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Material Handling & Back Safety Training by Gary Beaudette
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Material Handling & Back Safety Training by Gary Beaudette

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Material Handling & Back Safety Training by Gary Beaudette Material Handling & Back Safety Training by Gary Beaudette Presentation Transcript

  • Material Handling andMaterial Handling and Back Safety TrainingBack Safety Training Gary BeaudetteGary Beaudette Safety OfficerSafety Officer Environmental Health, Safety,Environmental Health, Safety, and Risk Managementand Risk Management Some information provided by Oklahoma State University For better viewing, please select ‘slide show’
  • According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics,According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, more thanmore than one million workersone million workers suffer backsuffer back injuries each year, and back injuries accountinjuries each year, and back injuries account forfor one of every five workplace injuriesone of every five workplace injuries One fourth of all compensation claims involve backOne fourth of all compensation claims involve back injuries, which cost employersinjuries, which cost employers billions of dollarsbillions of dollars Add to that the employees’ painAdd to that the employees’ pain and suffering…and suffering… IntroductionIntroduction
  • Material Handling and Lifting InjuriesMaterial Handling and Lifting Injuries are exceedinglyare exceedingly painful, difficult to healpainful, difficult to heal ,, and have anand have an effect on everything you doeffect on everything you do After suffering just one back injury, youAfter suffering just one back injury, you are much more likely to experienceare much more likely to experience another one later onanother one later on It is important toIt is important to learnlearn how to avoidhow to avoid injuring orinjuring or re-injuring your backre-injuring your back
  • ObjectivesObjectives At the end of this presentation, you shouldAt the end of this presentation, you should be familiar with the following topics:be familiar with the following topics:  Forces involved with liftingForces involved with lifting  Risky moves associated with liftingRisky moves associated with lifting  Contributing factors to materials handling/lifting injuriesContributing factors to materials handling/lifting injuries  Injury preventionInjury prevention  Proper lifting proceduresProper lifting procedures  Using theUsing the Calculator For Analyzing Lifting OperationsCalculator For Analyzing Lifting Operations  Body ManagementBody Management  Work-specific training requirementsWork-specific training requirements
  • The Forces InvolvedThe Forces Involved The amount of force placed on your back under certain conditions canThe amount of force placed on your back under certain conditions can be surprising.be surprising. Anytime you bend or lean over to pick something upAnytime you bend or lean over to pick something up without bending your knees, you put tremendous pressure on yourwithout bending your knees, you put tremendous pressure on your lower back.lower back. Think of your back as a lever. With theThink of your back as a lever. With the fulcrum in the center of the lever, it onlyfulcrum in the center of the lever, it only takes ten pounds of pressure to lift atakes ten pounds of pressure to lift a ten pound object.ten pound object. However, if you shift the fulcrum to one side, it takes much more force toHowever, if you shift the fulcrum to one side, it takes much more force to lift the same object.lift the same object. Your waist actually acts like the fulcrum in aYour waist actually acts like the fulcrum in a lever system, and it is not centered. In fact, it operates on alever system, and it is not centered. In fact, it operates on a 10:110:1 ratioratio. Lifting a ten pound object actually puts 100 pounds of. Lifting a ten pound object actually puts 100 pounds of pressure on your lower back.pressure on your lower back.
  • The Forces InvolvedThe Forces Involved When youWhen you add in the 105 poundsadd in the 105 pounds of the average human upper torsoof the average human upper torso,, you see that lifting a ten poundyou see that lifting a ten pound objectobject actually puts 1,150 poundsactually puts 1,150 pounds of pressureof pressure on the lower back.on the lower back. Given these figures, it is easy toGiven these figures, it is easy to see howsee how repetitive lifting andrepetitive lifting and bending can quickly cause backbending can quickly cause back problemsproblems. Even leaning forward. Even leaning forward while sitting at a desk or table canwhile sitting at a desk or table can eventually lead to back relatedeventually lead to back related problems.problems.
  • Risky MovesRisky Moves Certain actions are more likely to cause backCertain actions are more likely to cause back injuries than others. Anytime you find yourselfinjuries than others. Anytime you find yourself doing one of these things, you should think:doing one of these things, you should think: DANGER!DANGER! My back is at risk!My back is at risk! Heavy liftingHeavy lifting...especially repetitive...especially repetitive lifting over a long period of timelifting over a long period of time Twisting at the waistTwisting at the waist while lifting orwhile lifting or holding a heavy load. (This frequentlyholding a heavy load. (This frequently happens when using a shovel.)happens when using a shovel.) Reaching and liftingReaching and lifting ...over your head,...over your head, across a table, or out the back of a truck.across a table, or out the back of a truck.
  • More Risky MovesMore Risky Moves Lifting or carrying objects withLifting or carrying objects with awkward or odd shapesawkward or odd shapes Working in awkward, uncomfortableWorking in awkward, uncomfortable positionspositions...gardening, kneeling, tasks that...gardening, kneeling, tasks that require you to bend over for long periods of time...require you to bend over for long periods of time... Also, sitting or standing for too longAlso, sitting or standing for too long without shifting.without shifting.
