Portuguese dance

  • 1,813 views
Uploaded on

 

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
1,813
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3

Actions

Shares
Downloads
19
Comments
0
Likes
1

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Portuguese dances and traditional costumes School Artur Gonçalves Work done by: Rafael Marques; Rita Marques;
  • 2. IndexPage 3…………………………………………………………………………………. “Vira do Minho”Page 4………………………………………………..……..………….... How do they dance: “Vira”?Page5………………………....……………..………… Traditional dances of Trás-os-MontesPage 6……….………………………………………….. Traditional dances of Trás-os-MontesPage 7……………………………………………………….…. The costumes ofTrás-os-MontesPage 8…………………………………………………….……………… “Os Pauliteiros de Miranda”Page 9……………………………………………………………………………………… how to dance?Page 10…………………………………………………………………………………….………. “Chulas”Page 11………………………………………………………………….…………………………… MalhãoPage 12……………………………...………………………. Danças Tradicionais da Beira AltaPage 13………………………………………………………………………………………. EstremaduraPage 14……………………………………………………..………………………… Principais DançasPage 15………………………………………………………….…………………………………. RibatejoPage 16…………………………………………………….………………………… Trajes do RibatejoPage 17……………………………………………………………………………………… Alto AlentejoPage 18……………………………...………………………………….……………….. Baixo AlentejoPage 19……………………………………………………………………….……… Trajes do AlentejoPage 20……………………………………………………………………………………………..… AlgarvePage 21……………………………………………………………………………….… Trajes do AlgarvePage 22………………………………………………….……………………… “Bailinho da Madeira”Page 23………………………………………………………………………………………..……… “BrincoPage 24………………………………………………..………….. Danças Tradicionais dos AçoresPage 25…………………………………………………………………………...Bibliografia/webgrafia
  • 3. Minho “Vira do Minho”“O Vira” is a musical-choreographic genre Portuguese folklore.Best known as characteristic of Minho, “o Vira” is also danced inmany other provinces, including Estremadura 3
  • 4. Is the most important dance of Alto Minho. The facts of Minho helpcomplete the picture. Be in wheel pairs, show of hands, are turningslowly in the opposite direction the hands of the clock. Men go forwardand women retreating. The situation dragged on until the voice of adancer is required, screaming “fora” ou “virou”. They turned around onthe inside and placed face-to-face with the girl that came later. Thismove will be happening until all exchange pair, while thewheel rotates in the same sense. 4
  • 5. Trás-os-Montes● Murinheira is one of the most typical dances trasmontanas (as “oPasseado” and the “Carvalhesa”). Is accompanied by gaita de foles,pandeireta and ferrinhos.● Galandum it’s a song accompanied of tamboril, bagpipes,flute,tambourines, castanets, shells («carracas»), triangle and whistle. 5
  • 6. ● Carvalhesa is a dance composed of four figures, accompaniedby bagpipes and triangle.● Redondo is a dance, performed alternately and is used the bagpipes. Bagpipes (transmontana) 6
  • 7. Costumes of Trás-os- MontesFarm brown coat. Black apron embroideredwith bright colors.Handkerchief course. Great whitecollar. Shoes uploaded. In the neck, black velvetribbon.The mens costumes are: to the head - hat orcap. To the top of the stem are:jacket, also said half; vest, sweater and shirt; tobottom are: pants. For the feet is: shoes andboots, when pipes are high; 7
  • 8. “Os pauliteiros de Miranda” On the plateau mirandês there are groups of eight men whowear skirts and have sticks. They are “pauliteiros de Miranda”.With white skirts, scarves, hats, “Pauliteiros” carry the tradition whoseek to defend. And although many groups no longer exist as in thepast, letters, steps and costumes are still faithful to the source. 8
  • 9. How to dance? In this dance the stick left hand and righthand defends attacks. As for the costume, the scarf isnot more than an ornament, very gaudy, which varieswith the man who uses it, and with regard to the skirt, eventoday, when it comes time to “dança da velha", habit typicalof January 1 in Vila Chã, where men dress as women andgo to the street. 9
  • 10. “Chulas”Chula, a dance that runs along the banks of the Douroand Minho extends to. Draws for the courts of thechurches, those who like to dance and when Christmascomes around, this opportunity to celebrate with some‘chulas’The dance begins when the couple arranged in a circle, turninward. After going dancing passo de chula’, and the chief to order,here we are starting a "voltear. It runs in five minutes, duringwhich the couple take turns on each other in larger steps. At theend of this movement comes the characteristic ‘pulo’ a ‘pé-coxinho’ 10
  • 11. “Malhão”The name "Malhão" probably had its origin in some agricultural instrument and thetime when it was danced in the villages, had a different choreography, women andmen had lined up, facing each other. Would be closer and moving away and hit successively pace with the feet. The end of all dance happened when closing the wheel and jumped. 11
  • 12. Beira AltaMost of the dances of the Beira Alta are "dancing circle", either inpairs or hand in hand :a Carqueijinha, o Cravo Roxo, a Carolina, a Pastorinha,o Ó Redondo,o Ó Redondinha, a Lavadeira, a Laranja da China, o Bate asPalmas, a Dobadoira, o Mulato da China, o Ai quem me Acode, are one ofthe huge dance that is danced in this area. In the region are still dances with complicated choreography: a Farrapeira(What is a ‘chula’), a Retaxeira, o Tareio, a Moda do Indo Eu (which is ajoke or game ballet) and as theatrical, Frade Capucho. 12
