First Aid CPR AED by American Heart Association

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  • Thank you for the introduction XX and thank you everyone for joining today’s webinar. This is an exciting time at the American Heart Association. As you may know, we came out with the new guidelines for CPR in October of 2010, released our new curriculum for our First Aid, CPR, and AED classroom courses in April of this year, and recently release our new curriculum for our First Aid, CPR, and AED eLearning courses.
    Considering the advancements in technology and the economy, many companies are looking for cost-effective and innovative ways to continue training their employees in First Aid, CPR, AED, and Bloodborne Pathogens. And those are some of the areas I’ll discuss during today’s webinar.
    I’ll also discuss more at length some First Aid basics and how to properly administer CPR, and use an AED.
  • During today’s webcast, you’ll learn:
    Some First Aid basics
    How to provide First Aid for some medical, injury, and environmental emergencies
    How to provide CPR and use an AED
    Training options you can use through the American Heart Association to get your employees trained
    And then we’ll wrap things up with a Q&A segment. During the Q&A segment, we’ll have a panel of our experts in Science and Training to help answer any of your questions.
  • So, what is First Aid? First Aid is the immediate care you give someone with an illness or injury before someone with more advanced training, such as Emergency Medical Services (EMS), arrives. Giving First Aid may help someone recover more completely and quickly and it may mean the difference between life and death. In the next couple of slides, I’ll talk about some First Aid basics.
  • Some people may be required to perform First Aid while working. For example, first responders, law enforcement officers, firefighters, flight attendants, security guards, lifeguards, and park rangers may have a duty to give first aid when they are working. If they are off-duty, they can choose whether or not to provide first aid. Providing first aid may be part of your job description. If so, you must help while you’re working. Before you provide first aid, it’s important to ask the ill or injured person if you may help.
  • In your workplace, you may have a first aid kit. The first aid kit contains supplies you might need in an emergency. Not all first aid kits contain the same supplies. Your company will decide what the first aid kit should have in it. Some important things you should remember about the First Aid Kit are to:
    Keep the supplies in a sturdy, watertight container that is clearly labeled
    Know where the first aid kit is
    Replace what you use so the kit will be ready if another emergency occurs.
    Check the kit at the beginning of each work period for expired supplies and to make sure it is complete and ready for an emergency.
  • You may have to give first aid in dangerous places. The ill or injured person may be in a room with poisonous fumes, on a busy street, or in a parking lot. Before doing anything else, make sure the scene is safe for you and the injured person. Keep looking around to make sure that the scene stays safe. You can’t help anyone if you’re injured yourself. As you approach the scene, consider the following:
    Look out for danger to you and the injured person. Move the injured person only if they’re in danger or if you need to move them to provide first aid or CPR. Move them safely if you can.
    Look for people who can help you and look for telephones. Have someone phone your emergency response number (or 911). Phone for help yourself if no one else is around.
    Identify who’s injured. Figure out how many people are hurt and see if you can tell what happened.
    Be able to identify where you are and be specific. The emergency response team (or 911) dispatcher will want to know your address, floor, or location in the building or property.
  • Bloodborne diseases are caused by germs. A rescuer may catch a disease if germs in someone else’s blood or body fluids enter the rescuer’s body, which is often through the rescuer’s mouth or eye or a cut on the skin. To be safe, rescuers should wear personal protective equipment, such as gloves and eye shields (goggles), to keep from touching the injured person’s blood or body fluids. Three examples of bloodborne diseases are
    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the virus that causes AIDS
    Hepatitis B
    Hepatitis C
  • Every workplace should have a plan for an emergency. This tells workers who, how, and sometimes when to phone for help in an emergency. As a general rule, you should phone the emergency response number (or 911) and ask for help whenever someone is seriously ill or injured and if you are not sure what to do in an emergency. Here are some examples of someone who is seriously ill or injured. The person:
    Does not respond to voice or touch
    Has chest discomfort
    Has signs of stroke
    Has a problem breathing
    Has a severe injury or burn
    Has a seizure
    Suddenly can’t move a part of the body
  • After you check the scene to be sure it is safe, you must find out what the problem is before you give first aid. The following steps will help you find out what the problem is. They are listed in order of importance, with the most important step listed first.
