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HUSC 3366 Chapter 14 Part I Retirement Planning
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HUSC 3366 Chapter 14 Part I Retirement Planning

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Fundamental of Family Financial Planning Course PowerPoint Lecture

Fundamental of Family Financial Planning Course PowerPoint Lecture

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HUSC 3366 Chapter 14 Part I Retirement Planning HUSC 3366 Chapter 14 Part I Retirement Planning Presentation Transcript

  • RETIREMENT PLANNING Chapter 14 1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
  • LESSON 1: PLANNING FOR RETIREMENT: START EARLY
    • Objective 1:
    • Analyze your current assets and liabilities for retirement and estimate your retirement living costs.
    1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
  • MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT RETIREMENT PLANNING
    • My expenses will decrease when I retire.
    • My retirement will only last 15 years.
    • Social Security & my pension will pay for my basic living expenses.
    • My pension benefits will increase to keep pace with inflation.
    1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
  • MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT RETIREMENT PLANNING
    • My employers health insurance plan and Medicare will cover my medical expenses.
    • There’s plenty of time for me to start saving for retirement.
    • Saving just a little bit won’t help.
    (continued) 1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
  • THE IMPORTANCE OF STARTING EARLY
    • To take advantage of the time value of money.
      • If from age 25 to 65 you invest $300 a month (9%), at age 65 you’ll have a nest egg of $1.4 million.
      • Wait ten years until age 35 to start and you’ll have about $550,000 at age 65.
      • Wait twenty years until age 45 and you’ll have only $201,000 at age 65.
      • See Exhibit 18-11.
    1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
  • WHY THINK ABOUT RETIREMENT PLANNING NOW?
    • People are spending more years (16-25) in retirement.
    • You don’t want to be bored, lonely and broke. Start planning early.
    • A private pension and Social Security are often insufficient to cover the cost of living.
    • Inflation may diminish the purchasing power of your retirement savings.
    1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
  • REVIEW YOUR ASSETS FOR RETIREMENT
    • Housing.
      • If owned, probably your biggest single asset.
      • If large equity, a reverse annuity mortgage could provide additional retirement income.
      • You could sell your home, buy a less expensive one, and invest the difference.
    1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
  • REVIEW YOUR ASSETS FOR RETIREMENT
    • Life insurance cash value can be converted into an annuity.
    • Review investments, such as stocks & bonds. Consider taking the income from them.
    • Retirement assets are affected by divorce.
      • Pension benefits are considered a marital asset to be divided, depending on the length of the marriage.
      • There are tax implications of the divorce settlement.
    (continued) 1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
  • ESTIMATING YOUR RETIREMENT LIVING EXPENSES
    • Spending patterns, where & how you live will probably change.
    • Some expenses may go down or stop, such as 401(k) retirement fund contributions.
      • Work expenses - less for gas, lunches out.
      • Clothing expenses - fewer and more casual.
      • Housing expenses - house payment may stop if your house is paid off, but taxes, insurance may go up.
      • Federal income taxes will probably be lower.
    1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
  • ESTIMATING RETIREMENT LIVING EXPENSES
    • Other expenses may go up.
      • Life and health insurance unless your employer continues to pay them.
      • Medical expenses increase with age.
      • Expenses for leisure activities may go up.
      • Gifts and contributions may increase.
      • See Exhibit 18-5.
    • Inflation will cause your expenses to increase over the course of your probable 16-25 years in retirement.
    1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
  • USE WEBSITES TO HELP YOU ESTIMATE RETIREMENT EXPENSES
    • American Savings Education Council website at www.asec.org and click on savings tools.
    • Roth IRA website www.rothira.com .
    • Go to financial calculator website and then click on calculators and then Retirement.
      • www.moneymag.com
    1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
  • HOW AN “AVERAGE” OLDER (65+) HOUSEHOLD SPENDS ITS MONEY U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics 1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff Insurance and other Entertainment Food Medical Housing Transportation Clothing Contributions 32.5% 11.3% 16.3% 15.4% 4.9% 5.7% 7.7% 6.2%
  • PLANNING YOUR RETIREMENT HOUSING
    • Think about where you want to live.
