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Military Career Path StudyRESEARCH
A p r i l 2 0 1 4
Assessing the role of training and certifications
10%
14%
31%
33%
12%
6%
8%
18%
48%
20%
Not at all close to
where expecting to be
Not that close
Moderately close
Very close...
Translating Military Skills to Civilian Roles is a
Challenge Encountered More than Anticipated
13%
21%
27% 28%
35%
38% 39%...
Improving Job Satisfaction Among Military Personnel
Overall
1-5 years
military
experience
6-10 years
military
experience
1...
5%
32%
39%
23%
8%
7%
46%
39%
Don't know / NA
Little/no career guidance
Modest amount
Significant amount of career
guidance...
Anticipated Need for Additional
Training/Education
1%
6%
20%
73%
Don't Know
No, current skill set
is sufficient
Yes, proba...
33%
33%
17%
14%
11%
6%
45%
39%
52%
49%
43%
31%
23%
28%
31%
37%
47%
63%
Attended training/workshop on career planning
Netwo...
Overall
Manage
Others
Do not
Manage
Others
Career
Contents
Career
Discontents
More time set aside for training/professiona...
About this Research
This study and all CompTIA research is one way in which the association re-invests resources in the IT...
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Military IT Career Path Study by CompTIA

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Active duty military personnel overwhelmingly anticipate needing additional education and training to ensure career stability and growth, according to new research by CompTIA, the ICT Industry Trade Association. While a majority of active duty personnel are generally satisfied with where they are in their careers, fewer than one in 10 are completely confident that their existing skill sets will sustain them throughout the remainder of their careers. CompTIA’s Military Career Path Study examines issues related to career planning and professional development for active duty military personnel and service members entering civilian life.

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Transcript of "Military IT Career Path Study by CompTIA"

