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Tqr staff capability development 2010
 

Tqr staff capability development 2010

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    Tqr staff capability development 2010 Tqr staff capability development 2010 Presentation Transcript

    • TQR Staff Capability Development 2010 Project Manager interview presentation January 28,2010 “ Educators benefit from collegial support, sharing experiences, ideas and examples”
    • Teaching and learning skills –immediate priorities
      • Delivery through e-learning
      • Designing RPL tools
      • Instructional design
      • Delivery through distance learning
      • Holding videoconferences
      • RPL processes and methods
    • What I would do?
      • Develop a focused project management plan with key stakeholders
    • Personal philosophy PD success 21 st century learning
      • Renewal –doing things in new ways but with a new spirit confirming and reiterating an established practice but with a focus on renovation and the development of a rich learning culture for all
      • So… Integrating available and emerging technology in the context of mindful inquiry collaborative projects , access to resources , tools and support which promotes pedagogical renewal will work!
      • Strategic Plan TQR Institutes – People strategy.
    • PET Project
      • Professional extreme teams is a model of team -based project work:
        • everything team members do is underpinned by professional development. It is critical to the organisation that the team succeeds in reaching an outcome that addresses its needs even though the resolution may be new and unexpected. There is the combination of a project that is real with action learning, mentoring and training . It is extreme in the sense of risk taking. It puts pressure on people, but they respond well. It is very intense, fast and stressful. People get a thrill and there is an exhilaration about it. It is experimental with an emphasis on fast learning.
      • A core element of an extreme team is the mixing of skill sets ;
        • mixing teachers and designers/administrators to get a dynamic sharing of knowledge. The team members are aware of what skills people have and what skills need to be shared. Sometimes people may be matched with people they don’t know based on skill sets and what is required for the project. It is important to balance the outcomes the organisation wants with the personal outcomes people get from participating.
    • STAT authority benefits for teachers
      • Teaching staff will be able to collaborate more effectively with more colleagues in the same organisation to deliver better learning outcomes. (A rich teaching and learning culture, Blended delivery, )
      • We will have the ability to create self managed teams of substance e.g. 10 team members in all six Institutes rather than 2 in each Institute. (A positive team culture, sustainable practices and innovation through ICT)
    • Prosci Model – Project management defined
      • Project Management is the set of processes and tools applied to business projects to develop and implement a change. One of the key components of effective Project Management is having the change defined – you must know what is changing (processes, systems, job roles, organizational structure, etc.) in order to manage that change effectively .
      • Project Management also involves an understanding of the tradeoffs between time, cost, and scope of a change.
      • Finally, Project Management is the application of the discipline called “project management” that is a structured approach for managing tasks, resources, and budget in order to achieve a defined deliverable.
    • PROSCI Project management
      • Project Management factor assessment 1/2/3
      • 1. The change is clearly defined including what the change will look like and who is impacted by the change.
      • 2. The project has a clearly defined scope.
      • 3. The project has specific objectives that define success.
      • 4. Project milestones have been identified and a project schedule has been created.
      • 5. A project manager has been assigned to manage the project resources and tasks.
      • 6. A work breakdown structure has been completed and deliverables have been identified.
      • 7. Resources for the project team have been identified and acquired based on the work breakdown structure.
      • 8. Periodic meetings are scheduled with the project team to track progress and resolve issues.
      • 9. The executive sponsor is readily available to work on issues that impact dates, scope or resources.
      • 10. The project plan has been integrated with the change management plan.
      • Score: (total possible is 30)
    • Enhancing the capability of VET staff
      • Looking to the future environment for VET practitioners, Dickie, Eccles, FitzGerald and McDonald (2004) in Enhancing the Capability of VET Professionals Project: Final Report (ANTA) note that diversity and change will become common:
      • … there appears to be considerable consensus about the environment in which VET professionals will work in the future – an environment characterised by increasing diversity in the client base; increasing sophistication in client expectations;
      • change in products and expansion of options for training delivery; changes in employment, work roles, team structures and places of work; increasing competition and increasing demand; and globalisation of the training market.
