts of that cycle that are very trade oriented or technically oriented, and there are also some jobs in there that are more in logistics and planning and the supply chain. So there’s a lot in the cycle for manufacturing. Of course, what you’re manufacturing in that piece are tangible products – things you can touch. In the last quadrant, from 6 o’clock to 9 o’clock, are all the things that are intangible. Here, we’re creating demand to build up this new way of doing business. In the first group, Shaping the Economy , are basically the jobs that have to do with building the policies and regulations that give structure to the green economy. Then there are the people who are working to educate, inspire, motivate, and persuade people that this is the right way to go. This can be anything from environmental educators to marketing to the media… There are a lot of different ways to apply that goal. Then there’s the last one, Services and Experiences . There are services all through the direct kinds of jobs from 9 o’clock to 6 o’clock, but in this particular area, these services are more those that are provided directly to consumers. It could be an eco-hotel or eco-travel or organic restaurant or organic cleaning service. These are people who take the green products that are being produced and then provide that to their customers as a service or experience. In the middle, there’s one piece I haven’t talked about yet, and that’s Engineering, Planning, and Designing . Those three functions I saw repeating over and over and over again. At first, I was trying to put them with one individual industry, and then I realized, no, they’re part of a core hub. They are really part of what’s forming this green economy, and they can work anywhere, from natural resources management all the way through manufacturing. They may have slightly different job titles, but their basic function remains the same.
  • Now the question is: “Where are the jobs in your area?” This is really a hard question, because it’s not the same in every region. People always ask, “What are the hot industries in St. Louis?” or whatever. The key to understanding this business: What are the natural resources that are in abundance in your area? Different renewable energies have a definite pattern to them, and over time I’ll have those maps available online. However, there are maps that show the potential for wind, and the potential for solar, and the potential for geothermal. Those maps show you whether that’s a good industry for your clients and students to be a part of. Consider historical industries: We’re seeing a lot of manufacturing companies in the Midwest and the Rust Belt transitioning over to green manufacturing – manufacturing green products, maybe wind turbines or energy efficient windows. They had the basic human resources, they had the plants, and they’re repurposing those because they had that history. Silicon Valley in California is really moving toward cleantech. It’s not so much high tech that you hear about anymore. It’s taking the human resource knowledge that we have – the technical skill, the education – and asking “What part of this green movement is really in sync with the people who are here?” and, in this case, it’s clean tech. Different regions of the country are going to experience different things. The other thing that’s going to define the opportunities in your area is how many cities, counties, and entire states have green sustainable initiatives. Certain cities – Chicago, Portland, the Seattle area, Boston, and San Francisco come to mind – because they have highly excited and motivated groups of people who want to move toward as many green opportunities and initiatives as possible. That filters out to the community. Watch what’s happening in your region and that will give you another sign of the things that are going to be taking off. Now, I’ve alluded to this Industry Status piece, but if a company is in R&D, they’re not going to need certain kinds of jobs yet. It’s going to be that waiting game. But an established company is going to need those positions. There are a lot of very large cap companies that are beginning to get into this green world: Google, IBM, Wal-mart… So if you have people you’re working with who want more stability than a start-up company is going to give them, there are now more and more companies that are getting into this movement.
  • Many students come to Careers Service at the ‘getting there’ or application stage, without having spent any time finding out about themselves (what’s important to them, interests them, suits them and what they like doing) and what types of careers will really make them happy. Research has shown that individuals who follow a similar process to this, tend to make more successful career decisions. The main focus of the Careers Service to help you work through this process. This forms the basis of our various careers workshops including our award-winning ‘One-day Workshop’.

Graduate careers ireland Graduate careers ireland Presentation Transcript

  • Born green, think green, live green and die green
    • Green Careers, what next for graduates?
    • Dave Kilmartin, Marie Gonnelly
    • Dublin Institute of Technology
    • Overview
    • Green Economy / Green Job
    • Ireland
    • Overview of sectors
    • Direct and Indirect opportunities
    • Going Forward
    • Q&A
  • Values Interests Personality Skills External influences Know what’s out there Take stock Get there Make a choice Know yourself Employment Further Study Year out Entrepreneurship Job Hunt Application process Organise year out Start business Internship/grad prog Reflection on journey to date Occupational profiles Labour market information Information Interview Work experience Job shadowing
  • ?