    1. When you arrive at the scene, check the scene to be sure it is safe. As you walk toward the ill or injured person, try to look for signs of the cause of the problem.
    2. Check whether the person responds. Tap the person and shout, “Are you OK?”
    A person who responds and is awake may be able to answer your questions. Tell the person you’re there to help, ask permission to help, and ask
    what the problem is.
    A person may only be able to move, moan, or groan when you tap them and shout. If so phone or send someone to phone your emergency
    response number (or 911) and get the first aid kit and AED.
    3. Next, check if the person is breathing. If the person isn’t breathing or is only gasping, begin CPR and use an AED if you know how.
    If you’re not trained and don’t know CPR, give Hands-Only CPR.
    4. Next, look for any obvious signs of injury, such as bleeding, broken bones, burns, or bites.
    5. Finally, look for medical information jewelry. This tells you if the person has a serious medical condition.
  • In the next couple of slides, I’ll talk about how to provide first aid for some medical emergencies.
  • Someone may develop mild or severe blockage of the air passages. Someone having a heart attack, having a stroke, or experiencing certain
    injuries may also have breathing problems. You can tell if someone is having trouble breathing if the person:
    Is breathing very fast or very slowly
    Is having trouble with every breath
    Has noisy breathing—you hear a sound or whistle as the air enters or leaves the lungs
    Can only make sounds or speak no more than a few words at a time in between breaths, although the person is trying to say more
    Many people with medical conditions, such as asthma, know about their conditions and carry inhaler medicine that can make them feel better within minutes of using it. Sometimes people have so much trouble breathing they need help using their inhalers. You may need to help them.
  • Follow these steps for someone who is having breathing problems:
    Make sure the scene is safe.
    Ask the person if she has medicine. If she needs her medicine but is too sick to get it herself, get it for her.
    Ask the person if you have the right medicine.
    Assemble and use the inhaler.
    5 Phone the your emergency response number (or 911) if
    The person has no medicine
    The person does not get better after using her medicine
    The person’s breathing gets worse, the person has trouble speaking, or the person stops responding
    Stay with the person until someone with more advanced training arrives and takes over.
    See if the person needs CPR. If he does, give CPR. If you don’t know how, give Hands-Only CPR.
  • If someone is choking, they might use the choking sign. When a person is choking, they typically hold the neck with one or both hands as you see in this image.
  • Follow these steps to help a choking adult:
    If you think someone is choking, ask, “Are you choking?” If they nod yes, tell them you are going to help.
    Get behind them. Wrap your arms around them so that your hands are in front.
    Make a fist with 1 hand.
    Put the thumb side of your fist slightly above his belly button and well below the breastbone.
    Grasp the fist with your other hand and give quick upward thrusts into his abdomen.
    Give thrusts until the object is forced out and he can breathe, cough, or talk, or until he stops responding.
  • Many allergic reactions are mild. Some reactions that seem mild can become severe within minutes. People can be allergic to many things, including:
    Many foods such as eggs, nuts, chocolate
    Insect stings or bites, especially bee or wasp stings
    Some states and organizations permit first aid rescuers to help people use their epinephrine pens. People who carry epinephrine pens usually know when and how to use them. You may help give the injection if you are approved to do so by your state regulations and by your company.
  • An epinephrine pen will help someone with a severe allergic reaction breathe more easily. It contains a small amount of medicine that can be injected through clothing. It usually takes several minutes before the medicine starts to work. The epinephrine injection is given in the side of the thigh.
  • To use an epinephrine pen:
    Get the prescribed epinephrine pen.
    Take off the safety cap. Follow the instructions on the pen.
    Hold the epinephrine pen in your fist without touching either end because the needle comes out of one end.