  1. 1. Military Career Path StudyRESEARCH A p r i l 2 0 1 4 Assessing the role of training and certifications
  2. 2. 10% 14% 31% 33% 12% 6% 8% 18% 48% 20% Not at all close to where expecting to be Not that close Moderately close Very close Exactly where expecting to be with career Active Duty Military Veterans • A NET 68% of active duty military personnel report being exactly or very close to where they expect to be with their career at this stage in their life. • Conversely, less than half (45%) of military veterans in the workforce report satisfaction with their career progress. • Military women and men share roughly the sentiment on their career progress (see Appendix). • The data suggests age and the number of years in the workforce are predictive factors. Active duty personnel in the 40+ age category report being closer to meeting their career objectives than those in the 18-39 category. Similarly, personnel with 11+ years of military experience report higher likelihoods of achieving their career objectives. In some situations it may be a case of younger workers expecting too much too soon. Career Path Progression Versus Expectations Self Assessment of Career Progress Source: CompTIA | Base: 862 U.S. military personnel Active duty, n=377 | Veterans in civilian workforce, n=485
  3. 3. Translating Military Skills to Civilian Roles is a Challenge Encountered More than Anticipated 13% 21% 27% 28% 35% 38% 39% 14% 37% 47% 39% 40% 60% 53% Perceptions of anticipated challenges transitioning to civilian workforce – active duty military Meeting salary requirements Actual challenges encountered – military veterans Finding a job that matches skill & experience level Finding a job that matches career interests Identifying a career path that is a good fit Translating military skills & experience to civilian jobs Lack of relevant jobs in local economy Negative perceptions among employers of military veterans The largest gaps in expectations vs. reality are in the areas of 1). Finding a job that matches skill and experience level, and 2). Translating military skills and experience to civilian jobs. Source: CompTIA | Base: 862 U.S. military personnel Active duty, n=377 | Veterans in civilian workforce, n=485
  4. 4. Improving Job Satisfaction Among Military Personnel Overall 1-5 years military experience 6-10 years military experience 11+years military experience Career contents Career discontents More resources for training/development 58% 44% 64% 66% 56% 64% Access to more tools/technologies 54% 46% 52% 63% 56% 51% More control over direction of career/duty assignments 51% 60% 54% 42% 50% 54% Better pay/allowance 47% 52% 50% 40% 47% 45% More career advancement opportunities 41% 47% 44% 32% 36% 50% Better work-life balance 40% 46% 46% 30% 41% 37% More innovation/willingness to try new ideas 36% 39% 38% 33% 34% 42% More/better career path information 33% 32% 40% 30% 29% 43% More recognition for accomplishments 33% 42% 41% 20% 29% 40% More support for college/education 33% 35% 38% 29% 35% 30% While the majority of military personnel (70%) report feeling comfortable discussing their career objectives with their superiors, less than half (44%) believe their superiors take an active role in helping to guide their careers. Source: CompTIA | Base: 862 U.S. military personnel Active duty, n=377 | Veterans in civilian workforce, n=485
  5. 5. 5% 32% 39% 23% 8% 7% 46% 39% Don't know / NA Little/no career guidance Modest amount Significant amount of career guidance available Active Duty Military Military Veterans • A greater proportion of those who are content with their military career believe there is a significant amount of career guidance (45%) versus those not happy with their military careers (26%). • A larger proportion (30%) of those satisfied with their military career believe that there was significant amount of career path information when compared to those not satisfied (18%). • Years of military experience also influences perception of available information; generally, those with more years of experience believe more career path information is available. Perceptions of the Availability of Military-Provided Career Path Information/Guidance A NET 54% of active duty military personnel rated available career path information/guidance as useful, with the remaining percentage viewing it as in need of some degree of improvement. Consistent with perceptions of availability, personnel happy with their careers give higher marks (64% vs. 34%) Source: CompTIA | Base: 862 U.S. military personnel Active duty, n=377 | Veterans in civilian workforce, n=485
  6. 6. Anticipated Need for Additional Training/Education 1% 6% 20% 73% Don't Know No, current skill set is sufficient Yes, probably Yes, definitely Types of Additional Training/ Education Likely to Pursue 48% 4-year college degree 15% 2-year college degree 38% Graduate degree (e.g. JD, MBA, MD) 64% Information Technology related training 32% Management or business related training 23% Communications related training 9% Trades related training (e.g. automotive, HVAC, electrician, etc.) 7% Services related training (e.g. healthcare field, teaching, etc.) Almost All Military Personnel Anticipate the Need to Add to Their Current Skill Set Expectations for amount of additional training/education: 42% Desire significantly more training/education 43% Desire moderately more training/education Women are relatively more likely to expect to pursue a graduate degree, while men are more likely to expect to pursue IT training. Military personnel currently not that involved in working with technology are relatively more likely to pursue trades related training. Source: CompTIA | Base: 862 U.S. military personnel Active duty, n=377 | Veterans in civilian workforce, n=485
  7. 7. 33% 33% 17% 14% 11% 6% 45% 39% 52% 49% 43% 31% 23% 28% 31% 37% 47% 63% Attended training/workshop on career planning Networked with non-military contacts to understand civilian job opportunities Received career guidance from a supervisor Sought guidance/feedback from a mentor Sought specific assignments to develop new skills/expertise Engaged in self-learning to develop new skills FrequentlyOccasionally Rarely/ Never Those at least somewhat dissatisfied with their military careers attend workshops on career planning at higher rates Career/Professional Development Approaches Time period: steps taken during past two years Source: CompTIA | Base: 862 U.S. military personnel Active duty, n=377 | Veterans in civilian workforce, n=485
  8. 8. Overall Manage Others Do not Manage Others Career Contents Career Discontents More time set aside for training/professional development 59% 61% 53% 59% 60% More refresher training to reinforce / stay current with knowledge 54% 54% 55% 52% 58% More cross-training with other units, branches, etc. 49% 51% 43% 48% 52% More follow-up training to ensure alignment with career goals 45% 46% 40% 43% 48% More e-learning 35% 34% 35% 32% 39% More autonomy – a hand in designing own professional development 29% 28% 31% 25% 37% More simulations/gaming elements 27% 31% 13% 27% 28% More collaborative elements 24% 27% 16% 24% 26% More mobile-based learning (e.g. tablets) 22% 24% 13% 22% 23% Preferences for Improving Training/ Professional Development Source: CompTIA | Base: 862 U.S. military personnel Active duty, n=377 | Veterans in civilian workforce, n=485
  9. 9. About this Research This study and all CompTIA research is one way in which the association re-invests resources in the IT channel. As the voice of the IT industry, CompTIA has hundreds of tools, market intelligence reports and business training programs to help IT channel organizations grow through education, certification, advocacy and philanthropy. The full report is available at no cost to CompTIA members to help them develop and hone their business plans. CompTIA’s Military Career Path study was conducted to examine a number of issues related to career planning and professional development for active military personnel and service members entering civilian life. The goal was to develop better insights into career development expectations, pre and post career training behaviors, perceptions of training methodologies, and civilian life career paths. The objectives of this research include: • Develop better insights into career development expectations • Identify pre and post career training behaviors • Explore perceptions of training methodologies • Explore civilian life career paths The study consists of 5 sections: Section 1: Key Findings Summary Section 2: Military Career Review Section 3: Professional/Career Development for Active Duty Military Personnel and Veterans Section 4: The Role of Certification Section 5: Appendix The data for this study was collected via a quantitative online survey during January, 2014 among 865 active duty military personnel and military veterans that now work in a civilian capacity. The survey sample was drawn from the CompTIA database of 1.75 million+. This was supplemented with independent sample from the third party research supplier, Research Now. See Appendix for detailed respondent profiles. The margin of sampling error at 95% confidence for aggregate results is +/- 3.4 percentage points. Sampling error is larger for subgroups of the data. As with any survey, sampling error is only one source of possible error. While non-sampling error cannot be accurately calculated, precautionary steps were taken in all phases of the survey design, collection and processing of the data to minimize its influence. CompTIA is responsible for all content contained in this series. Any questions regarding the study should be directed to CompTIA Market Research staff at research@comptia.org. CompTIA is a member of the Marketing Research Association (MRA) and adheres to the MRA’s Code of Market Research Ethics and Standards.
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