Information processing model file 1

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  • 1.
    • INFORMATION PROCESSING MODEL
    • V. Kamatchi
    • M.Ed. (2010-11)
    • School of Education
    • Pondicherry University
  • 2.
    • Meaning:
    • Information processing refers to the way people handle stimuli from environment, organize data, sense problems, generate concepts and solutions to problems and employ verbal and non-verbal symbols.
  • 3. Types of Information Processing Model
    • Concept Attainment model
    • Scientific Inquiry Method
    • Synectics model
    • Advance Organizer model
    • Inductive thinking
  • 4. CONCEPT ATTAINMENT MODEL (CAM)
    • J.S.Bruner, J.Goodrow and George Austine -- 1956.
    • Study of thinking process in human beings.
    • Capacity to discriminate and categorize things in groups.
    • To teach concepts to the students.
    • Understand the similarities and relationship
  • 5. Focus
    • Develops inductive reasoning.
    • Process of classifying things in groups.
    • Benefits us in 3 ways –
    • Reduces complexity
    • Identify objects
    • Reduces constant learning
  • 6. Syntax
    • Presentation of data
    • Analysis of hypothesis
    • Formation of hypothesis
    • Teacher reaction
    • Rejection or confirmation of hypothesis
    • Closure
    • Practice
  • 7. Principle of Reaction
    • Immediate check of wrong answers and acceptance of right answers is a must.
  • 8. Social System
    • The teaching situation is moderately structured.
    • The teacher has to control all actions of the class-room, but reasonable freedom is given for discussion within different phases of teaching.
    • Ensures co-operation
  • 9. Support System
    • The lessons require concepts which can be arranged so that concept may be drawn from the material
  • 10. Application
    • Concept attainment model is very useful in teaching the concepts through inductive reasoning.
    • Example: teaching Maths formula, grammar
  • 11. Merits
    • Natural way of teaching and learning.
    • Helpful in developing imagination power.
    • Development of reasoning power.
    • Analyze things systematically.
    • Students are actively engaged in the classroom activity.
    • It helps in making the student good observers.
    • It encourages the habit of self study in the students.
    • Apply their knowledge in different situations.
    • Busy classroom work.
  • 12. Limitations
    • It makes high demand on the students as well as teachers.
    • All the students of the class may not be able to participate in the teaching-learning process
    • Some students, on account of their shyness, fail to derive the requisite advantage of this model.
  • 13. Scientific Inquiry Model
    • It was built by J. Richard Suchman for developing scientific inquiry training skills in the students.
  • 14. Suchman Beliefs of this model
    • All knowledge is tentative.
    • There is no one particular answer to a problem.
    • Inquiry is natural.
    • Co-operative effort.
    • Analyze thinking strategies.
  • 15. Focus
    • Children are curious by nature and this model attempts to satisfy their urge of curiosity by providing systematic training in inquiry.
  • 16. Syntax
    • It consists of five phases:
    • Encounter with the problem
    • Data gathering process (verification)
    • Data gathering process (experimentation)
    • Formulating an explanation
    • Analysis of the enquiry process
  • 17. Principles of Reaction
    • Frame ‘yes’ or ‘no’ type questions.
    • Asking students to rephrase questions properly.
    • Pointing out unvalidated statements
    • Using the language of the inquiry process.
    • Provides free intellectual environment.
    • Makes clear statement of theories and supports for generalizations.
    • Encourages interaction among students.
  • 18. Social System
    • At every stage, the teacher is expected to respond in such a way as students may be encouraged to initiate and pursue the inquiry.
  • 19. Support System
    • Both the students and the teachers need additional support.
    • The teacher provides support to the student to develop material.
    • The teacher himself requires support on the problem.
  • 20. Application Context
    • Provides training to solve the problem in a systematic way.
    • As observed by Weil and Joyce the teacher cannot be too concerned with subject matter coverage or correctness.
  • 21. Merits
    • Develops imagination power.
    • Trains to analyze things systematically.
    • Develops reasoning power.
    • Trains students to put suitable questions.
    • Imparts training to go deep into the problem.
    • Prepares for solving problems of life systematically.
    • Demands continuous attention of the teacher as well as the students.
    • Students hardly can afford to be absent minded.
  • 22. Limitations
    • Works well only in the hands of very intelligent and resourceful teachers.
    • An average teacher can hardly make use of this model.
    • Shy students lag behind.
    • It puts a lot of premium on the speaking ability of the students.