    Push the end with the needle hard against the side of the person’s thigh, about halfway between the hip and knee. Give the injection
    through clothes or on bare skin.
    Hold the pen in place for about 10 seconds.
    Remove the needle by pulling the pen straight out.
  • In the next couple of slides, I’ll talk about how to provide first aid for some injury emergencies.
  • Bleeding often looks worse than it is. When a large blood vessel is cut or torn, the person can lose a lot of blood within minutes. However, you can stop most bleeding with pressure. If the injured person can help you, ask them to put direct pressure on the wound while you put on your personal protective equipment (PPE). A dressing is a wound covering used to stop bleeding. It helps prevent infection. A dressing can be a gauze pad or any other clean piece of cloth or even a gloved hand.
  • Take the following actions to stop bleeding that you can see:
    Make sure the scene is safe. Get the first aid kit. Wear PPE.
    Put a dressing on the wound. Apply direct pressure on the dressing. Use the flat part of your fingers or the palm of your hand.
    If the bleeding does not stop, add more dressings on top of the first and press harder.
    Keep pressure on the wound until it stops bleeding.
    If you can’t keep pressure on the wound, wrap a bandage firmly over the dressing to hold the dressing in place.
    Small wounds heal better and with less infection if an antibiotic ointment or cream is used. Apply antibiotic ointment or cream and then a clean dressing, but only if the wound is a small scrape or surface cut and only if the person doesn’t have any allergies to the antibiotic.
    If the cut or scrape is minor, wash the area with lots of clean water to get the wound clean before applying the dressings. You’ll use less direct pressure to stop the bleeding for a minor cut or scrape than for a major cut or scrape.
  • A bandage is material used to protect or cover an injured body part. A bandage may also help keep pressure on the wound.
    Make sure the scene is safe. Get the first aid kit and wear PPE.
    Use direct pressure, with gauze pads/dressings if available, to stop any bleeding.
    Apply the bandage over the dressings.
  • Burns are injuries that can be caused by contact with heat, electricity, or chemicals. Heat burns can be caused by contact with fire, a hot surface, a hot liquid, or steam. Use cool water on burns. Ice can damage burned areas. If someone with a burn gets too cold, they can get hypothermia (which is a low body temperature).
  • These are the actions and steps you should take for small and large burns. For small burns, if possible, hold the burned area under cold running
    water. For large burns, cover the person with a dry blanket to keep the person warm because once the skin has burned, the person can no longer control body temperature well and often gets cold.
  • Electricity can burn the body on the inside and outside. Electricity can stop breathing or cause a deadly abnormal heart rhythm. Electricity may leave only small marks on the body. No one can tell how much damage there is inside the body based on the marks on the outside.
  • Follow these steps for giving first aid for an electrical injury.
    You should also stay clear of the injured person as long as they’re in contact with a power source that is on. Electricity can travel from the source through the injured person to you. Turn off the main power switch only if you know how and can safely do so. Once the power is off, you may touch the injured person.
    If the electrical injury is caused by high voltage, such as a fallen power line, electricity can travel through everything that touches the power line or source (even a wooden stick). Wait until the power has been turned off to enter the area and provide help.
    Many people have heard about different ointments for burns. The only thing you should put on a burn is cool water and clean dressings unless you are given other instructions by a healthcare provider.
  • In the next couple of slides, I’ll talk about how to provide first aid for some environmental emergencies.
  • Usually insect and spider bites and stings causeonly mild pain, itching, and swelling at the bite. Some insect bites can be serious and even fatal if
    The person bitten has a severe allergic reaction to the bite or sting
    Poison (venom) is injected into the person (for example, from a black widow spider or brown recluse spider)
  • Follow these steps to give first aid to someone with a bite or sting. You should also make sure you remove the stinger with something flat and dull that won’t squeeze the stinger. Squeezing the venom sac can release more venom (poison).
  • Most heat-related emergencies are caused by vigorous exercise. Heat cramps are painful muscle spasms, most often in the calves, arms, stomach
    muscles, and back. Signs of heat cramps include muscle cramps, sweating, and headache.