  • What Is the Green Economy?  2009 Transition Dynamics Enterprises, Inc. Used with permission. economic activity that improves the environment in some way encompasses the wide range of goods and services that fall within the scope of environmental and natural-resource use, management and protection
  • Green Industries and Sectors (c) 2009 Transition Dynamics Enterprises, Inc. Used with permission  2009 Transition Dynamics Enterprises, Inc. Used with permission.
  • What Are Green Jobs?
    • G reen jobs are those that improve the environment in some way.
    • Some will have a DIRECT impact
    • Others will have an INDIRECT impact
     2009 Transition Dynamics Enterprises, Inc. Used with permission.
  • Green Jobs Can Be Found In:
    • Start ups
    • Private companies
    • Large cap companies
    • All levels of government
    • Non profits
    • Educational institutions
    • NGO – Non-governmental organizations
     2009 Transition Dynamics Enterprises, Inc. Used with permission.
  • United Nations Environment Program
    • ‘ green-collar job is (one) in agricultural, manufacturing, research and development (R&D), administrative, and service activities that contribute(s) substantially to preserving or restoring environmental quality. …………… this includes jobs that help to protect ecosystems and biodiversity; reduce energy, materials, and water consumption through high efficiency strategies; de-carbonize the economy; and minimize or altogether avoid generation of all forms of waste and pollution."
  • What is a ‘green’ job?
    • Difficulty with predicting numbers and growth due to definition of ‘green’ career
    • Industries
    • Manufacturing
    • Finance
    • Design & Engineering, Energy Efficiency
    • Governmental
    • Conservation
    • Non-profits
    • Functional Areas
    • Installation
    • Operations
    • Marketing
    • Sales
    • Engineering
    • Finance / Accounting
    • Project Management
    • Energy Auditing
  • Green job titles
    • Agricultural Inspector Architect (Environmental /Sustainable Design) Bicycle / Scooter Developers and Technicians Biologist (Conservation) Building Operations Management Business Manager Car Manufacturing (Green) Chemist (Environmental) Climate Risk Analyst Climatologist/Environmental Meteorologist Community Affairs Manager Complementary Health and Medical Care
    • Construction (Energy Efficiency - Green Building) CSR Professional Ecologist Economists (Environmental) Educators (Ecological) Emissions Manager Emissions Trader Energy Manager (Renewable) Engineers (Environmental / Pollution Control) Engineers and Developers (Sustainable Energy) Engineer/Biologist (Renewable Fuels/ Bio-Mimicry) Entrepreneur (Green) Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) Technicians
    • Fashion Designer (Green) Financial analyst/adviser specializing in socially responsible investing Food Scientist Forester Fund-Raising Director Furniture Builder (Eco-friendly) Green Travel and Hospitality Heating, air conditioning and refrigeration mechanic and installer Hydrologist / Environmental scientist Industrial Designer (Sustainable) Interface Designers Interior Designer (Green) Wind Energy Developers and Construction Professionals
    • IT Specialists (Green Software and Hardware Developers) Landscape Architect (Green) Lawyer (Environmental) Lobbyist Organic Food and Farming Production Specialists Pollution Control Technician Protection Technician Scientist (Environmental) Solar Installation Sustainability Specialists Toxicologist Urban Gardeners Waste Management
  • Developing the Green Economy in Ireland 2009
    • Existing strength in environmental good and services sector (waste management , waster treatment, recycling, environmental consultancy)
    • 6,500 people in direct green employment (Forfás /InterTrade Ireland (2008)
    • US bulk of current US green employment is in conservation and pollution mitigation, prediction for jobs in environmentally friendly production, clean energy and energy efficiency to grow
    • Ireland has range of sectors developing products, services and processes, and these were identified for export and employment potential
    • Renewable energy
    • Efficient Energy Use and Management
    • Waster Management , Recover and Recycling
    • Water and Waste Treatment
    • “ The environmental goods and services industry consists of activities which produce goods and services to measure, prevent, limit, minimise or correct environmental damage to water, air and soil, as well as problems related to waste, noise and eco systems. This includes cleaner technologies, products and services that reduce environmental risk and minimise pollution and resource use.” (OECD/Eurostat agreed definition)
