IndustrializationWas the rise of industry good for theUnited States?
“Everythingthat can beinvented hasbeeninvented.”-Charles H. Duell,Commissioner, US PatentOffice, 1899
What are the3 mostimportantinventions ofyour lifetime?
What are the3 mostimportantinventions ofyour lifetime?Write a sentence ortwo explaining howeach has changedyour life.
Note Set UpCut out graphs.Attach eachgraph, in order,to your ownpaper.
13.1, page 163
13.1, page 163Who was the Wizard ofMenlo Park?What did he invent?What details do younotice in thephotograph on page162?
Key Factors to Industrialization    natural resources          coal, oil, iron ore•   improved transportation      •   rai...
Americans Invest in NewTechnologycapitalists provided $ forscientific research that ledto new inventionscapitalists provide...
Americans Invest in NewTechnology    Capitalism•   patent, sole legal right to    make or sell invention           1860=36...
Revolutionary Changes inCommunication & Transportation telegraph lines     dramatic progress     in communication     mess...
Revolutionary Changes in Communication &Transportation    1900=1,000,000 miles    telegraph wires=60,000,000    annual mes...
Consolidated Rail Lines Inexpensive and faster shipping RR companies laid track side by side so traffic could move in both ...
Time ZonesRailroads led to the creation of time zones.
New Sources of Fuelrock oil > drillingoil drilling and refiningindustry boomsprovides fuel/gas/oil forlamps, machines,autom...
The Bessemer Processturns iron > steelsteel rails, longerbridges, skyscrapersCarnegie SteelCompany    largest steel    pro...
Brooklyn Bridge1st steel wire suspension bridge
FlatironBuildingOne of the 1stskyscrapers
Electricity	 artificial light allowed businesses to stay open at home      work at night      appliances
New Ways to Manage Workmass production    interchangeable    parts    unskilled workers    & supervisorsincrease productiv...
News Ways to Finance &Organize Businessfactors of production    land, labor, and    capitolcapitol    any asset that can  ...
News Ways to Finance &Organize Businesscorporations    formed to provide    businesses capitol    to expand    run by stoc...
example - Standard OilJohn D. Rockefeller“bought out” & mergedwith other companiesmade deals to cutprices    forced others...
Rockefeller Created a Trust stockholders of independent companies agree to exchange shares of stock for trust certificates ...
“Big Business” (image pg. 171) horizontal integration     joining firms together from the same field     Rockefeller & oil=b...
IndustrializationWas the rise of industry good for theUnited States?
Laissez-faire “allow to do” the market’s supply and demand will regulate itself without gov. interference HOWEVER, big bus...
Social Darwinismbased on Darwin’stheory of evolutionthe best run business,with the best leaders,would prosper“survival of ...
What did laissez-faire andsocial Darwinism have incommon?
What did laissez-faire andsocial Darwinism have incommon?They both discouraged the government fromregulating business prac...
Laissez-Faire & SocialDarwinism, Reality gov. helped businesses     gave RRs land     sold natural     resources at low   ...
Sherman Antitrust Act, 1890outlawed trusts, monopolies, and forms of businessthat restricted tradevague language left the ...
The GildedAge“1. covered orhighlighted with gold”“2. a pleasingappearance thatconceals somethingof little worth”
Andrew Carnegie, steel1870-1900 steelproduction 77,000 tons >11 million tonsdominated the steelindustry with horizontalint...
Carnegie’s Philanthropy“A man who dies rich diesdisgraced.”Carnegie Corporation ofNY    offered grants to    support educa...
John D. Rockefeller, oil Standard Oil, used ruthless business tactics formed a monopoly using horizontal integration contr...
Cornelius Vanderbilt, rr age 16 started ferry business steamships NY > SF RR stock investments     1st NY > Chicago     di...
Robber Barons or Captainsof Industry?philanthropyushered in modern economygreat efficiency andproductivitycreated jobslivin...
Labor Conditionsexhausting schedulehazardousenvironmentslittle pay
Child Laborexpected to do samework for less payperformed the mostdangerous jobs
Living Conditions most workers, especially immigrants, lived in slums cook, eat, and sleep in the same room diseases flouri...