  • These are the actions you should take if a person has heat cramps. It’s also important to note that once heat cramp symptoms stop, the person can exercise again. Stretching, icing, and massaging painful muscles may be helpful.
    A bag with ice and water and wrapped in a towel may be applied to the sore muscle for up to 20 minutes if the person can tolerate it. Mild heat-related signs are a warning that the person’s condition may get worse unless you take action. Symptoms of heat-related emergencies often increase if left untreated.
  • Heat exhaustion is a serious condition that often turns into heat stroke. It often occurs when someone exercises in the heat and sweats a lot.
    Signs of heat exhaustion include sweating, nausea, dizziness, vomiting, muscle cramps, feeling faint, and fatigue.
  • Follow these steps for heat exhaustion.
    Make sure the scene is safe. Get the first aid kit. Wear PPE.
    Phone or ask someone to phone your emergency response number (or 911).
    Have the person lie down in a cool place.
    Remove as much of the person’s clothing as possible.
    Cool the person with a cool water spray.
  • In the next couple of slides, I’ll talk about how to provide CPR and use AED’s.
  • As you may know, the American Heart Association came out with the new guidelines for CPR & Emergency Cardiovascular Care in October 2010. The biggest change is the new sequence for CPR. The sequence for CPR has changed from A-B-C to C-A-B. You may be asking yourself why the change?
    Because of delays in compressions associated with time needed to open the airway and give breaths
    The new sequence allows chest compressions to begin sooner
    For adults with a witnessed cardiac arrest and ventricular fibrillation, chest compressions and early defibrillation are critical
    Most victims receive no bystander CPR, which may be due to the A-B-C sequence, which started with the most difficult task
  • CPR has 2 main parts: compressions and giving breaths. Pushing hard and fast on the chest is the most important part of CPR. When
    you push on the chest, you pump blood to the brain and heart. A compression is the act of pushing on the chest. People often don’t push hard enough because they’re afraid of hurting the victim. An injury is unlikely, but it is better than death. It’s better to push too hard than not hard enough.
  • These are the actions you should take when giving CPR:
    Make sure the person is lying on they’re back on a firm, flat surface.
    Move clothes out of the way.
    Put the heel of 1 hand on the lower half of the breastbone. Put the heel of your other hand on top of the first hand.
    Push straight down at least 2 inches at a rate of at least 100 compressions a minute.
    After each compression, let the chest come back up to its normal position
    Compressions are very important and doing them correctly is tiring. The more tired you are, the less effective your compressions are. If someone else knows CPR, take turns. Switch about every 2 minutes, moving quickly to keep the pause between compressions as short as possible. Remind each other to push down at least 2 inches, push at a rate of at least 100 compressions a minute, and let the chest come back up to its normal position after each compression.
  • Compressions are the most important part of CPR. If you’re also able to give breaths, you will help even more. Your breaths need to make the chest rise. When the chest rises, you know the person has taken in enough air.
  • Before giving breaths, open the airway. Follow these steps to open the airway:
    Put 1 hand on the forehead and the fingers of your other on the bony part of the chin.
    Tilt the head back and lift the chin as seen on this image.
    You should avoid pressing on the soft part of the neck or under the chin.
  • To give breaths:
    Hold the airway open, pinch the nose closed
    Take a breath. Cover the person’s mouth with your mouth.
    Give 2 breaths (blow for 1 second each). Watch for the chest to begin to rise as you give each breath.
    If you give someone a breath and the chest doesn’t rise, allow the head to go back to its normal position. Then open the airway again by tilting the head and lifting the chin. Then give another breath. Make sure the chest rises. Don’t interrupt compressions for more than 10 seconds to give breaths. If the chest doesn’t rise within 10 seconds, begin pushing hard and fast on the chest again.
