Dual BA Program Between Columbia University and Sciences Po
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Dual BA Program Between Columbia University and Sciences Po

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Find out more about the Dual BA Program Between Columbia University and Sciences Po, which offers a select group of highly qualified students the chance to study for two years in France at Sciences Po ...

Find out more about the Dual BA Program Between Columbia University and Sciences Po, which offers a select group of highly qualified students the chance to study for two years in France at Sciences Po and two years in New York City at Columbia while earning two bachelor’s degrees, one from each institution.

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  • - The Dual BA Program Between Columbia University and Sciences Po is a joint partnership between two elite educational institutions where students within the program are fully-fledged members of both university communities for all four years, regardless of whether they are in France or in New York. This program, in effect, turns the traditional junior year abroad on its head, and gives its students a broad base of knowledge in the social sciences at Sciences Po in their first two years, then returns them to Columbia for their Junior and Senior years to choose from one of over 70 undergraduate liberal arts majors. Students within the Dual BA Program are completely integrated into the undergraduate student body on both sides of the Atlantic, sharing the classroom with all of their peers both at Sciences Po and Columbia. This is a program that really speaks to the positive side of globalization, helping its students to truly embrace their roles as citizens of our increasingly shrinking world.
  • I would like to share a little history about both Columbia University and Sciences Po, starting with Columbia. King’s College, as Columbia was originally known, was founded in 1754 – It is the oldest college in New York State and fifth oldest in the United States overall. After the end of the Revolutionary War in 1786, the name was changed to Columbia College to honor Christopher Columbus and to celebrate the birth of the new nation. After the end of the Civil War in 1864, the College began adding on programs at the graduate level, and became Columbia University. How many people here have ever visited the Columbia University campus? And how many have been to New York City before? For those of you who have been to campus previously, you know that we are located in the Morningside Heights neighborhood in northern Manhattan, but Columbia was originally located at the bottom of Manhattan, where Trinity Church is now, very close to Wall Street and the World Trade Center site. In the mid-1800’s, Columbia moved from Lower Manhattan, to the Rockefeller Center area, where it remained for the next forty years. Finally, in 1897, University President Seth Low, for whom the iconic Low Library is named, moved the university to our current home in Morningside Heights. The Columbia campus was designed to be an urban academic village. In 2004, the university celebrated its 250th anniversary and is today know as one of the world’s leading research centers, with a diverse and widely known roster of alumni.
  • One thing that sets Columbia University apart from other Ivy League Schools is the way our undergraduate schools are constructed. There are four undergraduate colleges at Columbia, and each serve a different population of students. While they are completely academically integrated, administratively, each of the four schools operate separately to better serve each of their own students’ needs.
  • The four undergraduate schools at Columbia, as you can see here are: Columbia College, the School of General Studies, the Fu Foundation – School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, and Barnard College. Columbia College is the undergraduate school at the university that offers a liberal arts education to students following a traditional four year undergraduate path. This is usually the school that people think of when considering applying to Columbia University as an undergraduate student while they are in their senior year of high school.The School of General Studies, on the other hand, is the undergraduate school at the university that offers a liberal arts undergraduate experience for students following a nontraditional educational path. This includes students within the Dual BA Program.The Fu Foundation is the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. For students looking to study any kind of engineering or applied mathematics or physics, the Fu Foundation is the school to which you would apply at Columbia.Finally, Barnard College is technically an affiliate of Columbia University, and is a liberal arts college for women following a traditional four-year undergraduate path. Barnard was founded at a time when the Ivy League was still open to only men and was, at the time, the sister school to Columbia College, where women could receive the same liberal arts education available to men. When Columbia College went-co-ed in the early 1980’s, Barnard decided to maintain a separate identity and continue in their mission to offer a rigorous liberal arts education to young women.
  • I’d like to take a few minutes to talk a little bit more about the School of General Studies, as GS is the school that houses all of the nontraditional undergraduate student programs at Columbia. We define a nontraditional student, unsurprisingly, in many different ways. At GS, nontraditional students include: students who have taken a break from their education or who must attend classes part-time for one reason or another, students completing a second bachelor’s degree and students enrolled in a dual or joint BA program. By virtue of the fact that students within the Dual BA program will be completing two bachelors degrees in the time it takes most students to complete one, this makes them nontraditional students. At GS we also have a Joint BA Program with List College, at the Jewish Theological Seminary where students are enrolled concurrently at both institutions, again, earning two degrees in four years. As I mentioned before, each school at Columbia is administratively separate, which means that we all have our own admissions, financial aid and advising offices, but students within all four undergraduate schools take all of their courses together, so there are no classes that are only for CC students or only for GS students. Does anyone have any questions about the School of General Studies before we move on?