    • Staff capability and innovation
      • Callan (2004) investigated the features of innovative VET organisations and found that highly innovative organisations demonstrate six key characteristics. Innovative VET organisations:
      • create learning cultures which promote innovation as a core organisational capability;
      • employ leaders who are 'failure-tolerant';
      • identify innovators;
      • reward people who propose innovative ideas;
      • use partnerships; and
      • promote innovation through teams.
      • http://www.reframingthefuture.net/docs/2005/Publications/0ALL_new_ways_of_working_05.pdf
    • References
      • Capability development TAFE NSW http://www.icvet.tafensw.edu.au/focus/capability_development.htm
      • Key concepts for designing Professional Development for the knowledge era - research project http://www.icvet.tafensw.edu.au/aboutus/ourwork/documents/concepts.pdf
      • VET Education Portal http://www.vetinformationportal.edu.au/
      • Switching on to online learning – A state-wide NSW PD strategy http://globalsummit.educationau.edu.au/globalsummit/papers/evans.pdf
      • Exploring PD practices for VET practitioners http://ajte.education.ecu.edu.au/issues/PDF/344/Williams.pdf
      • TVET workforce management tool http://workforce.tvetaustralia.com.au/welcome.aspx
      • Reframing the future 2009 http://www.reframingthefuture.net/
    • Capability development
      • Capability development focuses on the development of the individual or team through a range of measures that aim to achieve current business goals, meet future challenges and build capacity for change.
    • Job role
      • Outline to the panel how you would undertake the role of Project Manager – Training and Development to ensure that the project moves forward and fulfils its training requirements as outlined in the TAFE Qld Regional Proposal document (attached) while focussing on the challenges of both tight timeframes and the budget/estimated expenditure. 
      • Your response can be in the form of a presentation, power-point, handout or whatever you deem to be appropriate to an interview for such a role. (approximately 20 mins)
    • Project Methodology – 5C’s
      • Clarify needs /issues/ problem based learning approaches and capability champions
      • Connect – communities of practice/learning networks
      • Communicate – consistent and creative and technological
      • Collaborate – share and create
      • Capability – implement, measure and achieve outcomes and plan future strategies
    • Project management approach http://www.projectsmart.co.uk/role-of-the-project-manager.html
      • Communicate
      • Organise
      • Solve Problems/Make Decisions
      • Build Good Teams
      • In addition to the process groups there are the nine knowledge areas of Project Management which consist of:
      • http://www.projectsmart.co.uk/role-of-project-managers.html
      • Integration Management
      • Scope Management
      • Time Management
      • Cost Management
      • Quality Management
      • Human Resource Management
      • Communications Management
      • Risk Management
      • Procurement Management
    • Knowledge workers –VET practitioners
      • http://innovateandintegrate.flexiblelearning.net.au/
      • http://pre2005.flexiblelearning.net.au/projects/resources/PDFutureReport.pdf
        • Professional development approaches for knowledge workers needs to address the following commonalities of knowledge work:
        • sharing
        • multiplicity of description within the working environment
        • knowing as an active process rather that knowledge as an object
        • the importance of certain relationships between knowledge workers and ways of behaving
        • the enormous value of ‘ignorance’ as in admitting to not knowing and being able to ask for help – everything of value and creative comes out of not knowing
        • problematising the concept of the ‘expert’
        • Knowledge workers are driven by passion, not by expertise. They, like all, are caught within their own assumptions but moving beyond those of the present by being involved in learning as a social act.
    • Knowledge workers and PD
      • Appropriate professional development for VET staff and managers for working and learning in the knowledge era is that which focuses on creating groups of:
        • knowing workers where the effectiveness of the interactions amongst the group is greater than the contributions of each individual. This is a different concept of professional development, one that is not captured by notions of professional development being about attendance at external, one -off events or about just building up individuals’ stocks of static knowledge.
        • Appropriate approaches would include those that:
        • encourage coherent and metaphoric conversations
        • build collaborative climates within organisations
        • engage staff learning with their customers , particularly their students
        • locate expertise as required from within and without the organisation, and
        • match individual worker aspirations with the goals of the organisation through job sculpturing.