    During CPR, there is very little chance you can catch a disease. Some workplaces require rescuers to have masks. Masks are made of firm plastic and fit over the ill or injured person’s mouth or mouth and nose. You may need to put the mask together before you use it.
  • Sometimes a heart doesn’t work right. An AED is a machine with a computer in it that can shock the heart and help it work properly again. If you start CPR right away and then use an AED within a few minutes, you will have the best chance of saving a life.
    AEDs are safe, accurate, and easy to use. The AED will figure out if the person needs a shock and will tell you to give one if needed. It will even tell you when to make sure no one is touching the person. The pads used to shock the person have a diagram showing you where to place them. The most common ways to turn on an AED are to push an “ON” button or lift the lid of the AED. Once you turn on the AED, it will tell you everything you need to do.
    If you have access to an AED, use it as quickly as possible. Make sure no one is touching the victim just before you push the “SHOCK” button. If you can’t find an AED quickly, then start CPR. Push hard and push fast.
  • The statistics you see in front of you re-emphasize the importance of having an AED program. It’s scary to know that less than one-third of victims receive bystander CPR and even fewer receive bystander defibrillation.
    All workplaces are potential candidates for AED programs because of the possibility of SCA and the need for timely defibrillation. Each workplace should assess its own requirements for an AED program as part of its first-aid response.
    A number of issues should be considered in setting up a worksite AED program: physician oversight; compliance with local, state and federal regulations; coordination with local EMS; a quality assurance program; and a periodic review, among others.
  • In the next couple of slides, I’ll talk about how you can train your employees in First Aid CPR AED.
  • These are our Heartsaver Courses that are intended for anyone with limited or no medical who needs First Aid, CPR, AED or Bloodborne Pathogens training for job, regulatory, or other requirements. As you can see on the table, we offer classroom and eLearning courses.
    The first column are the course name for each course we offer. The second column indicates the estimated time it takes to complete each eLearning course. And the third column is the estimated time it takes to complete each classroom course.
  • Our Heartsaver eLearning courses can be completed in three parts. Part 1 is the online portion, is self-directed and can be completed at work, home, or wherever you have Internet access. Once you successfully complete Part 1, you’ll print out a certificate and take it with you to complete your hands-on skills practice and testing session. The skills practice and testing session are Parts 2 and 3, are hands-on, and are conducted in-person with an AHA Instructor.
    The primary benefits of using our Heartsaver eLearning courses are:
    Saved time and money in which employees can maintain on-the-job productivity levels.
    Convenience in which employees can complete courses anytime or anywhere with Internet access.
    Flexibility in which your employees can learn at their own pace, according to their learning styles and schedules. eLearning will also help your company overcome obstacles such as scheduling, reaching employees in remote locations, and diverse learning styles.
    And lastly consistency in which the same content and curriculum delivered to all employees.
  • Our Heartsaver Classroom courses are conducted in a classroom setting and can also be conducted onsite at your location or at an authorized AHA Training Center in your local area. These classroom courses offer hands-on coaching and feedback and group interaction.
  • These are the options available to you to train your employees.
    HeartQuarters Training is a full-service national training solution for companies and organizations that need to train a large amount of employees in one or multiple locations. HeartQuarters will provide you with one point of contact, one contract, and consistent pricing all on one invoice.
    If your company or organizations is using a proprietary or internal Learning Management System (or LMS), there is a possibility that we can link AHA content directly to your LMS platform via Direct Links.
    If you company does not use a commercial or proprietary Learning Management System (LMS), you can consider an AHA Pro Package which will provide access to AHA online content as well as an online key manager to help you track student data and course completions.
    We also have over 3,400 authorized Training Centers around the globe. Our Training Centers could be a fire department, hospital, college or university, or an independently owned business in your local area.
  • Before we begin the Q&A segment, I wanted to provide you with a couple of resources.
    If you would like to learn more about our Heartsaver eLearning courses, visit www.OnlineAHA.org. Click on “Course Catalog” and scroll to “Workplace Training” for more information about our Heartsaver eLearning courses.