  • Now for some background on Sciences Po. Before hearing about this program, who had heard of Sciences Po previously? OK, well Sciences Po was originally founded in 1872 after the end of the Napoleonic Wars by Emile Boutmy, who was a French political scientist and sociologist. Boutmy saw a need for a forum for training the next generation of French political leaders and founded L’EcoleLibre des Sciences Politiques to address this need. You can see how the modern nickname, Sciences Po is shortened from the phrase Sciences Politiques. After the end of WWII, Charles de Gaulle incorporated Sciences Po into the French public university system, adding it to the roster of the GrandesEcoles, and changing the name to L’instituted’EtudesPolitiques de Paris. The nicknameToday, Sciences Po is known throughout France and Europe on the whole as an institution that offers the highest level of training in the social sciences. Sciences Po counts among its alumni the three most recent French Presidents, 10 of the last 18 Prime Ministers, Former UN Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali, who also studied at Columbia as a Fulbright Scholar, and the heads of dozens of leading French businesses such as SocietéGénerale, Carrefour and Air France.
  • While at Sciences Po, students will take classes in seven core areas: Economics, History, Law, International Relations, Political Science, Sociology and foreign languages. The courses a student takes while at Sciences Po during their first two years are treated as transfer credit once they arrive back to Columbia.  These courses are generally able to fulfill the majority of a student’s Columbia Core requirements, which is how the program is able to be completed in four years. Each semester, students study together in three core courses that are taught lecture style, while the rest of their courses are more seminar-style classes that are broken out into smaller groups.
  • While at Sciences Po, students will take classes in seven core areas: Economics, History, Law, International Relations, Political Science, Sociology and foreign languages. The courses a student takes while at Sciences Po during their first two years are treated as transfer credit once they arrive back to Columbia.  These courses are generally able to fulfill the majority of a student’s Columbia Core requirements, which is how the program is able to be completed in four years. Each semester, students study together in three core courses that are taught lecture style, while the rest of their courses are more seminar-style classes that are broken out into smaller groups.
  • In the last ten to twelve years, Sciences Po launched six regional campuses as part of their undergraduate program in locations all over France, in addition to their flagship campus in Paris. These campuses each have their own distinct culture and flavor, because each campus takes their academic focus from a different geographic and cultural region of the world. What this means is that, depending on the Sciences Po campus at which you are studying, the Sciences Po courses I discussed a moment ago will turn an eye toward that campus’ region of focus. I will go into more detail about the three campuses that are part of the Dual BA Program in a moment, but a few general things to know are that each of the Sciences Po regional campuses are very small and closely knit. There are fewer than 300 students on each of these campuses, but, of those 300 students, half of them will hail from the region of focus and half will come from France or other international locations. The reason that the Dual BA Program is only available on three of the seven campuses is because the Le Havre, Menton and Reims campuses all offer their coursework on an English language track, as well as the French language track. This means that, while students must take classes in French if they are not already fluent, proficiency in French is NOT a prerequisite for admission to the Dual BA Program, so if you are a student who is not fluent in French, you are still eligible for admission to the program.
  • One thing that sets Columbia University apart from other Ivy League Schools is the way our undergraduate schools are constructed. There are four undergraduate colleges at Columbia, and each serve a different population of students. While they are completely academically integrated, administratively, each of the four schools operate separately to better serve each of their own students’ needs.
  • One thing that sets Columbia University apart from other Ivy League Schools is the way our undergraduate schools are constructed. There are four undergraduate colleges at Columbia, and each serve a different population of students. While they are completely academically integrated, administratively, each of the four schools operate separately to better serve each of their own students’ needs.
  • One thing that sets Columbia University apart from other Ivy League Schools is the way our undergraduate schools are constructed. There are four undergraduate colleges at Columbia, and each serve a different population of students. While they are completely academically integrated, administratively, each of the four schools operate separately to better serve each of their own students’ needs.
  • One thing that sets Columbia University apart from other Ivy League Schools is the way our undergraduate schools are constructed. There are four undergraduate colleges at Columbia, and each serve a different population of students. While they are completely academically integrated, administratively, each of the four schools operate separately to better serve each of their own students’ needs.
  • One thing that sets Columbia University apart from other Ivy League Schools is the way our undergraduate schools are constructed. There are four undergraduate colleges at Columbia, and each serve a different population of students. While they are completely academically integrated, administratively, each of the four schools operate separately to better serve each of their own students’ needs.
