Ip Adressing Intro
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Ip Adressing Intro Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Data Networking Year 2
      • IP Addressing Revisited
      • Colm Bennett
  • 2. IP Addressing
    • 32 Bit number, 4 decimal parts, e.g.192.168.1.0
    • Unique Host Address
    • Subnet Mask
      • Identifies which part of the IP address is the Network Address and which is the Host Address
    • Default Gateway
      • IP Address of the router on the same physical segment
  • 3. Network/Host
    • Network ID
      • Same for all hosts on the one physical segment
      • Unique within the overall network
    • Host ID
      • Identifies a particular device within this segment
      • Unique within the segment
  • 4. Physical Segment
    • Broadcast domain
      • i.e. The part of the network that will respond to a broadcast packet
    • So repeaters, bridges, switches etc all included as they forward on broadcasts
    • But routers don't so a segment is...
        • All devices out of one port of a router
        • All devices between router
    • All devices have same network ID and a unique Host ID
  • 5. Classes
    • Class A
      • First Octet 0-127
      • Network.Host.Host.Host
    • Class B
      • First Octet 128-191
      • Network.Network.Host.Host
    • Class C
      • First Octet 192-223
      • Network.Network.Network.Host
    • D and E are for special uses
  • 6. Classes
    • Easy way to remember
      • Each class is half the size of the previous
      • 256 possible values for the first Octet
      • Half these are given to class A
        • 1-127
      • Half the remaining 128 (64) are given to B
        • 128-191
      • Half the remaining 64 (32) are given to C
        • 192-223
      • And again for D and E
  • 7. Private Address Spaces
    • Class A
      • 10.0.0.0
    • Class B
      • 16 Class B's starting from 172.16.0.0
    • Class C
      • 256 Class C's starting from 192.168.0.0
  • 8. Subnet Mask
    • Subnet Mask is 32 bit number that indicates the network and host parts of an IP address
    • 1's indicate the network part, 0's the host part
    • Doesn't have any real meaning in isolation
      • Only makes sense when used with an IP address
    • What are the subnet masks implied in the standard Class A, B & C networks?
  • 9. Alternative Notation
    • “Slash” notation puts a number after the IP Address indicating how many bits will be used for the network address
    • Sometimes called the “Prefix” as it indicates the IP address is prefixed with a certain number of network bits
    • So 192.168.5.0 /24 means the first 24 bits are the network part
      • Same as subnet mask of 255.255.255.0
  • 10. How Many IDs for each class?
    • Network Ids
      • Simply take the total maximum number of the network part for that Class
        • Exception are two class A's not available – 0 and 127
        • 127 is reserved for Loopback and diagnostics
      • e.g. Class C 192.0.0 .0 - 223.255.255 .255
        • So max number of network Ids is 32*256*256
        • 2,097,152
  • 11. How Many Ids for each class?
    • Host Ids
      • Don't use all 0's or all 1's host Ids
      • All 0's identifies the network
      • All 1's is the network broadcast address
    • So always take 2 off the possible hosts
    • Class C (255.255.255.0) has the last octet for hosts
      • So 256 – 2 = 254
    • Other Classes?