  • The further you bend, and the more youThe further you bend, and the more you extend your arms, the more significantextend your arms, the more significant the risk of injury!the risk of injury!
  • Other Causes of InjuriesOther Causes of Injuries  It is also possible to injure yourselfIt is also possible to injure yourself slipping on a wet floor or iceslipping on a wet floor or ice  Tripping or falling over obstacles inTripping or falling over obstacles in the walkwaythe walkway  Improper use of lifting of moving equipmentImproper use of lifting of moving equipment
  • Contributing Factors toContributing Factors to Handling/Lifting InjuriesHandling/Lifting Injuries Poor Physical Condition…Poor Physical Condition…  Your stomach muscles provide a lot of theYour stomach muscles provide a lot of the support needed by your back. If you have weak,support needed by your back. If you have weak, flabby stomach muscles, your back may not get allflabby stomach muscles, your back may not get all the support it needs, especially when you're liftingthe support it needs, especially when you're lifting or carrying heavy objects. Good physical conditionor carrying heavy objects. Good physical condition in general is important for preventing strains,in general is important for preventing strains, sprains, and other injuries.sprains, and other injuries.
  • Poor posture…Poor posture…  Is another contributing factor. When yourIs another contributing factor. When your mother told you to sit and stand up straight,mother told you to sit and stand up straight, she was giving you good advice. It is best toshe was giving you good advice. It is best to try to maintain the back in its natural "S"try to maintain the back in its natural "S" shaped curve. You want to avoid leaningshaped curve. You want to avoid leaning forward (unsupported) when you sit, orforward (unsupported) when you sit, or hunching over while you're standing.hunching over while you're standing. Contributing Factors toContributing Factors to Handling/Lifting InjuriesHandling/Lifting Injuries
  • Contributing Factors toContributing Factors to Handling/Lifting InjuriesHandling/Lifting Injuries Extra weight…Extra weight…  Can be a big problem. RememberCan be a big problem. Remember the fulcrum / lever principle? Thethe fulcrum / lever principle? The more you weigh, the more stress itmore you weigh, the more stress it puts on your back every time youputs on your back every time you bend over--on a 10:1 ratio.bend over--on a 10:1 ratio.
  • Contributing Factors toContributing Factors to Handling/Lifting InjuriesHandling/Lifting Injuries Stress…Stress…  Tense muscles areTense muscles are more susceptible tomore susceptible to strains and spasms.strains and spasms.
  • Contributing Factors toContributing Factors to Handling/Lifting InjuriesHandling/Lifting Injuries Overdoing it…Overdoing it…  Don’t be afraid to say,Don’t be afraid to say, “This is too“This is too heavy for me to lift alone.”heavy for me to lift alone.” It’s important to recognize your physicalIt’s important to recognize your physical limitations and abilities. Many people havelimitations and abilities. Many people have injured their backs because they were afraidinjured their backs because they were afraid toto ask for help.ask for help.
  • Preventing Back InjuriesPreventing Back Injuries The best way to prevent back injuries is toThe best way to prevent back injuries is to developdevelop habitshabits that reduce the strain placed on the back. Therethat reduce the strain placed on the back. There are some basic things you can do to help.are some basic things you can do to help. Avoid Lifting and Bending Whenever You Can!Avoid Lifting and Bending Whenever You Can! Place objects up off the floor. If you can setPlace objects up off the floor. If you can set Something down on a table or other elevatedSomething down on a table or other elevated surface instead of on the floor, do it so you won'tsurface instead of on the floor, do it so you won't have to reach down to pick it up again.have to reach down to pick it up again. Raise / lower shelvesRaise / lower shelves. The best zone for lifting is. The best zone for lifting is between your shoulders and your waist. Put heavierbetween your shoulders and your waist. Put heavier objects on shelves at waist level, lighter objects onobjects on shelves at waist level, lighter objects on lower or higher shelves.lower or higher shelves.
  • Preventing Back InjuriesPreventing Back Injuries Use carts and dolliesUse carts and dollies to move objects, instead of carrying themto move objects, instead of carrying them yourself.yourself. (Remember that it is better on your back to push carts(Remember that it is better on your back to push carts than it is to pull them.)than it is to pull them.) Use cranes, hoists, lift tablesUse cranes, hoists, lift tables, and other lift-assist devices, and other lift-assist devices whenever you can.whenever you can.
  • Use Proper Lifting ProceduresUse Proper Lifting Procedures  You can't always avoid lifting, but there are waysYou can't always avoid lifting, but there are ways to reduce the amount of pressure placed on theto reduce the amount of pressure placed on the back when you do soback when you do so  By bending the knees, you keep your spine in aBy bending the knees, you keep your spine in a better alignment, and you essentially take awaybetter alignment, and you essentially take away the lever principle forces.the lever principle forces.  Instead of using your back like a crane, youInstead of using your back like a crane, you allow your legs to do the work.allow your legs to do the work.