    • Research implications – PD and knowledge workers in VET (1)
      • Professional development activities need to have a high level of immediate applicability.
      • There is a need to identify, celebrate and champion people doing innovative things leading to the sharing of innovative knowledge to ensure that it goes beyond the ‘few to the ‘many’
      • Identification of knowledge that is to be shared can be limited to current knowledge – it is essential that knowledge shared is ‘quality’, fresh, new and innovative.
      • Professional development models must move beyond simply the identification of knowledge held by a work group to the matter of application of this knowledge.
      • Knowledge workers in the VET sector includes all staff, not just the VET deliverer – no one can be in a silo.
      • Outcomes of professional development should be relevant to the organisational goals (mission critical activities) and, ultimately, be of benefit to both staff and students as clients.
      • What is the ICT literacy baseline for workers to be able to participate in quality professional development for knowledge workers?
    • Research implications – PD and knowledge workers in VET (2)
      • It is important to use ICT as a component, as a literacy, in that technology enables access to and management of information relevant to one’s development.
      • Induction and orientation of new staff into a community of learning: the idea of lifelong learning to be introduced to new staff in whatever form that might take in the organisation. This professional learning could lead to a credential offered by the RTO.
      • Professional development activities need to be mission critical and project based. All professional development should have performance outcomes measurable against benefits for clients.
      • Components of professional development programs could include visits across organisations to share knowledge with mutual benefit. These visits could be linked to the notion of practicums to enable a less skilled teacher to be matched with someone more skilled
      • Mentoring models with an emphasis on low cost, mutual benefit and recognition for early innovators.
      • Internal professional development activities across each organisation with an emphasis on sharing the experience of the learning with other people in the organisation.
    • Research implications – PD and knowledge workers in VET (3)
      • Extreme teams: this is a model of team -based project work in which everything team members do is underpinned by professional development. It is critical to the organisation that the team succeeds in reaching an outcome that addresses its needs even though the resolution may be new and unexpected. There is the combination of a project that is real with action learning, mentoring and training . It is extreme in the sense of risk taking. It puts pressure on people, but they respond well. It is very intense, fast and stressful. People get a thrill and there is an exhilaration about it. It is experimental with an emphasis on fast learning.
      • A core element of an extreme team is the mixing of skill sets ; for example, mixing teachers and designers to get a dynamic sharing of knowledge. The team members are aware of what skills people have and what skills need to be shared. Sometimes people may be matched with people they don’t know based on skill sets and what is required for the project. It is important to balance the outcomes the organisation wants with the personal outcomes people get from participating.
      • Relevance: professional development models need to be linked to action based outcomes that have relevance. For example, the knowledge teachers seek is for their students. Teachers want to take what they have learnt and, as a team, develop teaching and learning materials and the possibility of building in other knowledge and skills. This is the only way professional development models would work – utilising the what’s in it for me approach.
      • Challenge: the idea of the knowledge worker as someone with the ability to find information and bring it into the work group relates to the community of practice idea and the empowering of people not to be dependent on experts. Having others out there who challenge is important. Professional development models need to encourage feedback from others, facilitation and the communities of learning.
      • Facilitation: it is critical to have effective facilitators to provide direction.
    • Research implications – PD and knowledge workers in VET (4)
      • This is going beyond professional development as normally understood; it involves looking at the whole organisation and introducing catalysts for change through the way staff work and learn together. But there is a need to flesh out the underlying principles that will enable this new way of working to occur. This is a change of mindset involving a move away from ‘where’s the professional development program/activity to enrol in?’ way of thinking.
      • The catalyst could be a learning contract that is built into staff performance appraisal processes through which individual career aspirations are matched to an organisational focus. The learning contract needs to be underpinned by explicit organisational values and supported by networks and relationships in the workplace that enable work tasks and projects to be completed while keeping the responsibility for learning on the individual.
