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Communicative strategies for food benefits. Consumers, technologies and engagement.

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Professor Julie Barnett, Brunel University, London

Professor Julie Barnett, Brunel University, London

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  • Why do patterns of source citation change over time? Does this matter? (is it significant?) Do patterns of source citation vary systematically in relation to the nature of the risk issue? What are the main themes of the documents that don’t cite sources?

Communicative strategies for food benefits. Consumers, technologies and engagement. Presentation Transcript

  • 1. COMMUNICATING FOOD FOR HEALTH BENEFITS NEW FOOD TRENDS AND MEANINGS  PROFESSIONAL IDENTITIES AND FOOD COMMUNICATION  INNOVATIVE PRACTICES IN COMMUNICATION 8th – 9th November, 2012TARRAGONA Communicative strategies for food benefits: Consumers, technologies and engagement
  • 2. Julie BarnettProfessor of Health ResearchBrunel University, London, UKWithDr Afrodita Marcu, Dr Tim Cribbin, Phil Brooker (Brunel)Dr Rui Gaspar, Sara Gorjão , ISCTE, Lisbon, PortugalPieter Rutsaert, University of Ghent, Belgium
  • 3. Innovative Practices in Communication Vizzata Tweetvis Listening Technologies
  • 4. Vizzata: the principlesDeliberationQuestionsMaking sense of information
  • 5. EFSA Risk CommunicationGuidelines “Adjust and modify the communication programme in an organised effort to collect feedback and to sense changes in values and preferences” One of 4 general guidelines from EFSAs practical guidelines in risk communications document by EFSA http://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/corporate/pub/riskcommguidelines.htm
  • 6. What is Vizzata? An online tool for communicators to explore the reactions of the public to prompt material Provide bite size chunks of content – text, video, images Elicit the questions and comments that participants have Measures attentiveness to information Enables on-going engagement with participants
  • 7. What does Vizzata do?  Introduce unfamiliar issues in an engaging way  Identify areas of concern, uncertainty, scepticism and misunderstanding  Explore differences between groups e.g. countries, gender, familiarity with the issue  Discover what people want more information about
  • 8. Participants’ questions and comments UK BE PT TotalsParticipants 51 63 60 174 *leaving questions/comments 63% 43% 62% 55%Total number of questions and comments 155 164 136 455 *requiring answers 75% 72% 81% 76%Number of questions 48 56 55 159 *requiring answers 79% 71% 81% 77%Number of comments 107 108 81 296 *requiring answers 74% 73% 81% 75%
  • 9. Questions and comments per information page
  • 10. To assist risk communicators in engagingwith public and stakeholder communitiesin an appropriate, effective and costeffective manner
  • 11. What is Vizzata?
  • 12. Social Media Internet-based applications and platforms that allows users to create and exchange content Interactive, dynamic, collaborative User-generated content. Multi-directional communication flows
  • 13. The rise in social networking sites An overview study of the Internet in Britain organised by the Oxford Internet Institute every two years since 2003 “How often do you use the Internet for the following purposes?” Source: Oxford Internet Survey (2011, p. 34)
  • 14. Microblogging and  Microblogging sending brief updates to large audiences via the web or mobile devices.  Twitter is the largest microblogging service with 500 million users since 2006.  Conversational elements such as the “@” symbol as a form of address, RT for retweeting and # hashtags.  Twitter during emergency events, e.g. August 2011 riots in England
  • 15. Social media & risk communication An
  • 16. Twitter and risk communication Evaluating metrics  Mentions  Retweets  Followers Sending fast  Click throughs topical alerts Pointing users to online content “Search Twitter for comments Disseminating about your organisation or original message health topic: You can use search.twitter.com to monitor Twitter. You can then ‘listen’ to conversations about important health concerns, find messages about your organisation and monitor how audiences are responding to messages” CDC,
  • 17. Twitter and risk communication “The internet has become an established forum for interactive debate and discussion about the causes and consequences of hazards… citizens increasingly play an active role in collecting, reporting and analysing news information” 1Mythen, G. (2010). "Reframing risk? Citizen journalism and the transformation of news." Journal of Risk Research 13(1): 45-58.
  • 18. What is the value of the information that Twitter gives? Gives you more information? Gives you better information? Gives you different information? Gives more precise information? Gives you the same information more easily? Gives you the same information economically?
  • 19. Social media content asdataAnalysis of comments on BBC news story about bird flu as data 1Using Amazon product reviews as data 2Use of search terms for predicting incidence or the location of influenza outbreaks1 Rowe, G., G. Hawkes, et al. (2008). "Initial UK public reaction to avian influenza: Analysis of opinions posted on the BBC website." Health Risk & Society 10(4): 361-3842 Money, A., J. Barnett, et al. (2011). "Public Claims about Automatic External Defibrillators: An Online Consumer Opinions Study." BMC Public Health 11(1): 332.
  • 20. TWEETVIS: text miningand data visualisation toolo Depicts the frequency distribution of tweets, selected on key words, over specified time period within chosen time intervalso Shows profile of source citations in each periodo Can be layered against key known risk ‘events’o Depicts the novelty profile o Changes in term use since preceding time interval o Terms that discriminate one interval from all intervalso Sentiment analysis – using SentiStrengtho Visual depiction of how common term occurrence is over time
  • 21. Rise and fall of cucumber SPANISH CUCUMBERS TESTED + FOR EHEC EHEC STRAIN NOT FOUND ON SPANISH CUCUMBERS LINK BETWEEN EHEC AND SPROUTS STRENGTHENS LINK WITH BEAN SPROUTS AND ORGANIC FARM IN HAMBURG FSA ADVISES NOT TO EAT RAW BEAN SPROUTS BEAN SPROUTS IDENTIFIED AS LIKELY EHEC CAUSE DRIED FENUGREEK SEEDS IDENTIFIED AS THE LIKELY CAUSE OF ECOLI OUTBREAK
  • 22. Information sources cited SPANISH CUCUMBERS TESTED + FOR EHEC LINK WITH BEAN SPROUTS AND ORGANIC FARM IN HAMBURG EHEC STRAIN NOT FOUND ON SPANISH CUCUMBERS • How
  • 23. The FoodRisC project is developing tools to assist riskcommunicators with their listening enterprisesVizzata is a method to engage relevant publics in deliberationto understand attentiveness, values, concerns and questionsto inform or contribute to decision making processesTweetVis enables communicators to analyse and visualise Twitterdatamoves beyond basic social media evaluation methodsinteractive representations of datamapping changing profiles of data over time
  • 24. Please contact the project team if you would like anyfurther information about either of thesecommunication toolsWe are seeking risk communicators to partner us inresearch and communication enterprises using bothVizzata and TweetVis Thank you for listening! Any questions? Julie.Barnett@brunel.ac.uk