  • Use Proper Lifting ProceduresUse Proper Lifting Procedures  Take a balanced stance with your feetTake a balanced stance with your feet about a shoulder-width apart. one footabout a shoulder-width apart. one foot can be behind the object and thecan be behind the object and the other next to it.other next to it.  Squat down to lift the object, but keepSquat down to lift the object, but keep your heels off the floor. Get as closeyour heels off the floor. Get as close to the object as you can. Keep yourto the object as you can. Keep your back straight.back straight.  Use your palms (not just your fingers)Use your palms (not just your fingers) to get a secure grip on the load.to get a secure grip on the load. Make sure you'll be able to maintain aMake sure you'll be able to maintain a hold on the object without switchinghold on the object without switching your grip later.your grip later.
  • Use Proper Lifting ProceduresUse Proper Lifting Procedures  Lift gradually (without jerking) using your leg, abdominal and buttockLift gradually (without jerking) using your leg, abdominal and buttock muscles andmuscles and keeping the load as close to youkeeping the load as close to you as possible. Keepas possible. Keep your chin tucked in so as to keep a relatively straight back and neckyour chin tucked in so as to keep a relatively straight back and neck line.line.  Once you're standing, change directions byOnce you're standing, change directions by pointing your feet in the direction you wantpointing your feet in the direction you want to go and turning your whole body.to go and turning your whole body. AvoidAvoid twistingtwisting at your waist while carrying a load.at your waist while carrying a load.  By following these lifting guidelines and byBy following these lifting guidelines and by practicing good body/back management,practicing good body/back management, you can prevent back injuries on the job andyou can prevent back injuries on the job and at home.at home.
  • Other Lifting TipsOther Lifting Tips  Reduce the amount of weight liftedReduce the amount of weight lifted .. If you're movingIf you're moving a bunch of books, better to load several small boxes thana bunch of books, better to load several small boxes than one extremely heavy loadone extremely heavy load  Keep aKeep a clear view aheadclear view ahead when carrying/moving a load.when carrying/moving a load. Never carry a load in front of your face as it forces you toNever carry a load in front of your face as it forces you to lean or twist and upsets your balancelean or twist and upsets your balance  Use handles and lifting strapsUse handles and lifting straps  Push a dolly or cart in a linear motion. NeverPush a dolly or cart in a linear motion. Never pull, as it forces you to twist at the waist!pull, as it forces you to twist at the waist!  Get helpGet help if the shape is too awkward or the object is tooif the shape is too awkward or the object is too heavy for you to lift and move by yourself!heavy for you to lift and move by yourself!
  • How to determine if the load youHow to determine if the load you are moving is “too much.”are moving is “too much.”  Use theUse the Calculator For Analyzing LiftingCalculator For Analyzing Lifting Operations FormOperations Form……. on next slide……. on next slide  Easy to use formula based on factors suchEasy to use formula based on factors such as the weight to be lifted, at whatas the weight to be lifted, at what position you begin the lift from, the frequencyposition you begin the lift from, the frequency of lifting, and if twisting is involvedof lifting, and if twisting is involved Simple result lets you know if lifting theSimple result lets you know if lifting the load could be hazardousload could be hazardous or notor not
  • What is too heavy?What is too heavy?
  •  It's important toIt's important to know your body'sknow your body's limitationslimitations, and it's important to, and it's important to be awarebe aware of your body positionof your body position at all timesat all times  Learn toLearn to recognizerecognize those situationsthose situations where your back is most a risk: bending,where your back is most a risk: bending, lifting, reaching, twisting, etc.lifting, reaching, twisting, etc.  Then take measures to avoid an injury byThen take measures to avoid an injury by using this training whenever you handleusing this training whenever you handle or lift materialsor lift materials Practice BodyPractice Body ManagementManagement
  • Finally…….Finally……. Don’t forget the 4 most commonDon’t forget the 4 most common causes of back injurycauses of back injury  BendingBending  ReachingReaching  TwistingTwisting  Heavy LiftingHeavy Lifting
  • Very Important…..Very Important….. Contact our department forContact our department for additional training…additional training…  Your job may require the use of specialized toolsYour job may require the use of specialized tools or equipment, not mentioned in this lesson, toor equipment, not mentioned in this lesson, to help facilitate the handling and movement ofhelp facilitate the handling and movement of materialsmaterials  Training is available for material handlingTraining is available for material handling activities specific to YOUR work area!activities specific to YOUR work area!  Actual hands-on training and practice, where theActual hands-on training and practice, where the content of this course is applied, should becontent of this course is applied, should be completed as soon as possible.completed as soon as possible.  Call us to schedule…. 474-5413Call us to schedule…. 474-5413
  • Please complete the quizPlease complete the quiz  Quiz is located at:Quiz is located at: www.uaf.edu/safetywww.uaf.edu/safety  TrainingTraining  UAF Safety Training PowerpointsUAF Safety Training Powerpoints  Complete quiz, click the “send quiz to EHS&RM” button.Complete quiz, click the “send quiz to EHS&RM” button.  NOTE:NOTE: There is no need to contact EHS&RM to let us knowThere is no need to contact EHS&RM to let us know you have finished the quiz. fysafety@uaf.edu is checkedyou have finished the quiz. fysafety@uaf.edu is checked throughout the day, and your score will be electronically filedthroughout the day, and your score will be electronically filed for future reference.for future reference.