  • One thing that sets Columbia University apart from other Ivy League Schools is the way our undergraduate schools are constructed. There are four undergraduate colleges at Columbia, and each serve a different population of students. While they are completely academically integrated, administratively, each of the four schools operate separately to better serve each of their own students’ needs.
  • One thing that sets Columbia University apart from other Ivy League Schools is the way our undergraduate schools are constructed. There are four undergraduate colleges at Columbia, and each serve a different population of students. While they are completely academically integrated, administratively, each of the four schools operate separately to better serve each of their own students’ needs.
  • One thing that sets Columbia University apart from other Ivy League Schools is the way our undergraduate schools are constructed. There are four undergraduate colleges at Columbia, and each serve a different population of students. While they are completely academically integrated, administratively, each of the four schools operate separately to better serve each of their own students’ needs.
  • One thing that sets Columbia University apart from other Ivy League Schools is the way our undergraduate schools are constructed. There are four undergraduate colleges at Columbia, and each serve a different population of students. While they are completely academically integrated, administratively, each of the four schools operate separately to better serve each of their own students’ needs.
  • Once students have completed their first two years on campus at Sciences Po, they then come back to the US for years three and four at Columbia. As I mentioned before, the majority of their core coursework will be completed at Sciences Po, but there will be a few classes such as natural sciences, college writing, literature, and art and music humanities, that they will need to take at Columbia before starting on their major. Students may also need to take some prerequisites, depending on their major at Columbia.
  • Speaking of majors, Columbia offers over 70 liberal arts majors, all of which are open to students in the Dual BA Program. One thing that I do want to mention is that, for students thinking about pursuing a major well outside the area of the social sciences, or for majors that require more than 40 credits to complete, a student may need to take summer courses or spend an additional semester at Columbia – this would most likely be the case for a major in something like the natural sciences, as those courses are not offered at all at Sciences Po. We definitely recommend that students take a look at our website and take note of how many credits the major they intend to pursue requires. This doesn’t mean that you can’t be a biology major or an astrophysicist, but it might take a few more classes to get you there. Does anyone have any questions about the academics of the Dual BA Program?
  • – Student life at each of the Dual BA campuses is as varied as the campuses themselves. The campus directors and deputy directors are all truly fantastic administrators who are extremely responsive to the needs of their students – one of the benefits of having such a small student body at each campus. The directors of each campus act as the academic advisors for their students, and each have an open-door policy if students need anything outside of the classroom during the academic year. In addition to having open access to the administration while at Sciences Po, students within the program will also be able to communicate with their Columbia academic advisor during their first two years in France. My colleague Kay, who is the academic advisor for all Dual BA Program students, visited each of the campuses in France with me and a few other colleagues back in September and met with her advisees individually to discuss the courses they are taking, the major they intend to pursue at Columbia, electives they may want to consider in their second semester and second year, etc. We want students within this program to truly feel as though they are fully part of both universities for all four years, and to know that they have the support of both institutions behind them.
  • For a little more information on the campus life at Sciences Po, as I already mentioned, the student bodies of each campus are all quite small, but that doesn’t mean they are lacking in student life at all. Each campus has its own Student Association, Cultural Organizations and Sports Associations. In Le Havre and Menton, there is a sailing team for each campus, as they are both on the ocean. In addition, students who want to take part in sports that are not organized on campus at Sciences Po are usually welcome to join the clubs or leagues of their city or in conjunction with another university in the immediate area. Sports that are offered are usually soccer, basketball, rugby, swimming, etc. Finally, the cultural organizations at each campus are very active in organizing outings around France or into other countries in Europe. At Menton and Reims especially, students are quite close to the borders of Italy in the case of Menton and Belgium and Luxembourg in the case of Reims, so it’s very easy to take a weekend and explore other parts of weekend when you’re not studying. And even though you will be working hard at your studies, each of these three cities are really hubs of regional activity. Menton, in addition to being close to Italy and Monaco, is obviously very close to Nice. Reims and Le Havre are both accessible to Paris by train. Reims is on the TGV line that takes only one hour to bring you to Paris, and Le Havre is getting TGV service next year, which will also make it an hour’s travel from Paris.I also want to take a moment to talk about housing at Sciences Po. Most French universities do not offer dormitory-style housing, though in Reims there is a dorm, but in all three cases, the most plentiful type of housing are student apartments available through a French government agency called CROUS, which organizes student lodging in any cities that have a sizeable university presence. These apartments can be either single-occupancy or shared, and rent usually ranges from E300-400 per month. In addition, students can apply to the French Government for something called CAF, which stands for Caissed'AllocationsFamiliales. The CAF is basically a stipend that helps students cover part of their costs of living and usually ranges from E100-200 per month. Any questions about student life at Sciences Po?