Living Conditions
Trusts and GovernmentCorruption	by 1904 319 industrialist trusts swallowed 5,300independent companieshigh tariffsanti-unio...
Impact of Industrialism benefitted middle class with mid-level jobs poor water and sewage systems little education among fa...
Change and Discriminationwomen entered workforce, but paid lesswomen in textile mills got 50% of men’s pay2 million child ...
Organized Laborshorter hoursmore payelimination of child laborsome unions discriminatedstrikes and violence
Food Contaminationfraud-narcotics sold as curescanned foods-dangerous additivesMuckraker’s, The Jungle, McClure’s    used ...
Toll on Environment mining clear cutting forests overgrazing livestock chicago river - “great open sewer” air pollution fr...
Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire
Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire
Industrialization
Industrialization
Industrialization
Industrialization
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  • Industrialization

    1. 1. IndustrializationWas the rise of industry good for theUnited States?
    2. 2. “Everythingthat can beinvented hasbeeninvented.”-Charles H. Duell,Commissioner, US PatentOffice, 1899
    3. 3. What are the3 mostimportantinventions ofyour lifetime?
    4. 4. What are the3 mostimportantinventions ofyour lifetime?Write a sentence ortwo explaining howeach has changedyour life.
    5. 5. Note Set UpCut out graphs.Attach eachgraph, in order,to your ownpaper.
    6. 6. 13.1, page 163
    7. 7. 13.1, page 163Who was the Wizard ofMenlo Park?What did he invent?What details do younotice in thephotograph on page162?
    8. 8. Key Factors to Industrialization natural resources coal, oil, iron ore• improved transportation • railroad (RR), mechanized farming equipment• growing labor force-immigration innovation in technologies (inventions & innovation) “social Darwinism” philosophy• laissez-faire government policies no income tax, no environmental controls
    9. 9. Americans Invest in NewTechnologycapitalists provided $ forscientific research that ledto new inventionscapitalists provided $ tobuild RR’s, mills, factories,machinery, supplies.....capitalism-economicsystem in which factories,equipment, and othermeans of production areprivately owned
    10. 10. Americans Invest in NewTechnology Capitalism• patent, sole legal right to make or sell invention 1860=36,000 • 1900=600,000• Edison=1,093 patents light bulb
    11. 11. Revolutionary Changes inCommunication & Transportation telegraph lines dramatic progress in communication messages sent anywhere, quickly Morse Code telephones businesses and homes connected with quick contact
    12. 12. Revolutionary Changes in Communication &Transportation 1900=1,000,000 miles telegraph wires=60,000,000 annual messages RRs & newspapers• 1893=250,000 phones• 1920=13,000,000• 2011 U.S. pop 310,866,000 - 327,577,529 cell phones• 2011 China’s pop 1,341,000,000 - 9,757,000,000 cell phones
    13. 13. Consolidated Rail Lines Inexpensive and faster shipping RR companies laid track side by side so traffic could move in both directions caused time zones to be created
    14. 14. Time ZonesRailroads led to the creation of time zones.
    15. 15. New Sources of Fuelrock oil > drillingoil drilling and refiningindustry boomsprovides fuel/gas/oil forlamps, machines,automobiles....
    16. 16. The Bessemer Processturns iron > steelsteel rails, longerbridges, skyscrapersCarnegie SteelCompany largest steel production investor
    17. 17. Brooklyn Bridge1st steel wire suspension bridge
    18. 18. FlatironBuildingOne of the 1stskyscrapers
    19. 19. Electricity artificial light allowed businesses to stay open at home work at night appliances
    20. 20. New Ways to Manage Workmass production interchangeable parts unskilled workers & supervisorsincrease productivity no wasted motion assembly lines
    21. 21. News Ways to Finance &Organize Businessfactors of production land, labor, and capitolcapitol any asset that can be used to produce an income
    22. 22. News Ways to Finance &Organize Businesscorporations formed to provide businesses capitol to expand run by stock ownersmonopoly a company that dominates a particular industry
    23. 23. example - Standard OilJohn D. Rockefeller“bought out” & mergedwith other companiesmade deals to cutprices forced others out of businessmonopoly-controlled90% US oil production
    24. 24. Rockefeller Created a Trust stockholders of independent companies agree to exchange shares of stock for trust certificates still receive dividends, but lose control of management monopoly created
    25. 25. “Big Business” (image pg. 171) horizontal integration joining firms together from the same field Rockefeller & oil=bought other companies vertical integration taking control of every step in production and distribution Carnegie & steel=raw materials > manufacturing > storage > distribution
    26. 26. IndustrializationWas the rise of industry good for theUnited States?
