Embrace your inner data geek

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Learn how to harness the power of numbers for marketing and advocacy purposes. We will cover what numbers you can use to market and advocate for your project, as well as how to communicate them effectively.

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  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HhOZpcqQtgQ&list=PLCE1B8F42CC5CDC8C
  • Within minutes of the data going up, students were coming in to the library asking questions:  They wanted to know more about the number of books that were circulated, what the busiest time of day was and even where they could find some of the (gulp!) non-fiction selections.  (One of my goals this year is to increase non-fiction circulation, so these last inquiries felt like a big, BIG victory to me!) But students weren't the only ones paying attention.  Several teachers came In to comment on the biggest readers for September (the top dog being a shy, sweet ELL student) and a couple even asked about the most popular books.  I love it. It's difficult to see, but to the side of my data wall, I post questions and answers. (I dream of painting a murel on that wall containing the famous Neil Gaiman quote about how Google can help you find answers, but librarians can help you find right ones - but that's a few paint cans away).  Most of the time, they are questions that someone really asks me in the library (like, where (geographically) was Charlotte's Web set?) but sometimes they are questions of my own design.  That said, there's been so much interest already in the numbers I posted that I asked a math teacher pal to help me create some math problems related to September's library numbers - the kinds of questions the kids might see on later tests.  I'll post these on the q/a wall and see what kind of response I get. (I always offer "fabulous prizes" to the scholars who come up with the answers first).  It seems like a fun way to get students interested in library data - plus, as someone who has spent her whole life avoiding math, I'm always looking for new ways to get kids to do the calculating for me.In the meantime, I'm learning a lot from my numbers too.  For example, I was totally shocked to learn that the most popular book last month was actually The Test by Peggy Kern - a recent addition to the ever popular Bluford Series.  I knew these books were popular, but if you'd have told me this little paperback would beat out Darth Paper, Origami Yoda, Wimpy Kid and the Hunger Games, I'd have scoffed.  To be fair, The Test only edged out these other great books by a circ or two, but still, I love it when the little guy wins.  Way to go, urban fiction!All in all, it was a big month for our students and the library.  I checked out just under 5,000 books, worked with 63 classes, served 1785 drop in students, hosted a book fair and managed not to lose my mind.  These are important numbers to share, but they've got me thinking about other, more curriculum driven, ways to make meaningful use of library data.  I've got to chew on this further, but I have a feeling this is just the beginning of how I spread the gospel of library throughout my school.  That said, I'd love to see other data wall examples.  If you're collecting and sharing library data this year, please let me know where I can ooh and aah at your offerings.
  • Embrace your inner data geek

