Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
New York Times article discussing wiki use with PR students
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

New York Times article discussing wiki use with PR students

465
views

Published on

New York Times feature story discussing how I use wikis in the SMU classroom.

New York Times feature story discussing how I use wikis in the SMU classroom.

Published in: Education

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
465
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. HOME PAGE   TODAYS PAPER   VIDEO   MOST POPULAR   TIMES TOPICS   Subscribe to The Times Log In  Register Now  Help  Search All NYTimes.com Education    WORLD   U.S.   N.Y. / REGION   BUSINESS   TECHNOLOGY   SCIENCE   HEALTH   SPORTS   OPINION   ARTS   STYLE   TRAVEL   JOBS  REAL ESTATE  AUTOS  POLITICS EDUCATION BAY AREA CHICAGO TEXAS   Advertise on NYTimes.comEDUCATION  Advertise on NYTimes.comFor More Students, Working on Wikis Is Part of Making the Grade TimesLimited E­Mail By SONIA KOLESNIKOV ­JESSOP   Sign up to receive exclusive products and experiences Published: May 1, 2011   featuring NYTimes.coms premier advertisers.           SINGAPORE — As a university student, Avnish Desai was advised by  SIGN IN TO E ­ Privacy Policy MAIL  his professors to never rely on Wikipedia content alone for his  PRINT research. “In fact some discourage us from even using the Web site as a source of basic research,” he said.   REPRINTS     Now, as a fourth­year student in Related finance and corporate Executive M.B.A. Programs  communications at the Singapore Gain Popularity in India  (May 2,  2011)   Management University, Mr. Desai,  24, has been asked as part of a class assignment to help Some British Universities May Go Private  (May 2, 2011)    create his own wiki page on digital media in India.  Although wikis, with their collaborative approach and vast  The Fujifilm X100 is different  ALSO IN TECH » reach online, have been around for at least 15 years, their use as a general teaching tool in  Sonys first tablet  higher education is still relatively recent. But an increasing number of universities are now  The end of Friendster  adopting them as a teaching tool. As part of that trend, a handful of Singapore universities are using the wiki platform as a  ADVERTISEMENTS  way to engage students. Michael Netzley, assistant professor of corporate communication in the business school at the Singapore Management University, said students’ learning improved when they    embarked on wiki projects. “Rather than trying to read a textbook and regurgitate it for an exam, in order to write coherent segments, you have to actually intellectually understand it and be able to craft your own words, and that is a higher level of learning challenge,” he said. “All the research on learning theory suggests this is in fact a better way to learn.”    Mr. Netzley, whose students include Mr. Desai, started using wikis as a teaching tool in 2007. This semester, he asked the students in his Digital Media in Asia class to document the digital communication landscape of a given country, build a wiki page, and then conduct a one­week public relations campaign to promote it. “I am trying to simulate exactly what would happen if a P.R. agency takes on a new client in a new market and must start from scratch,” he said.  Working collaboratively, editing each other’s work publicly and getting feedback, sometimes from outside the classroom, can make many students uncomfortable at first . “It’s not something that we’re used to,” said Stuart Lee, an undergraduate who took Mr. Netzley’s class and helped create a wiki page on digital media in Japan. “We usually see the professor as the gatekeeper of information.”  Mr. Netzley acknowledged that during the past three years he had had to change the way he taught with wikis to accommodate his students’ concerns about sharing their incomplete work with others. “The notion of saving face really complicates the learning process,” he said, “because how do you learn if you’re not able to make mistakes and get feedback?”  To deal with that reluctance, he has let students keep their work on their own computers until they are confident in its quality and ready to publish it online. “When I started with this project, I did it from the point of view that the world is our stage,” Mr. Netzley said. “Students were publishing their wiki on the Web and immediately 
  • 2. do you learn if you’re not able to make mistakes and get feedback?”   To deal with that reluctance, he has let students keep their work on their own computers  until they are confident in its quality and ready to publish it online.  “When I started with this project, I did it from the point of view that the world is our  stage,” Mr. Netzley said. “Students were publishing their wiki on the Web and immediately  getting feedback. But it really didn’t work. The students’ feedback was quite clear; my  teaching evaluation went down!”   Mr. Netzley’s new approach, where the wikis are published for the marketing campaign  only after being completed, seems to have pleased the students.  Mr. Lee said: “The open wiki can be scary because you face the opportunity to be criticized  by a lot more people. But it’s also exhilarating. In this culture of instant gratification, it’s  amazing to be able to receive feedback on the spot by experts in the field.”   Misha Petrovic, an assistant professor of sociology at the National University of Singapore  who has been using wiki tools for five semesters, said he believed that using the wiki  format made the learning experience more dynamic. The approach encourages peer­to­ peer learning, rather than passive waiting for the instructor’s feedback, he said.   Mr. Petrovic, who has also taught in the United States and Europe, notes that in the  context of Asian culture, wikis can help students who tend to be less outspoken.  “Many here are often uncomfortable speaking in front of the class,”’ he said, “so dividing  them into wiki teams and allowing them to contribute from home and at their own pace  works great.”   Mr. Desai agreed, saying that the decentralization of the work was one of the advantages  of using wikis. Rather than have an entire study group meet up to work on a project, he  said, “all we needed to do was to go on to the wiki and edit the information ourselves.”   A version of this article appeared in print on May 2, 2011, in The  International Herald Tribune with the headline: For More Students,  Working on Wikis Is Part of Making the Grade. SIGN IN TO E ­ MAIL   PRINT  REPRINTS      Get 50% Off The New York Times & Free All Digital Access.   Get Free E­mail Alerts on These Topics  Education   Computers and the Internet   Wikipedia   INSIDE NYTIMES.COM     T MAGAZINE  »   OPINION »  N.Y. / REGION  »   MOVIES  »   TRAVEL  »   OPINION »   Op­Ed: When  Bad Things  Happen to Do­ Gooders Our unseemly delight at  the troubles of the  seemingly altruistic,            explained. Design and Living 2011 Father and Son, Bunking  Summer Movies In a Quiet Corner of  Op­Ed: Unsafe at Any  in G Block Italy ... Trieste Dose Home  World  U.S.  N.Y. / Region  Business  Technology  Science  Health  Sports  Opinion  Arts   Style  Travel  Jobs  Real Estate  Autos  Site Map    © 2011 The New York Times Company  Privacy  Your Ad Choices  Terms of Service  Terms of Sale  Corrections  RSS  Help  Contact Us  Work for Us  Advertise