    27. 27. Laissez-faire “allow to do” the market’s supply and demand will regulate itself without gov. interference HOWEVER, big business was limiting competition, which hurt consumers
    28. 28. Social Darwinismbased on Darwin’stheory of evolutionthe best run business,with the best leaders,would prosper“survival of the fittest”
    29. 29. What did laissez-faire andsocial Darwinism have incommon?
    30. 30. What did laissez-faire andsocial Darwinism have incommon?They both discouraged the government fromregulating business practices.
    31. 31. Laissez-Faire & SocialDarwinism, Reality gov. helped businesses gave RRs land sold natural resources at low prices taxed foreign goods businesses bribed gov. free land for cash payments
    32. 32. Sherman Antitrust Act, 1890outlawed trusts, monopolies, and forms of businessthat restricted tradevague language left the law hard to enforcecourts interpreted in favor of big business
    33. 33. The GildedAge“1. covered orhighlighted with gold”“2. a pleasingappearance thatconceals somethingof little worth”
    34. 34. Andrew Carnegie, steel1870-1900 steelproduction 77,000 tons >11 million tonsdominated the steelindustry with horizontalintegration1890, Carnegie made $25million, average workermade $440
    35. 35. Carnegie’s Philanthropy“A man who dies rich diesdisgraced.”Carnegie Corporation ofNY offered grants to support education built more than 2,500 public libraries San Diego library 1899, $60,000
    36. 36. John D. Rockefeller, oil Standard Oil, used ruthless business tactics formed a monopoly using horizontal integration controlled 90% of oil and raised prices America’s 1st billionaire & world’s richest man
    37. 37. Cornelius Vanderbilt, rr age 16 started ferry business steamships NY > SF RR stock investments 1st NY > Chicago direct service
    38. 38. Robber Barons or Captainsof Industry?philanthropyushered in modern economygreat efficiency andproductivitycreated jobsliving standards climbedAmericans demanded goodsand services
    39. 39. Labor Conditionsexhausting schedulehazardousenvironmentslittle pay
    40. 40. Child Laborexpected to do samework for less payperformed the mostdangerous jobs
    41. 41. Living Conditions most workers, especially immigrants, lived in slums cook, eat, and sleep in the same room diseases flourished
    42. 42. Living Conditions
    43. 43. Trusts and GovernmentCorruption by 1904 319 industrialist trusts swallowed 5,300independent companieshigh tariffsanti-union police and courtscity bosses
    44. 44. Impact of Industrialism benefitted middle class with mid-level jobs poor water and sewage systems little education among factory workers diseases in filthy cities inflated prices at company stores long hours and injuries on job low pay, but better than Europe
    45. 45. Change and Discriminationwomen entered workforce, but paid lesswomen in textile mills got 50% of men’s pay2 million child laborersminorities and immigrants CA, Chinese self employed to make more $businesses pitted minorities against each other
    46. 46. Organized Laborshorter hoursmore payelimination of child laborsome unions discriminatedstrikes and violence
    47. 47. Food Contaminationfraud-narcotics sold as curescanned foods-dangerous additivesMuckraker’s, The Jungle, McClure’s used writing to expose corruption and wrongdoing
    48. 48. Toll on Environment mining clear cutting forests overgrazing livestock chicago river - “great open sewer” air pollution from burning coal to power machines
    49. 49. Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire
    50. 50. Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire

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