    1. 1. EMBRACE YOUR INNER DATA GEEK:USE NUMBERS TO TELL YOURPROJECT’S STORYILEAD USA, June 19, 2013
    2. 2. USING NUMBERS TO TELL YOURPROJECT’S STORY Why numbers? What numbers should we use? How are libraries using numbers for marketing andadvocacy? Presenting numbers effectively in a graphic format Infographic software demo
    3. 3. WHY NUMBERS?
    4. 4. COLORADO’S BTOP PROJECT
    5. 5. 88 PUBLIC COMPUTER CENTERS
    6. 6. WHAT NUMBERS SHOULD WE COLLECT? Inputs Outputs Outcomes
    7. 7. INPUTS Quantify the effort expended on a project—resources and timeFunds (grant, matching, etc.) Number of staffHours open Staff time
    8. 8. BTOP INPUT MEASURES Grant/matching funds Computer center hours Staff hours
    9. 9. OUTPUTS Quantify the levels of services and materialsprovidedWebsite visits Email newsletter sign-upsFacebook ―likes‖ Twitter followersNumber of classes offered Number of computers forpublic useNumber of class attendees Number of users duringopen lab timeHours of class time Hours of computer useduring open lab time
    10. 10. BTOP OUTPUT MEASURES Number of classes offered Hours of class time Number of class attendees Number of one-on-one trainings Number of open access computer users Hours of open access usage
    11. 11. OUTCOMES Document the impact a project has on theparticipants, community, organizations, partners,etc.Created a resume Learned how to edit videosFound ELL resources Traced family historyFiled for unemployment Posted an item for sale onEbayApplied for a job Set up an email accountTraced family history Skyped with a familymemberDeveloped ongoingpartnership with workforceProvided community withbroadband access
    12. 12. BTOP OUTCOME MEASURES-CLASS ATTENDEESAfter taking today’s class, I am betterable to… use a computer. use the Internet. create or edit a website. view and/or share digital photos. use software (ex: Word, GoogleDocs, Photoshop, Excel,Quickbooks)
    13. 13. BTOP OUTCOME MEASURES-OPEN ACCESS USERSWhile I was on a computer in thecomputer center today, I looked for employment. used software (ex: Google Docs,Excel, Word, Photoshop). communicated with someone (ex:email, chat, Facebook). did schoolwork.
    14. 14. WHAT NUMBERS CAN YOU COLLECTFOR YOUR PROJECT?
    15. 15. HOW ARE LIBRARIES USINGNUMBERS FOR MARKETING ANDADVOCACY?
    16. 16. MAKING NUMBERS & OTHERINFORMATION MORE VISUAL
    17. 17. THE CHALLENGE: 2012 AVERAGE ACADEMICLIBRARIAN SALARIESBroken down by:-Region: West/Southwest vs. AllUS regions-Type of institution: 2-year, 4-year, university-Position: Director, AssistantDirector, Dept. Head, Manager,Non-Supervisory Librarian,Beginning Librarian=18 comparisons
    18. 18. TWO FREE TOOLSINFOGRAPHICS
    19. 19. START WITH THE NUMBERS
    20. 20. DESIGN TIPS Delivery method Comparisons Factoids Think outside thechartBill & Melinda Gates Foundation. (2012). Infographic: American public libraries & community internet access.Retrieved from http://visual.ly/american-public-libraries-community-internet-access
    21. 21. DESIGN TIPS Template features White space Color Icons ―Standalone-ability‖ Inspiration visual.ly coolinfographics.com mashable.com/category/infographics dailyinfographic.com pinterest.com pewresearch.orgColorado State Library. (2013). Infographic: Benefits of a digitally literate community. Retrieved fromhttp://www.cde.state.co.us/cdelib/btop/download/pdf/BTOPBenefitsMarch2013.pdf
    22. 22. SHOW > TELLAmerican Library Association. (2012). Infographic: Weather the storm. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/research/plftas/2011_2012/weatheringthestormBestcolleges.com. (2013). Infographic: Teaching with the Library of Congress. Retrieved from http://www.bestcollegesonline.com/blog/2013/01/10/teaching-with-the-library-of-congress/Library Research Service. (2013). Infographic: School libraries & student achievement. Retrieved from http://www.lrs.org/news/2013/02/27/make-the-case-for-school-libraries-with-our-new-impact-studies-infographic/What do YOU think?
    23. 23. START WITH THE NUMBERS
    24. 24. DEMO #1 – EASEL.LY easel.ly Create free account Example numbers: 2011-12 Public Library Funding& Technology Access survey plinternetsurvey.org
    25. 25. EASEL.LY Themes Export as JPG Drag & drop Cloning objects Guides Limited to existingtheme objects, format,size No help tool Limited text editor Limited icon edits No chart creatorPros Cons
    26. 26. YOUR TURN!
    27. 27. DEMO #2 - PIKTOCHART piktochart.com Create free account Example numbers: 2011-12 Public Library Funding& Technology Access survey plinternetsurvey.org
    28. 28. PIKTOCHART Many icons/images Color codes Chart wizard Page resize Edit layout options Export as JPG/PNG orcreate link Watermark No workspace Odd behavior whenzoom in Limited image editing Limited FAQPros Cons
    29. 29. YOUR TURN!
    30. 30. DISCUSSION
    31. 31. THANK YOU!Linda Hofschire, Hofschire_L@cde.state.co.usMeghan Wanucha, Wanucha_M@cde.state.co.uswww.lrs.org@lrs_co

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