Arul thirumurugan s<br />Social Interaction Model<br />
Models of Teaching: Definition and Meaning<br />Allen and Rayn(1969): Modeling is an individual demonstrating particular p...
Sources of Models of Teaching<br />The Information Processing Sources<br />The Social Interaction Sources<br />The Persona...
Social Interaction Model<br />Social Interaction Model stresses the relationship of the individual to the other persons an...
Social Interaction Model<br />Begins with an introduction lead by the instructor<br />The learners than break into groups<...
Steps to implementing Social Interaction<br />Introduction of concept by facilitator <br />Students group into teams. <br ...
Social Interaction and Technology<br />Internet<br />Video conferencing <br />Discussion boards<br />Chat rooms <br />E-ma...
Advantages<br />Student centred model that  engages a higher level of thinking<br />Promotes meaningful learning<br />Prom...
Disadvantages<br />The process of social interaction is time consuming<br />Its difficult to reach all content objectives<...
Different types of Social Interaction Models <br />Jurisprudential inquiry<br />Group investigation<br />Social inquiry<br...
Jurisprudential inquiry model<br />The chief exponents <br />Donald Olive & James P. Shaver<br />Goals : Designed primaril...
Jurisprudential Inquiry Model:How It Works<br />Debate Team Discussion Time (15 min.)<br />Introduction of a Topic by Deba...
THE GROUP-INVESTIGATION MODEL<br />The chief exponents<br />Herbert Thelem&John Dwey<br />Goals : Designed primarily<br />...
THE GROUP-INVESTIGATION MODELHow It Works<br />Students scan sources, propose questions, and sort them into categories. Th...
THE GROUP-INVESTIGATION MODELHow It Works<br />Pupils analyse and evaluate information obtained during Step 3.<br />Some o...
Social Inquiry<br />The chief exponents<br />ByrenMassialas&Benjamin Cox<br />Goals : Designed primarily<br />for the deve...
Social Inquiry<br />Description<br />engages exploration and reflection about authentic social problems, controversies, or...
Social InquiryHow It Works<br />General statement of a problem<br />Development of hypothesis<br />Definition of terms in ...
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Social interaction model

  1. 1. Arul thirumurugan s<br />Social Interaction Model<br />
  2. 2. Models of Teaching: Definition and Meaning<br />Allen and Rayn(1969): Modeling is an individual demonstrating particular pattern which the trainee learns through imitation.<br />B.K. Passi L.C. Singh and D.N. Sanasnwal(1991): A model of teaching consists of guidelines for designing educational activities and environments. Model of teaching is a plan that can also be utilized to shape courses of studies to design instructional material and to guide instruction<br />
  3. 3. Sources of Models of Teaching<br />The Information Processing Sources<br />The Social Interaction Sources<br />The Personal Sources<br />Behavior Modification as a Source<br />
  4. 4. Social Interaction Model<br />Social Interaction Model stresses the relationship of the individual to the other persons and to the society<br />Instructional methods used by teachers to facilitate group work<br />Student cantered teaching approaches that allows students to interact with each other in a structured on task manner<br />Normally face-to-face interaction<br />
  5. 5. Social Interaction Model<br />Begins with an introduction lead by the instructor<br />The learners than break into groups<br />The instructor continues to monitor and assess teams and their work<br />The teams conclude with their results/findings<br />
  6. 6. Steps to implementing Social Interaction<br />Introduction of concept by facilitator <br />Students group into teams. <br />Students negotiate, compromise, and explain concepts to another while facilitator monitors. <br />Students assess their work. <br />Students present findings.<br />
  7. 7. Social Interaction and Technology<br />Internet<br />Video conferencing <br />Discussion boards<br />Chat rooms <br />E-mail<br />Blogs<br />Website <br />
  8. 8. Advantages<br />Student centred model that engages a higher level of thinking<br />Promotes meaningful learning<br />Promotes leadership, team work and problem solving skills<br />More motivated when working together<br />Cooperative setting<br />
  9. 9. Disadvantages<br />The process of social interaction is time consuming<br />Its difficult to reach all content objectives<br />Group dynamics may also inhibit student learning<br />Some students may not participate<br />Differently abled students may find it difficult to participate<br />Instructors must consistently monitor group behaviour <br />
  10. 10. Different types of Social Interaction Models <br />Jurisprudential inquiry<br />Group investigation<br />Social inquiry<br />Laboratory method<br />Role playing<br />Social inquiry<br />Social stimulation<br />
  11. 11. Jurisprudential inquiry model<br />The chief exponents <br />Donald Olive & James P. Shaver<br />Goals : Designed primarily<br />to teach to thinking about and resolving social issues<br />to help students learn to think systematically about contemporary issues<br />to help students relearn/unlearn their positions on important legal, ethical, social, educational issues through intellectual debates.<br />
  12. 12. Jurisprudential Inquiry Model:How It Works<br />Debate Team Discussion Time (15 min.)<br />Introduction of a Topic by Debate Leader (10 min.)<br />Debate (60 min.)<br />Debriefing Time (30 min.)<br />Questions (20 min.)<br />
  13. 13. THE GROUP-INVESTIGATION MODEL<br />The chief exponents<br />Herbert Thelem&John Dwey<br />Goals : Designed primarily<br />for the development of skills for participation in democratic social process through combined emphasis on interpersonal skills and academic inquiry skills.<br />
  14. 14. THE GROUP-INVESTIGATION MODELHow It Works<br />Students scan sources, propose questions, and sort them into categories. The categories become subtopics. Students join the group(2-6) studying the subtopic of their choice.<br />Cooperative planning by students and instructor of specific learning procedures, tasks, and goals consistent with the subtopics.<br />Instructors closely follow the progress of each group and offer assistance when needed. Group members gather, organize, and analyse information from several sources. <br />
  15. 15. THE GROUP-INVESTIGATION MODELHow It Works<br />Pupils analyse and evaluate information obtained during Step 3.<br />Some or all of the groups in a class then give a presentation of the topic. The instructor coordinates the group presentations.<br />Evaluation by classroom peers and instructor of each group's contribution to the work of the class as a whole. Evaluation can include either individual or group assessment, or both. <br />
  16. 16. Social Inquiry<br />The chief exponents<br />ByrenMassialas&Benjamin Cox<br />Goals : Designed primarily<br />for the development of social problem solving primarily through academic inquiry and logical reasoning.<br />
  17. 17. Social Inquiry<br />Description<br />engages exploration and reflection about authentic social problems, controversies, or dilemmas, and which guides students through stages of inquiry and drawing conclusions about hypotheses related to the social issue.<br />The teacher generally is the initiator of inquiry and guides it from phase to phase in order to explore or solve a problem.<br />
  18. 18. Social InquiryHow It Works<br />General statement of a problem<br />Development of hypothesis<br />Definition of terms in the hypothesis<br />Examination and exploration of hypothesis for logical validity<br />Collecting evidences for verification of hypothesis<br />Generalization or statements about solution of the problem<br />
  19. 19. Thank you<br />
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