  • Inevitable change
    • Fossil – renewable sources
    • Greater efficiency, conservation and management
    • Reduce pollution
  • Renewables
    • Products, systems and services for the generation and collection of energy from renewable sources
    • Sources include biomass/ bio fuels, solar, photovoltaic, wind, hydro, tidal and geothermal sources
    • Opportunities in manufacture of equipment and design, construction, installation, management and operation of renewable energy facilities
  • Wind
    • 124 wind farms on-line and operational, in 23 counties on the island of Ireland (Source IWEA)
    • IWEA predict that 16,000 new jobs could be created with the explosion of wind industry investment in the process of delivering on Ireland's 40% electricity from renewable target by 2020
    • Opportunities –
    • electrical and mechanical engineers to oversee the operation of the turbines and the internal electrical systems
    • Wind Resource Analyst/Wind Farm technician/ Turbine Manufacturing
    • Computational analysts (IT /Maths/Physicists) to assess the projected generation output systems
    • Administrative and clerical, PR, community liaison, environmental impact, finance, business
    • Use technology-driven companies to provide more efficient and innovative mechanical and software based components for wind turbine design and manufacture ( ICT graduates )
    • Companies installing, maintaining small scale turbines and providing consultancy engineering services for the design, installation and management of wind farms
  • Marine (Wave and Tidal)
    • Ireland is one of the most favourable locations in the world for wave energy
    • Expertise developing in areas of turbine design, wave tank model testing and wave energy modelling
    • Marine Institute & Sustainable Energy Ireland study in 2005 calculated that 1,900 jobs could be created by 2020 if Ireland continued to invest in marine energy technology
    • Early stages of development
  • Bioenergy (biofuels and biomass)
    • Energy which is derived from renewable organic material otherwise known as biomass
    • Industry is developing rapidly and opportunities exist for companies across the sector
    • Companies process raw biomass material (e.g. municipal/commercial waste, agricultural waste, dedicated energy crops, food crops, wood waste, human/animal waste, wastewater sludge, etc.), and convert into a fuel (e.g. wood pellets, refuse derived fuel, biogas, biodiesel and bioethanol) or energy (heat, power)
    • Opportunities to develop/ supply technologies and equipment used for processing biomass into fuel or energy (e.g. biomass boiler,
    • anaerobic digestion systems, gasification units, etc.)
  • Microrenewables
    • Domestic scale devices which generate energy from renewable sources e.g.
    • Roof-mounted wind turbines
    • Roof mounted solar technologies
    • Ground Source Heat Pumps
    • Biofuels
    • E.g.
    • Domestic biomass burners Solar Water, PV, Micro-wind, Heat Pumps, Fuel cells, Electrolysers, Grid Tie, Inverter Systems, Energy Storage ,Energy control systems
    • Opportunities for graduates with Design and installation experience, planning, project management and construction, and in particular sales and marketing
  • Solar
    • Passive Solar
    • Active Solar Heating
    • Solar Photovoltaic (PV) Systems
    • PV, Solar Thermal, Solar Heating, Solar Cooking, Solar Thermal Electricity, Hybrid solar lighting
    • Opportunities for solar systems/solar panel/test /mechanical design engineers
    • Mechanical/Manufacturing/Electrical /Mechatronics/ engineering and life sciences graduates
    • Sales, Finance, Marketing and PR
  • Efficient energy use and management
    • Energy loss from buildings is one of the largest contributors to overall energy wastage
    • Eco-construction involves using technologies within the fabric of new and existing buildings to minimise energy loss and maximise energy efficiency
    • Retrofitting buildings for energy efficiency forecast investment levels to 2020 in retrofitting buildings to comply with Building Energy Rating (BER) standards in Ireland could be worth up to €25 billion (SEI)
    • Energy Management/Efficiency Services rising energy costs and full roll-out of the BER/EPC system are expected to make this sector an area of potential high growth. Indigenous Energy Service Companies
  • Policy/Legislation
    • Environmental Legislation creation and development, including treaties, regulations, directives, decisions, recommendations and opinions and plans and policies.