  • On the Columbia side, when students return to the US, you are joining a much larger student body! Columbia has approximately 24,000 students on campus, a third of whom are undergraduates. We have over 250 clubs that cover pretty much every interest you can imagine. If you want an activity on campus that is not currently offered by a club or organization, you can start a club pretty easily, as well. We are part of NCAA athletics, if you are interested in playing a sport during your time at Columbia. But one of the most important things about campus life at Columbia is the fact that we are on an urban campus, in the middle of all that New York City has to offer – the #1 subway line stops right outside of campus at 116th Street and Broadway. Professors at Columbia definitely use the city as part of the campus as well – art history classes take advantage of the fact that we have the Metropolitan Museum of Art just on the other side of Central Park, your music humanities class may involve a trip to Lincoln Center to hear the New York Phil or to a Broadway show and anything else that, for whatever reason, you don’t find on campus is guaranteed to be found within a five-mile radius of campus.Similar to the housing at Sciences Po, the housing accommodations at Columbia are also student apartments. These are less often single-occupancy arrangements and more often shares within a 5-10 minute walk from campus. Apartments usually range in price from $750-1200 per month depending on the size of campus, number of roommates you have, whether the apartment is furnished or unfurnished, etc. As students begin to arrive on campus, our goal is to keep students from the Dual BA Program housed together to keep a sense of community within the program. However, if you have family or friends in New York and you plan to live with them, that is absolutely an option as well. There is no requirement to live on campus if you don’t want to.
  • Something very important to know about this program, and about Sciences Po in general, is that students who complete a Sciences Po undergraduate degree, whether through the Dual BA Program or Sciences Po’s traditional program are guaranteed admission to one of Sciences Po’s Masters programs in Paris. Sciences Po has 16 different Masters programs that cover the full range of social and political sciences: Economics, International Affairs, Public Policy, Urbanism, Communications, etc. Enrolling in one of these programs after completing the Dual BA Program is simply a matter of filling out a form an arriving in September in Paris. In addition, while in the program and after graduation, students will have access to both the Sciences Po and Columbia career service centers. If you are looking for a summer internship or study program, you will be able to use the resources from both universities to find the right one for you, and both Sciences Po and Columbia students are very highly sought-after by organizations in both the public and private sectors as they near graduation. Finally, you will be part of both global alumni networks, part of the same group as Presidents Sarkozy and Obama, Boutros Boutros-Ghali and Jacques Pepin. Any questions about student life or housing at Columbia?
  • – Now for the information you’ve all been waiting for – the application process. The application for the Dual BA Program is a standalone application, separate from the Common App, and is found on our website, which is listed in your brochure and at the end of our slideshow. It is very important to know that it is not possible to apply for admission to both the Dual BA Program and Columbia College, you do have to choose to apply to one program or the other, so that is something to bear in mind as you decide whether this program is right for you. Once you do decide that the Dual BA Program is right for you, you will need to submit your high school transcripts and standardized test scores, as well as any international graduation exams such as the French Baccalaureat, German Abitur or British O or A Levels.
  • In addition to your transcripts and test scores, we also require two letters of recommendation, which can either be sent via post or uploaded by your recommenders through the application online. There are two essays that we need from you, one autobiographical essay discussing why the Dual BA Program is right for you, and one asking you to reflect on a challenge from your own life, how you overcame that challenge and how you feel the Dual BA Program will prepare you to face similar challenges in the future. Applicants who are considered to be strong candidates for admission to the program will be contacted to schedule interviews with members of the admissions committee in early March.
  • When the admissions committee reads an application, we take a lot of different factors into account. In looking at your transcripts and test scores, we want to see that you are academically ready for a very rigorous program – I won’t lie to you, this is going to be a lot of work, so we want to see from your past grades that you’re up to the challenge. We also want to know whether you are a good fit for the program. For this we look at your own essays and your letters of recommendation to understand what your motivation for studying the social sciences is, what you’re thinking about majoring in at Columbia, what your preference for campus placement is at Sciences Po, and how all three of those factors work together and influence one another. Decisions will be made and sent out to all applicants by April 1st, and we’ll ask that you let us know what your plans are for the fall by May 1st.