  • 13. EstremaduraExtremadura although to be located in Lisbon, thecapital, which in some way,influence allthis province, yet their music and theirdances have very archaicaspects and decidedly rural,together with, in certain areas, the influences areevident either of Beira Litoral want Ribatejo. 13
  • 14. Main dancesThe main dances are: a Ramaldeira, a Ramadeira, o Enleio, aCarreirinha, o Chicote, os Reinadios, alguns Viras (of Beira Litoral),algumas Saias (of Alto Alentejo), o Verde-Gaio, a Ciranda, a Xotiça, oPasso-a-Quatro, a Machadinha, o Fandango e o Bailarico thatalthough ballet across Extremadura, has its best expression inthe region of origin. 14
  • 15. RibatejoThe dances and songs of the Ribatejo region of the district are particularlyenriched with artistic details, restful, elegant and harmonious.Their costumes are sober as indeed is the very picture of the area wherethey live. The costumes of women are of various colors,but predominantly for discrete tones. Skirts can be blue, black, green andbrown. As for the sweaters are clearer and more vivid colors of aprons andheadscarvesbit gaudy.As to the manner of man the most important is "Ceremony" or "Sundaybest", and consisting entirely black pants, with pockets rights, blackvest, white shirt and bibheels shelf. 15
  • 16. Costumes of RibatejoWhen we walk along the Ribatejo province, turns out some differencesin the way of dancing and dress . To the north, on the right bank ofthe Tejo River, are the neighborhoods, wherethe herdsmen use darker costumes and dances are slower; south-guess now mounted the heath, but in thegreat flatlands that ’campino’ wears clothes more garish and dance ina more agitated. Here we find them withthe gray coveralls and hat band and incarnate. 16
  • 17. Alto AlentejoAlto Alentejo, perhaps the poorest and leastoriginal choreographic region of the country but musical-mind one of the richest,o Alto Alentejo, has, in the districtof Portalegre, one of the finest Portuguese folkdances and features: as Saias. Alongsidethese, the Alentejo is still dances: o Salto em Bico, osBailhos Campaniços, Balhos de Roda, o Puladinho, os Balhosde Cadeia, o Fandango and even o Vira. 17
  • 18. Baixo Alentejo‘Balhos de Cadeia and Balhos de Roda’ are the main types ofchoreography in this province, something poor so full ofdancingand choral music. Yet even faced with some other flavor dances andpractice locations: o Marcadinho, o Puladinho, o Tope, a Redondinha, oChegadinho e as Seguidilhas.It has long disappeared some "religious dances" that wereonce danced in the Alentejo where, however, olderpeople still remember the Maquinéu, the Pinhões, the Fandango and theEscalhavardos. 18
  • 19. Costumes of AlentejoTraje da Ceifeira: The clothing is made harvesters by two factsclothing field- composed of high boots, thicksocks black skirts shorts (its a skirt, this then to the knees withsome strings that are called "orelos" and between the legs foldup with pins) an old shirt, black hat called a ”aguadeiro” inwinter, summer straw hats, a scarf with black stripes andwhite. Its actually working.Roupa de Portas– consisting of a skirt, a blouse, and farm inwinter. The summer blouse has a frillsquare, the apronwas embroidered by machine, or frill underneath, darkblue scarfof silk. It is the fact that the harvesters dressed afterwork in the fields. 19
  • 20. Algarve Although Corridinho the Balls and Warrants Balls Wheels are the mostcharacteristic dances and practiced in the Algarve, the Algarve there are manyother local dances or popularized (but that the Algarve has printed the strongstamp of his character) still in use : the Balso Marcado or BalsoRasteiro ,the Regadinho, the Balso Pulado, the Contradança and the Bailarico.In the category of balls wheel there are many dances, such as thefamous AuntAnica Loulé, the Almond, the Pound, the Papelinho andmany more. 20
  • 21. Trajes do AlgarveThe day-to-day, the woman wears a headscarf, a cottoncloth, which tightens the front. The blouse in shades of blue. Simple cut, open infront and long sleeves withcuffs. Fabric Cotton Skirt £ creating the blue stripes, thelower end has a frill of the same fabric. The apron iscotton fabric blue print, forming floral patterns,having the lower extremity veins and frill of the samefabric. 21
  • 22. Madeira “Bailinho da Madeira”In a sense weveall seen dancing "Bailinho Madeira" or atleast, as he is known on the continent: a group,dressed in the costume of the island offlowers, dancing around the regionalinstrument typical of Madeira: the brinquinho. Itis an instrument made by a group of ragdolls and seven regional dress with castanetsand ’fitilhos’ arranged at the end of uma ’canade roca’ and excited by vertical movements of thehand of the bearer, this is the bailinho! 22
  • 23. “Brinco”However there is another, it appears that the bailinho typical camp in the island, where the challenge of singing and dance choreography invented at the time. In thisfun gives the name of earring. It is sung and danced by all, without rule orrestriction. It is not necessary to dress as simply wanting to enter the wheel. (Island of Madeira) 23
  • 24. AçoresLike all the other popular dances Azores is cheerfuland lively, and characteristics of ingenuity. ’Pézinho’ is the mostpopular folk dance gaucho, or Brazilian folklore, playedby Azorean immigrants in Brazil. Where the dancers havetwo parts: the first there is a marking of the feet and thesecond pairs revolve around them selves,taken by the arm (Ilha dos Açores) 24
  • 25. Bibliografia/webgrafiahttp://www.folclore-online.comhttp://www.os camponeses.comhttp://www.wikipedia.comEnciclopédia do Folclore PortuguêsLivro III e IV Congresso de Folclore do Ribatejo 25