    • International, European and National Law
    • Environmental Regulators
    • Civil Law, Criminal Law, Public Law and litigation
    • Statutory Bodies
  • Environmental Consultancy and Services
    • Environmental Assessment
    • Environmental Management Systems (EMS)
    • Life Cycle Assessment (LCA)
    • Environmental auditing
    • Environmental risk management
    • Environmental monitoring
    • Environmental reporting
    • Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR)
    • Eco-footprint/carbon-footprint
    • Eco-labelling/carbon labelling
    • Environmental Decision Making
    • (Public and Private Sector Industries)
  • Waste (management and disposal)
    • Direct biodegradable waste from landfill, in order to meet the first Landfill Directive target due in July 2010.
    • Using the Economic and Social Research Institute's (ESRI) Sustainable Development Model for Ireland (ISus) to forecast national environmental emissions and resource use up to 2030, it is estimated that the total volume of municipal waste is likely to increase quite substantially within the coming decade, necessitating future investment in waste management infrastructure
    • Municipal waste
    • Packaging waste
    • Municipal waste infrastructure
    • Anaerobic Digestion (AD) A number of companies now offer full turnkey solutions for the anaerobic digestion of wastewater sludge
    • Stumbling block is financial return , but analyses can ignore the environmental benefits
    • Developments in alternative AD technologies that generate energy from waste via pyrolysis or produce a secondary energy carrier, potential growth area
    • Combined Heat and Power CHP systems are used to produce electricity and heat simultaneously from a single fuel source
    • Opportunities in designing, building and installing combined heat and power (CHP) systems, and also design biomass boilers and district heating systems
  • Water and Wastewater Treatment
    • Water Services Investment Programme (WSIP) and National Development Plan (NDP) in Ireland, continued funding
    • Growth experienced by indigenous companies as result of investments made by the public sector in water services
    • Value estimated at €622m in 2004 by Ernst and Young
    • Advanced water solutions advanced technologies, such as membrane systems and ultraviolet(UV) treatments, increase demand predicted
    • Leak control, monitoring and supply networks conserve water and prevent groundwater pollution. Opportunities in replacing leaking and failing water supply and wastewater collection networks
    • Replacing and upgrading existing supply/collection networks is one of the key growth areas within the water industry
    • Niches for manufacturers of robust piping products ; services and technologies for the monitoring and detection of leakages along networks.
    • Design-Build-Operate (DBO) of water/wastewater treatment plants
    • Processing wastewater sludge advanced technologies and services
    • Integrated greywater recycling and rainwater harvesting systems Opportunities for systems which can process, capture and store greater quantities of water for reuse
    • Water analysis developing accurate equipment , monitoring contaminants
    • Prefabricated wastewater treatment systems opportunities in efficient cost-effective system which requires a smaller operating area, produces a higher quality effluent and needs less maintenance (cleaning, emptying)
    • Odour control opportunities for providing odour abatement and control solutions
  • Waste Management, Recovery and Recycling
    • Waste-to-energy - will be an important part of Ireland’s waste sector.
    • Waste collection - more efficient collection and transportation
    • Waste transfer and disposal - Design-Build-Operate (DBO) of landfills growth area
    • Trading - strong market demand for recovered materials such as plastics, metal and organics
    • Processing - recycle recovered material into a raw product. opportunities for companies working in the area of recycling different types of plastics
    • Recycling of organic waste - efficient systems for composting/ancillary services
    • Waste processing equipment compactors, shredders, balers and Crushers, new innovative technologies for processing more specific types of waste.