  • Tuition and fees for the Dual BA Program are variable based on whether a student is currently in France or here at Columbia. While students are on campus at Sciences Po, they pay Sciences Po tuition which, for students who are not French citizens, is E9,300 per academic year. This converts to approximately $13,000. In years three and four here at Columbia, students pay Columbia tuition, which is approximately $45,000 per academic year. These estimates do not include rent or other living expenses, but it does mean that, averaged out over the course of the four years, the Dual BA program ends up costing far less than a four-year Columbia undergraduate degree.
  • Financial Aid is available for all four years of the Dual BA Program. While Sciences Po, being a French university, is not able to administer Federal financial aid such as Direct Loans, Perkins Loans, Pell Grants and Work Study, students within the Dual BA Program are able to apply for the Emile Boutmy Scholarship and awards for the Boutmy scholarship can range from a small percentage up to full tuition remission at Sciences Po. On the Columbia side, obviously we are able to offer the full range of federal financial aid options that I mentioned before, as well as an institutional scholarship. Scholarship awards for all four years are awarded based on both need and merit. We ask that applicants complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) as they are in the process of applying for admission to the Dual BA Program. The FAFSA, for anyone who is not familiar with the term, is a form that is completed by students to determine their eligibility for federal financial aid awards (including the Pell Grant, Federal student loans and Federal Work-Study. The FAFSA consists of numerous questions regarding a student's (and their family's) assets, income, and dependency. These are entered into a formula that determines what is called the Expected Family Contribution (EFC). A number of factors are used in determining the EFC including the household size, income, number of students from household in college, and assets (not including retirement and 401(k) funds).
  • Although Sciences Po is not able to administer federal financial aid for the first two years of the program, we ask that all everyone complete the FAFSA at the time of their application because that information is used by our financial aid team to create an estimated four-year tuition and financial aid package that will be sent to students shortly after they are notified of their admission to the Dual BA Program. This estimated financial aid package will include their Sciences Po and Columbia Scholarship awards, as well as their federal financial aid estimates over the four years of the program. Obviously, if a student’s financial situation changes, that is something our financial aid team is very responsive to, as well.
  • Here on the screen you’ll see the website for the FAFSA, as well as Columbia’s FAFSA code, which you will want to enter as you complete the form online to ensure that the information is sent to us in a timely fashion. Once again, please keep in mind that the FAFSA is an extremely important part of your college application process, as it helps each school to determine your eligibility for the whole range of federal financial aid options. Does anyone have any questions about tuition and financial aid in the Dual BA Program?
  • I want to conclude by thanking you all for taking time out of your day to learn more about the Dual BA Program. Contact information for our offices is listed behind me here, as well as in your brochures. If you have any questions or concerns as you investigate the application process, please feel free to contact our offices. My colleagues and I are happy to try to address any issues that arise. We have a few minutes for any general questions before we wrap up.

Dual BA Program Between Columbia University and Sciences Po Dual BA Program Between Columbia University and Sciences Po Presentation Transcript

  • Beyond Study Abroad —
  • History of Columbia University
  • Four Undergraduate Colleges • • Columbia
  • Four Undergraduate Colleges Columbia
  • School of General Studies Columbia
  • History of Sciences Po
  • • • • • • • • Academics Freshman and Sophomore Years – Sciences Po
  • • • • • • • • • • • Field Work Required Internship
  • • • • o o o Campuses Seven Undergraduate Campuses • •
  • Le Havre City Overview • • • • •
  • Le Havre Euro-Asia Campus • • • Region-Specific Courses • • • • •
  • Academics - Le Havre Required Courses (Year 1, Fall) • • • • • • Electives • • Languages Offered • • • • •
  • Menton City Overview • • • • • •
  • Menton Middle East & Mediterranean Campus • • • Region-Specific Courses • • • • •
  • Academics - Menton Required Courses (Year 1, Fall) • • • • • • • Languages Offered • • • • •
  • Reims City Overview • • • •
  • Reims Transatlantic Campus • • • Region-Specific Courses • • • • •
  • Academics - Reims Required Courses (Year 1, Fall) • • • • • Electives • • • Languages Offered • • • •
  • • • • • • • Academics Junior and Senior Years – Columbia
  • • • • Academics Majors
  • • • Student Life Student Services
  • • • • • Student Life Campus Life – Sciences Po
  • • • • • • Student Life Campus Life – Columbia
  • • • • • • Student Life Career Services
  • • • • • • • Admissions
  • • • Admissions
  • o o o Admissions Committee Considerations
  • Tuition and Fees • • Financing Your Education
  • Financial Aid • • • • o o o Financing Your Education
  • Financial Aid • • • Financing Your Education
  • Federal Aid • • • Financing Your Education
  • • • • Contact Us