    • Research implications – PD and knowledge workers in VET (5)
      • It could build on the positive community of practice experiences of VET staff where, through action, collaboration and reflection, the outcomes have been passion, exploration and expanded ways of knowing.
      • The work context is important in professional development. People need to have a practical outcome in mind as a reference for deciding which learning components are to be applied. The way people learn is through working so they develop the ability to access a range of information that then leads to behavioural changes.
      • Knowledge work is not only about searching for information and sharing. It is also about the generation of new knowledge. But ‘in the beginning is the job’. The creative stuff comes from what people have to do - what the task is and the ideas needed to get there. Knowledge generation is contextualised - it’s not just ‘let’s share ideas’. There is a function, a job, a reason for doing it. It’s not just developing aptitudes, but developing processes to doing things differently aligned to work.
      • The issue is recognising that this approach to professional development is really about developing models in learning -to-learn that can then be situated, contextualised according to individual and organisational needs.
      • While professional development projects are seen as special initiatives they stay on the periphery of the real work of the organisation. But when these are mainstreamed they lead towards organisational change.
    • Research implications – PD and knowledge workers in VET (6)
      • Mentoring and coaching roles: train staff into these roles and explore the mentoring relationship from other cultural perspectives..
      • Cross organisation collaborations.
      • Trust building as a core principle throughout professional development but with activities that develop the trust. People need to understand that there is a sharing focus in the activities but then individuals need to be allowed to decide on the level of sharing. Getting people to get to know each other before sharing knowledge is important.
      • Spheres of influence: individuals and groups identify their spheres of influence in their organisation then move out from this through advocacy. This may involve communities of practice within and without the organisation
      • Mapping personal learning pathways: this activity develops an awareness of the type of knowers we are. It can be an iterative process.
      • Lessons learned: this is a reflective process leading to an appreciation of the methods used by individuals for learning new things.
      • Knowledge valuing: within the organisation individuals and groups need to feel that their ways of knowing and the knowledge they share is valued. This can be achieved through acknowledgement, appreciation and recognition by managers and colleagues of knowledge workers’ efforts and contributions. Promotion of contributions made to the knowledge organisation may be an appropriate strategy.
      • Leadership development must be a focus of professional development for the future. ‘Who’s directing this?’
      • It may be better to refer to this conceptualisation of professional development in terms of development cycles for both individual knowledge workers and their employing organisations.
      • Attention must be given to the development of ‘processes’ within the organisation that act as enablers for knowledge worker development. These processes relate to the building of trust, supporting risk taking and
      • reflection, and balancing competition with cooperation.
    • Enablers of knowledge worker professional development
      • Integration of information technology with the social milieu of the workplace
      • Discovering the whole by going further into its parts
      • Connecting to the identity of the organisation
      • In the beginning was the job and what’s in it for me
      • Go radical but be mission-critical
      • Designing professional development from inside out
      • Be iterative but don’t get lost in circles
      • Intuition is good
      • The enablers identified by this research will nourish a diversity of professional development approaches and activities informed by established professional development best practice and workers’ requirements.
        • http://pre2005.flexiblelearning.net.au/projects/resources/PDFutureReport.pdf
    • Job role (2)
      • Discuss with the panel how you would identify and approach the staff to undertake this capacity building training outlined in the Proposal. (approximately 5-10 mins)
    • READY .. SET… GO PD Approach
      • This ready, set go approach recognises that professional development programs for educators need to be timely, supported and outcomes based for both personal and organisational benefit.
      • It considers that learning requires motivation, just in time learning and is both formal and informal in nature.
      • It recognises that learning is social collaborative and networked and can be enehanced with technological in the 21 st century.
    • READY… SET… GO
    • READY
      • R
      • E
      • A
      • D
      • Y
    • SET
      • S
      • E
      • T
    • GO
      • G
      • O
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    • Approach – connections
      • Identify and leverage existing networks
      • Identify and leverage existing informal learning activities
      • Lead vocational teacher network
      • Current innovative practitioners
      • Current innovative practice
      • In-house facilitators and leaders
    • Approach - communication
    • Approach - collaboration
    • Approach - creativity
    •  
    •