  • Food
    • ‘ By 2030, the planet will need to produce 50% more food, with less land, water and energy while also reducing greenhouse emissions’ United Nations 2008
    • Changes to the Common Agricultural Policy, WTO agreements and climate change - Challenges for Ireland
    • Manufacture of food and drink products is Ireland's most important indigenous industry with an output approaching €20 billion
    • New product developers / food technologists developing green products using sustainable, seasonal, organic ingredients
    • Farmers/ Food producers as suppliers
    • Development of alternate food sources, e.g. GM, synthetic
    •  
    • Food product and labeling and PR
    • Reduced carbon footprint and over farming using only seasonal produce with
    •   less 'air-miles'
    • Quality Control / Assurance Officers in food manufacturing and processing
    • Green restaurants with chefs offering green dishes and recipes
    • Nutritional / Dietary advisers 
    • Educators / Trainers / Academics - delivering info and skills training on 'green' cooking
    •   Food promotion / PR / marketing -  www.goodfoodireland.ie  
    • Food journalism / media delivering on green topics
    • Food and drink consultant / adviser / expert 
    • Postgrad research
    • Sales Rep/Marketing
    • Food/Eco tourism
    • Waste management for food sectors
    • Event management food festivals, events, farmers markets
    • Food safety officer - ensuring the quality of food produce and associated info (labelling etc.). Food Safety Authority of Ireland  (FSAI);Safe Food: Food Safety Authority of Ireland; Organic Trust
    •   Bakery / Pastry using organic ingredients. 
    • Kitchen Gardens - encouraging home grown produce
  • Services
    • Marketing
      • Green Products Marketing/Sales Manager/Market Researcher
    • Research & Development
      • Green Products enterprise/innovation/development
    • Senior Management
      • Sustainability Officers/Consultants
    • Financial Jobs
      • Trade Renewable Energy, & Carbon Credit Trading
      • Venture Capitalists
      • Analyze financial impacts of sustainability issues on bottom line
      • Analyze climate change risks for insurance industry
    • Operations Management
      • Sustainability Coordinator
      • Green Processes Engineering
    • Every job can be green job if you consider sustainability in decision making
  • Other Services
    • Green Design and Marketing
    • Green Food and Drink
    • Green ‘Globetrotting’
    • Green Tourism – eco tourism officers, eco consultant , nature reserve specialist, sustainable tourism marketing officer, ecotour leader, adventure tourism researcher, environmental tourism consultant
    • (source – ecoclub.com May 2010)
  • Direct/Indirect
  • Green Industries and Sectors (c) 2009 Transition Dynamics Enterprises, Inc. Used with permission  2009 Transition Dynamics Enterprises, Inc. Used with permission.
  • Direct
    • Natural Environment - environmental and life sciences, natural resource management , air, water, land, forests, fish and wildlife
    • Power Infrastructure / Smart Grid –
    • Power Generation, Transmission , Distribution , Consumption Mgmt
    • ICT – hardware, data, networks, software
    • Built Environment – green design /construction /retrofitting residential , industrial, commercial , public . Green transportation (rail/air/road), overhaul of infrastructure
    • Manufacturing Cycle – ‘cradle to grave’ , reassessing manufacturing processes, recycling materials, no waste
  • Indirect
      • Law/ Policy/Regulation /Certification
      • Banking, Financial Services and Insurance
      • Public Relations/Media/IT
      • Education / Training
      • Retail / Hospitality
      • Sales / Marketing / Consultancy Services
  • Irish Green Jobs?
    • Potential to create up to 80,000 jobs
    • Develop an innovation-based green enterprise sector
    • Environmental goods and services market $2.8 billion in 2008
    • Green procurement; renewable energy and providing energy efficiency; green enterprise zones; green R&D, waste management and water and waste water treatment.
  • Training and Upskilling
    • New skills requirements will demand new dedicated specialisms
    • Need for Computing, Electronics, Environmental, Electrical and Mechanical engineering disciplines
    • Continue collaboration between industry and academic institutions in relation to course design and content
    • Graduate placement should be encouraged
    • R & D potential of HEI’s should be recognised to design, develop and commercialise environmental goods and services
  • Values Interests Personality Skills Know what’s out there Take stock Get there Make a choice Know yourself Employment Further Study Year out Entrepreneurship Job Hunt Application process Organise year out Start business Internship/grad prog Reflection on journey to date Occupational profiles Labour market information Information Interview Work experience Job shadowing
  • “ A survey of successful job hunters revealed that the most successful job seekers spent time talking to people in various businesses and organisations before they began actively seeking job interviews” Richard Bolles: “What Colour is your Parachute?”
  • Will you? (Attitude & Motivations) Values and Interests Personality Skills Will you fit? (into the company culture and objectives) Can you? (Skills & Abilities)
  • Create your own journey
  • “ To be employed is to be at risk, to be employable is to be secure” Peter Hawkins
  •