    To find out more information about HeartQuarters Training, visit www.heart.org/heartquarters.
    To find an authorized American Heart Association Training Center in your local area, visit www.heart.org/eccclassconnector. From there, all you have to do is input your zip code and a mileage radius and your screen will populate with a list of AHA Training Centers within your area.
    If you need more information about becoming an AHA Instructor, visit www.heart.org/instructor.
  • Unfortunately, accidents and injuries happen on the job. Just like you may train your employees in areas such as ergonomics, equipment handling, proper lifting, and handling personal protective equipment (PPE), it’s also important to train your employees in First Aid, CPR, AED use and Bloodborne Pathogens so they’ll be able to quickly respond to an accident or injury.
    Although classroom-based training is an option for you, our eLearning courses can be just as effective as our classroom-based courses which can save you time and money.
    Thank you so much for your time today. I’ll now turn it over to Thomas to begin our Q&A segment . . .
  • First Aid CPR AED by American Heart Association

    1. 1. “Improve the Safety of Your Workers by Training Them in First Aid CPR AED” Date: Wednesday, November 2, 2011 Time: 1:00 PM (CDT), 2:00 PM (EDT)
    2. 2. Webcast Outline • First Aid Basics • Medical Emergencies • Injury Emergencies • Environmental Emergencies • CPR and AED • Training Options • Q&A Segment
    3. 3. First Aid Basics
    4. 4. Deciding to Provide First Aid • Some people may be required to perform First Aid while working • If they are off-duty, they can choose whether or not to provide First Aid • Providing First Aid may be part of your job description • Before you provide First Aid, it’s important to ask the ill or injured person if you may help
    5. 5. Supplying the First Aid Kit • Contains supplies you might need in an emergency • Not all contain the same supplies • Keep the supplies in a sturdy, watertight container that is clearly labeled • Know where the First Aid kit is • Replace what you use • Check it at the beginning of each work period
    6. 6. Assessing the Scene • Look out for danger to you and the injured person • Look for people who can help you and look for telephones • Who’s injured? • Where are they?
    7. 7. Exposure to Blood • Bloodborne diseases are caused by germs • A rescuer may catch a disease if germs in someone else’s blood or body fluids enter the rescuer’s body • Rescuers should wear personal protective equipment (PPE) to keep from touching the injured person’s blood or body fluids
    8. 8. When to Phone for Help • Ask for help whenever: – Someone is seriously ill or injured – You are not sure what to do • Examples of someone who is seriously ill or injured: – Does not respond to voice or touch – Has chest discomfort – Has signs of stroke – Has a problem breathing
    9. 9. Finding the Problem • Check the scene to be sure it is safe • Tap the person and shout “Are you OK?” • Check if the person is breathing • Look for signs of injury such as bleeding, broken bones, burns or bites • Look for medical information jewelry
    10. 10. Medical Emergencies
    11. 11. General Breathing Problems • Is breathing very fast or slow • Is having trouble with every breath • Has noisy breathing • Can only make sounds or speak no more than a few words at a time in between breaths
    12. 12. Helping with Breathing Problems
    13. 13. Helping a Choking Adult • If someone is choking, they might use the choking sign
    14. 14. Helping a Choking Adult
    15. 15. Allergic Reactions • People can be allergic to many things, including: – Foods such as eggs, nuts, and chocolate – Insect stings or bites, especially bee or wasp stings
    16. 16. Using Epinephrine Pens • Will help someone with a severe allergic reaction breathe more easily • Contains a small amount of medicine that can be injected through clothing • Takes several minutes before the medicine starts to work • Injection is given in the side of the thigh
    17. 17. Using Epinephrine Pens
    18. 18. Injury Emergencies
    19. 19. Bleeding You can See • When a large blood vessel is cut or torn, the person can lose a lot of blood within minutes • You can stop most bleeding with pressure • If the injured person can help you, ask them to put direct pressure on the wound while you put on your personal protective equipment (PPE)