    • Consider the cost of living, taxes & moving.
    • Type of housing and changing needs.
      • 92% prefer to stay in their own home.
      • A universal designed home is built to allow for potential physical limitations.
      • If not built using universal design, home may need to be retrofitted.
      • Continuing care retirement community provide increasing levels of care.
    1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
  • AVOID RETIREMENT HOUSING TRAPS
    • If you plan to move when you retire…
      • Write the local Chamber of commerce to learn about taxes and the economic profile.
      • Check on state income and sales taxes, and taxes on pension income.
      • Call a local CPA to find our what taxes are rising.
      • Subscribe to a local Sunday paper.
      • Estimate what your utility, health care, auto insurance, food, and clothing costs would be in the area.
      • Rent for awhile instead of buying immediately.
    1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
  • LESSON 2: YOUR RETIREMENT INCOME
    • Objective 2:
    • Determine your planned retirement income and develop a balanced based on your retirement income.
    1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
    • Individual accounts for each employee.
      • Money-purchase pension plans - A percent of your earnings are set aside, along with any employer contributions.
      • Stock bonus plans - Employer’s contribution is used to buy stock in your company for you.
      • Profit-sharing plans - Employer’s contribution depends on the company’s profits.
    Employer Pension Plans Defined Contribution Plan 1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
  • PLANNING YOUR RETIREMENT INCOME
      • Salary reduction or 401(k), 403(b) or 457 plans.
        • Employer makes non-taxable contributions and reduces your salary by the same amount.
        • Employee contributions are tax-deferred.
        • Some employers match a portion of the funds you contribute.
        • See Exhibit 18-9.
        • See Exhibit 18-10 for comparison between defined contribution and defined benefit plans.
    Employer Pension Plans - Defined Contribution (continued) 1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
  • PLANNING YOUR RETIREMENT INCOME
    • Employer will pay you a certain amount per month when you retire based on your pre-retirement salary and number of years of service.
    • Employer makes the investment decisions for your and their contribution, but your benefit amount stays the same regardless of how the investments perform.
    Employer Pension Plans - Defined Benefit (continued) 1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
  • PENSION PLAN PORTABILITY AND VESTING
    • Portability: You can carry earned benefits from one employer’s pension plan to another’s when you change jobs.
    • Vesting is your right to at least a portion of the benefits you have accrued under an employer pension plan, even if you leave before you retire.
    • When you leave a job you can cash in your pension (tax consequences), have the employer keep the funds so you will get a future pension from them, rollover the funds into an IRA, or transfer the funds to invest in a pension with your new employer if your pension is portable.
    1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
  • PUBLIC PENSION PLANS
    • Most widely used source of retirement income, covering almost 97% of U.S. workers.
    • Meant to be part of your retirement income, but not the sole source.
    • Check the Earnings & Benefit statement you receive each year for accuracy.
    • Full retirement benefits at age 65 to age 67, depending on the year you were born, but reduced benefits at age 62.
    • See www.ssa.gov .
    Social Security 1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
  • PLANNING YOUR RETIREMENT INCOME
    • Up to 85% of your benefit may be subject to federal income tax for any year in which your AGI plus your nontaxable interest income & one-half of your Social Security benefits exceed a base amount. Publication 554.
    • Cost of living adjustment each year.
    • Spouse's benefit is one-half of the worker’s benefit.
    Social Security ( continued ) (continued) 1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
  • FUTURE OF SOCIAL SECURITY
    • Many people are concerned about the future of Social Security. Bush plan to overhaul it.
    • Longer life expectancies means retirees collect benefits longer.
    • People are retiring earlier and entering the system sooner and staying longer.
    • The baby boomers will begin retiring soon and the ratio of workers to retirees is doing down.
      • In 1945 there were 42 workers per retiree,
      • In 2005 there are three workers per retiree.
    1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
  • PERSONAL RETIREMENT PLANS
    • Individual Retirement Accounts
    • Regular (traditional) IRA.
      • Lets you contribute up to $4,000 per year (see text chart as these amount are rising).
      • Depending on your tax filing status and income, your contribution may be tax-deductible.
      • The earnings accumulate tax free until you start taking it out.