    20. 20. Bleeding You can See
    21. 21. Bandaging • A bandage is material used to protect or cover an injured body part • A bandage may also help keep pressure on the wound
    22. 22. Burns • Burns are injuries that can be caused by contact with heat, electricity, or chemicals • Heat burns can be caused by contact with fire, a hot surface, a hot liquid, or steam • If someone with a burn gets too cold, they can get hypothermia
    23. 23. Burns Small burns Large burns
    24. 24. Electrical Injuries • Electricity can burn the body on the inside and outside • Electricity can stop breathing or cause a deadly abnormal heart rhythm • Electricity may leave only small marks on the body
    25. 25. Electrical Injuries
    26. 26. Environmental Emergencies
    27. 27. Bites and Stings • Usually insect and spider bites and stings cause only mild pain, itching, and swelling at the bite • Some insect bites can be serious and even fatal if: – The person bitten has a severe allergic reaction to the bite or sting – Poison is injected into the person
    28. 28. Bites and Stings
    29. 29. Heat Cramps • Most heat-related emergencies are caused by vigorous exercise • Heat cramps are painful muscle spasms, most often in the calves, arms, stomach muscles, and back • Signs of heat cramps include muscle cramps, sweating, and headache
    30. 30. Heat Cramps
    31. 31. Heat Exhaustion • Heat exhaustion is a serious condition that often turns into heat stroke • It often occurs when someone exercises in the heat and sweats a lot • Signs of heat exhaustion include sweating, nausea, dizziness, vomiting, muscle cramps, feeling faint, and fatigue
    32. 32. Heat Exhaustion
    33. 33. CPR and AED
    34. 34. New CPR Sequence
    35. 35. Compressions • A compression is the act of pushing on the chest • People often don’t push hard enough because they’re afraid of hurting the victim • An injury is unlikely, but it is better than death • It is better to push too hard than not hard enough
    36. 36. Compressions
    37. 37. Give Breaths • Compressions are the most important part of CPR • If you are also able to give breaths, you will help even more • Your breaths need to make the chest rise • When the chest rises, you know the person has taken in enough air
    38. 38. Open the Airway
    39. 39. Give Breaths
    40. 40. Use an AED • If you start CPR and then use an AED within a few minutes, you will have the best chance of saving a life • AEDs are safe, accurate, and easy to use
    41. 41. AED Programs – Why? • 294,000 cases of EMS-treated out-of- hospital sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) each year in the U.S. • Less than one-third receive bystander CPR; even fewer receive bystander defibrillation • Bystander CPR and time to defibrillation are key
    42. 42. Training Options
    43. 43. Heartsaver Courses Course Name eLearning Course Completion Time Classroom Course Completion Time Heartsaver First Aid 1 – 1 ½ hours online; up to 1 hour for skills session 2-3 hours Heartsaver CPR AED 30 minutes – 1 hour online; up to 1 hour for skills session 3-4 hours Heartsaver First Aid CPR AED 1 ½ - 2 ½ hours online; up to 1 hour for skills session 5-7 hours Heartsaver Bloodborne Pathogens 1 hour online; skills session not required 1 hour
    44. 44. Heartsaver eLearning Courses • Part 1, online • Parts 2 and 3, hands-on skills session • Saved time and money • Convenience • Flexibility • Consistency
    45. 45. Heartsaver Classroom Courses • Conducted in a classroom setting • Can be conducted onsite • Hands-on coaching and feedback • Group interaction
    46. 46. Training Options • HeartQuarters Training • Direct Links • PRO Package • Authorized AHA Training Centers
    47. 47. Resources • www.OnlineAHA.org • www.heart.org/heartquarters • www.heart.org/eccclassconnector • www.heart.org/instructor
    48. 48. Summary • According to OSHA, more than 3.3 million non-fatal injuries and illnesses occur in the workplace • First Aid, CPR, AED and Bloodborne Pathogens training is a “must do” in keeping your employees safe • eLearning is effective as classroom-based training
    49. 49. Questions?

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