      • You pay taxes on the money as you withdraw it once you are retired but must begin to withdraw funds by age 70 1/2.
    1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
  • INDIVIDUAL RETIREMENT ACCOUNTS
    • Roth IRAs.
      • Contributions are not tax deductible, but earnings accumulate with distributions tax free if the money is in the account for at least five years and withdrawals take place after age 591/2 .
      • You can contribute up to $4,000 ($4,500 if age 50 or older) per year if you are single and have an AGI of $95,000 or less or an AGI of $150,000 or less if you are filing jointly.
    1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
    • A Rollover IRA: Traditional IRA that accepts rollovers of your taxable distribution from a retirement plan or other IRA.
    • You decide where your money is invested.
    • Can invest IRA money in a savings account, CD, or growth investments such as stocks, bonds, or mutual funds.
    • SEP-IRA’s are funded by employers.
    • Keogh Plans-for self-employed people.
    Individual Retirement Accounts (continued) 1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
  • THE EDUCATION IRA (RENAMED COVERDELL EDUCATION SAVINGS ACCOUNT)
    • You can give up to $2,000 a year to each child.
    • The accounts grow tax-free, and can be invested any way you choose.
    • The money can be used for elementary and secondary school costs, including books, tuition and tutoring.
    1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
  • WITHDRAWALS FROM IRA’S
    • Lump sum –Taxed as ordinary income.
    • Installments based on life expectancy.
    • Withdrawals prior to age 59 ½ are subject to a 10% tax in addition to the ordinary income tax.
    1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
  • ANNUITIES
    • An annuity provides guaranteed income for life.
    • If you have fully funded all other retirement plan options, including your 401(k), 403b(7), Keogh, and profit-sharing plans but still want more money for retirement you may want to buy an annuity.
    • You can buy an annuity with the proceeds of an IRA, company pension, or as supplemental retirement income.
    • You can buy one with a single payment or with periodic payments.
    1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
  • ANNUITIES
    • You can also buy an annuity by converting the cash value of your life insurance policy into an annuity.
    • Interest accumulates tax free until payments begin.
    • Immediate annuities: payments begin right away.
    • Deferred annuities: income payments begin at some future date. Contributions, and the interest they earn, are tax-deferred until you begin drawing the money out.
    (continued) 1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
  • ANNUITIES
    • Options in annuities allow you to decide which is best for your situation.
      • A straight-life annuity provides more income than any other type, but payments stop when you die.
      • The life-with-period-certain option guarantees the number of payments.
      • A joint-and -survivor annuity pays until the last survivor you designate dies.
      • Do you want a guaranteed fixed return or a variable annuity with a minimum guaranteed and the rest depending on how your investment choices for you annuity dollar are performing?
    (continued) 1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
  • ANTICIPATED SOURCES OF RETIREMENT INCOME Social Security Administration, 1997 1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff Social Security Company pension Part-time work Spouse's pension Savings 12% 27% Other 9% 401(k) 7% 7% 18% IRA 8% Home equity 5% 7%
  • LIVING ON YOUR RETIREMENT INCOME
    • Make sure you receive all retirement income to which you are entitled.
    • Together, your pension and Social Security will cover about 60% of retirement income needs.
    • Determine how much you will need in retirement accounts to supply the other 40%. Plan to accumulate this amount in assets, or plan for post-retirement employment-affects SS benefits.
    • Monitor your investments.
    • Take advantage of all tax savings retirees receive.
    • Develop a spending plan for retirement.
    1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
  • LIVING ON YOUR RETIREMENT INCOME
    • If you have the skills and ability, do some things yourself that you used to hire others to do.
    • Retirees get a variety of tax savings.
    • Fewer senior discounts as boomers retire.
    • Invest some of your retirement income for growth, to allow for inflation and increased health care costs.
    • Dip into savings with caution, since you do not know how long you will live.
    (continued) 1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
  • IRA ACTIVITY
    • Go www.bankrate.com . Explore rates on IRA’s. Share this information with the class.
    • Why might you prefer to invest your IRA in mutual funds or stocks, rather than CD’s?
    1- Department of Human Sciences-- University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff