City of Gold Coast - Draft Accessible and Inclusive City Action Plan 2013 - 2018
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

City of Gold Coast - Draft Accessible and Inclusive City Action Plan 2013 - 2018

on

  • 2,178 views

City of Gold Coast has developed the Draft Accessible and Inclusive City Action Plan 2013-2018 in consultation with community and stakeholders groups, with the aim to improve access for everyone of ...

City of Gold Coast has developed the Draft Accessible and Inclusive City Action Plan 2013-2018 in consultation with community and stakeholders groups, with the aim to improve access for everyone of all abilities to the City's properties, services, programs, information, communication and employment processes.

The final endorsed Plan will be registered with the Australian Human Rights Commission.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
2,178
Views on SlideShare
757
Embed Views
1,421

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0

3 Embeds 1,421

http://gchaveyoursay.com.au 1402
http://www.gchaveyoursay.com.au 17
http://www.gchaveyoursay.com 2

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

City of Gold Coast - Draft Accessible and Inclusive City Action Plan 2013 - 2018 Document Transcript

  • 1. Draft Accessible and Inclusive City Action Plan 2013-2018 Everyone’s included
  • 2. Contents Foreword............................................................................................................1 Our achievements..............................................................................................3 Executive summary...........................................................................................5 Purpose .............................................................................................................7 Vision .................................................................................................................8 Context ..............................................................................................................9 Community consultation.................................................................................13 Priority areas...................................................................................................15 Priority Area 1: City services and information..................................................................16 Priority Area 2: Customer contact and community engagement.....................................28 Priority Area 3: City buildings, community facilities and recreational facilities.............36 Priority Area 4: Pedestrian environments, public transport infrastructure and car parking........................................................................................50 Priority Area 5: Planning and development......................................................................62 Priority Area 6: Tourism and events..................................................................................70 Priority Area 7: Employment and training.........................................................................78 How we will monitor, evaluate and update the plan........................................................................................87 Appendix 1: Glossary.......................................................................................89 Appendix 2: Engagement methods.................................................................90 Appendix 3: Stakeholders...............................................................................92
  • 3. Foreword As Mayor, I want to see our city as a place where nobody is left behind. 'Everyone’s included - Accessible and Inclusive City Action Plan' is the City of Gold Coast’s (the City’s) next big step towards creating a city that is genuinely accessible and inclusive for all. This Plan will make our city a better place to live and visit for people of all age groups and abilities. Providing good access makes good business sense and will ensure we are nationally and internationally recognised as an accessible destination. The title of this Plan, 'Everyone’s included' sets the tone for the City’s proactive model of supporting an organisational culture where equity of access is routinely considered across our operations. The Plan sets the strategic direction for ensuring that we are doing all we can to remove barriers to access and inclusion. Taking into consideration the challenging economic conditions, it details the actions that will be taken to plan for progressive improvement in the delivery of quality infrastructure, facilities, services and information for all. As we strive towards our City Vision, the Accessible and Inclusive City Action Plan fulfils a commitment to our residents and visitors. It promotes compliance with the requirements of the Disability Discrimination Act 1992 (Cth) and the Anti-Discrimination Act 1991 (Qld). However, the plan is not just about avoiding discrimination, it directly seeks to establish an accessible and welcoming environment for the diverse people who live, work and play here. Capturing the community’s needs and aspirations to inform the Action Plan would not have been possible without cooperative input from the community and organisations who work in and with the community on a daily basis. I sincerely thank all of the community members and organisations who took the time to provide input. I am pleased to present the Accessible and Inclusive City Action Plan to the people of our city - it is our proactive and public commitment to improving accessibility for all. I look forward to seeing the positive outcomes of this Plan over the next five years. Tom Tate, Mayor CITY OF GOLD COAST 1
  • 4. Photographer John Mills
  • 5. Our achievements The City of Gold Coast is proud of its achievements in the areas of improved access to buildings, facilities, services and programs. Below are examples of our successes in improving access and inclusion. Our commitment to best practice has received public recognition by disability organisations, access consultants and the State Government. A recent example of best practice provision is the City’s All Abilities Playground at Kurrawa Beach/Pratten Park (partly funded by the State Government). This playground offers a change facility which contains an adjustable change table and ceiling hoist to assist people with disabilities, their families and carers. This change facility will allow personal care needs to be more easily met, improving access to the playground. This change facility is one of only two such facilities provided by local governments in Australia, and the first facility of its kind in Queensland. Another project is the Gold Coast Rapid Transit (GCRT) Corridor Access and Mobility Study (CAMS) which is a key component of the award winning Gold Coast Rapid Transit Corridor Study. The CAMS study identified access issues for the walk-up areas within a 200 metre radius of the proposed GCRT stations across the whole of the light rail corridor. The information presented in the CAMS study will be used to ensure the walk up areas to these light rail stations are safe and accessible for all of the community. Other awards include: •• Gold Coast Urban Design Award 2007 Innovation in Urban Design - Gold Coast Oceanway •• Disability Action Week Award 2008 for Building Accessible Housing and Environments (Qld) •• Inclusive Community Champion Award 2010 Regional Winner for Best Recreational Leisure Entertainment Venue or Precinct for the Southport Broadwater Parklands (Qld) •• Inclusive Community Champion Award 2011 Regional Winner for Best Government Department or Agency (Qld) •• Inclusive Community Champion Award 2011 State Winner for Kurrawa All Abilities Playground (Qld) •• Inclusive Community Champion Award 2012 Best Government Department or Agency — Active and Healthy Program This action plan will assist us to further our efforts in providing access and inclusion for everyone. 3
  • 6. Executive summary "Everyone’s included’, the Gold Coast’s Accessible and Inclusive City Action Plan, will improve access for all people by working towards removing access barriers across all areas of the City of Gold Coast’s operations, with the aim of allowing all people to participate fully in community life. It will enhance lifestyles and promote a stronger sense of community belonging and connectedness. The plan provides the City and the community with an approach for addressing the access and inclusion priorities identified during community consultation. To implement the Accessible and Inclusive City Action Plan, key priority areas have been identified for action over the next five years. These priority areas will help achieve a more accessible and inclusive Gold Coast. The action plan’s priority areas deal with customer service functions, employment and recruitment practices, consultative processes, planning and approval mechanisms and corporate planning and communications, as well as highlighting our commitment to providing accessible pedestrian and transport infrastructure, community and recreational facilities and civic buildings. The plan identifies actions, responsibilities and timeframes. It undertakes to improve access in a number of areas in the lead-up to the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games, including developing a mobility map for visitors to provide information on accessible facilities in the city and promoting accessible tourism through development of a Tourism Destination Management Plan. It requires engagement of access consultants in major City infrastructure projects, such as design and development of the Cultural Precinct. It commits to taking a customer-centric approach through the Customer Orientated Business Improvement project, which will improve customer access to the City through online lodgement of town planning applications and complaints and online registration of cat and dog licenses. It plans for an ageing community. Wherever possible, actions will be undertaken as part of current business processes and within existing available budgets and resources, with priority given to addressing access barriers identified by the community. These actions ensure we have a prioritised approach to a sustainable and progressive program of access improvements. The Accessible and Inclusive City Action Plan will be monitored, evaluated and updated over its fiveyear lifespan to ensure that actions are being addressed, timeframes are being met, and it remains up-to-date in a fast-changing society. 5
  • 7. Purpose The City of Gold Coast is committed to enhancing the quality of life of everyone living on the Gold Coast. Good access is important for everyone, whether it is a person walking or jogging, a mother pushing a pram, a person using a wheelchair or mobility aid, or a person with a vision impairment using one of our webpages to find information on City services or look for a job. The purpose of this plan is to assist the City in removing existing or potential access barriers and to provide equity of access for everyone, to its premises and public infrastructure, services, programs, information, communication and employment processes. The plan aligns with our vision and strategic objectives, and is consistent with section 61 of the Disability Discrimination Act (1992) by specifically: •• identifying access barriers and/or access opportunities •• outlining actions to remove barriers and/or realise opportunities •• including priorities for actions •• identifying who has responsibility for ensuring actions are completed •• outlining how monitoring, review and evaluation will be conducted. Extensive community consultation was undertaken to develop this plan. The findings from this process were important in establishing the priority actions and timeframes. The plan sets out how we will improve a wide range of municipal facilities, operations, services, employment and information including: •• buildings, facilities, infrastructure •• communications and consultations •• events •• format of information and publications •• programs and services •• service delivery methods •• signage •• staff and volunteer employment, training and support •• support services •• website and online communications. We are moving forward proactively and seeking to realise the outcomes set out in this plan in an economically challenging environment. The Accessible and Inclusive City Action Plan establishes a financially sustainable program that will result in progressive access improvements over the life of the plan. 7
  • 8. Vision The City’s vision is to create better access to our services, infrastructure and information in order to enhance community inclusiveness and connectedness. 2.1 Objectives The objectives of this plan are to: 1 acknowledge that residents and visitors to the city include people of all ages and abilities, and to ensure that everyone in our city has equal opportunity to access our facilities and services 2 provide a framework for working towards the creation of barrier-free access to all areas of City planning, services, programs, facilities, and information, communication and employment systems 3 promote opportunities for participation and inclusion of everyone in our services, events and employment 4 5 demonstrate community leadership and champion best practice assist the City to meet its legislative requirements under anti-discrimination legislation It is important to note that making the entire city accessible and inclusive is beyond the scope of this plan and our responsibility as a local government authority. However, we will continue to advocate on behalf of residents and visitors, and work in partnership with the community, business sector, professional organisations and other levels of government, on issues of access and inclusion for Gold Coast residents and visitors. 8
  • 9. Context 3.1 People The Gold Coast is Australia’s second largest Local Government Area in terms of population. It is also Australia’s sixth largest city and is growing steadily. In 2011, the estimated resident population of Gold Coast City was 536,4801. The population is expected to grow by almost 12,000 new residents each year. By 2031, the Gold Coast will be home to over 798,000 people2. The Gold Coast is also a main destination for tourists and visitors from other parts of Australia and all over the world. Over 4.2 million domestic and international tourists visited the city in the year to December 20113. People with a disability In 2009 it was estimated that the total number of Gold Coast residents with a disability was 91,700 — accounting for 16.2 per cent of the city’s total population4. Within Gold Coast City5, 28 per cent of residents with a disability were aged between 0 to 44 years and 72 per cent were aged 45 years and over (compared to 29 per cent and 71 per cent respectively for Queensland). Of residents with a disability, more than one quarter (28.6 per cent) had a profound or severe disability, and over half (54.2 per cent) had a moderate/mild disability. There were 7,300 Gold Coast residents who had a disability which restricted their schooling and/or employment. Ageing population The Gold Coast is faced with the challenge of a rapidly ageing population. In the 2011 Census, 14.4 per cent of Gold Coast residents (71,300 people) were recorded as aged 65 years or over6. By 2031, the number of residents aged 65 years or over is set to increase by almost 2.3 times to 161,100 residents, 1 As at 30 June 2011. Australian Bureau of Statistics, Regional Population Growth Australia, 20102011, catalogue 3218.0. 2 Queensland Government population projections, 2011 edition (medium series), Office of Economic and Statistical Research, Queensland Treasury. 3 Tourism and Events Queensland, Gold Coast Regional Snapshot, year ended December 2012. 4 Customised data for Gold Coast City taken from the Australian Bureau of Statistics, Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers: 2009. 5 Please note: "Gold Coast" refers to the pre-2008 Local Government Boundaries — including the Statistical Local Areas (SLAs) of Bethania-Waterford, Edens Landing-Holmview, Beenleigh, Eagleby, Mt Warren Park and Wolffdene-Bahrs Scrub - which have since become part of the Logan Local Government Area. 6 Australian Bureau of Statistics, Census of Population and Housing, 2011, Basic Community Profile — B04. 9
  • 10. accounting for over 20.2 per cent of Gold Coast City’s population7. As people get older, their level of disability increases. The ageing population will have a number of key impacts on our community. Increasing levels of impairment, both physical (especially affecting mobility) and sensory (hearing and vision). Increasing levels of cognitive impairment due to increasing number of people being diagnosed with dementia. State Electoral Division of Surfers Paradise and the Federal Electoral Division of Moncrieff both have the highest prevalence of dementia in Queensland. By 2050, it is predicted that the incidence of dementia on the Gold Coast will increase by 498 per cent.8 7 Queensland Government population projections, 2011 edition (medium series), Office of Economic and Statistical Research, Queensland Treasury. 8 2011 Alzheimer’s Australia Queensland Report — Projections of Dementia Prevalence and Incidence in Queensland 2011-2050 10
  • 11. Increasing community expectations that the built environment be designed to accommodate these impairments, e.g. accessible car parking, footpaths, kerb ramps and public toilets. Increasing community expectations that City services will cater for the needs of an ageing population, including increased access to tailored services such as our Cab Service, smaller wheelie bins and targeted recreational, library and cultural services. An ageing population impacts on all of our services and operations, highlighting the need to ensure that they are accessible for all ages and abilities. 3.2 Role of Local Government Anti-discrimination legislation The City has obligations to address issues of access and inclusion for all residents and visitors through its operations under a range of anti-discrimination legislation. This includes: •• Disability Discrimination Act 1992 (Commonwealth) •• Age Discrimination Act 2004 (Commonwealth) •• Queensland Anti-Discrimination Act 1991 (State) We also have obligations under the Disability Standards, which are given a legislative head of power through the Disability Discrimination Act 1992, and make it unlawful to contravene disability standards (s32) and also assumes liability for City of Gold Coast in so far as The City may permit another person to do an unlawful act, e.g. contravene the Disability Standards (s122). The Disability Standards include the following: •• Disability (Access to Premises — buildings) Standards 2010 — covering all new buildings classes 1b, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 9 and 10, including new Transport Buildings and existing buildings which undergo upgrades requiring building/construction approval •• Disability Standards for Accessible Public Transport 2002 — covering all new transport conveyances and infrastructure introduced into service after 23 October 2002. This also covers existing conveyances and infrastructure which must be timetabled for staged compliance over a 30 year period. Anti-discrimination legislation requires a local government to ensure that it does not discriminate against people on the basis of disability, age or impairment in: the provision of goods, services and facilities (section 24 of the Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act 1992, section 28 of the Commonwealth Age Discrimination Act 2004 and section 46 of the Queensland Anti-Discrimination Act 1991) to the provision of access to premises and associated facilities, that the public (or a selection of the public) are allowed to enter or use (section 23 of the Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act 1992 and section 27 of the Commonwealth Age Discrimination Act 2004) employment practices and treatment in the workplace (section 15 of the Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act 1992, section 18 of the Commonwealth Age Discrimination Act 2004 and section 15 of the Queensland Anti-Discrimination Act 1991). 11
  • 12. Why prepare a Disability Action Plan? Anti-discrimination legislation in Australia has significant implications for local government. Local governments can work towards addressing these responsibilities by the development and implementation of an effective and up-to-date Disability Action Plan under the Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act 1992, that identifies a framework for providing access for people of all ages and abilities across relevant areas of the organisation’s operations. Currently more than 170 local government authorities across Australia have registered Disability Action Plans (prepared under the Disability Discrimination Act) with the Australian Human Rights Commission (AHRC). A number of these have also registered updated and revised plans after several years, to ensure currency and relevance. Local Government Act The LGA places a number of obligations on local government authorities regarding the provision of equitable access. Principles of Local Government: Officers performing responsibilities under the LGA are to observe the principles underpinning the LGA. These principles include sustainable development and management of assets and infrastructure, and delivery of effective services (section 4(2)(b)), and democratic representation, social inclusion and meaningful community engagement (section 4(2)(c)). Best Practice: Council Officers are to provide excellence in service delivery (section 13(2)(a)(ii)) and continual improvement (section 13(2)(a)(iii)). The CEO is responsible for managing local government in a way that promotes excellence in service delivery (section 13(3)(a)(ii)) and continual improvement (section 13(3)(a)(iii)). Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO): The CEO has the responsibility of managing local government employees using management practices that promote equal employment opportunities (section 13(3)(b)(i)). The Local Government (Operations) Regulations (2010) require councils to develop and implement an EEO management plan and establish procedures to monitor compliance with EEO requirements. Access and Equity: the CEO has the responsibility of establishing and implementing practices about access and equity to ensure that community members have access to local government programs and services (section 13 (3)(d)(i)). 12
  • 13. Community consultation We sought advice and feedback about the accessibility of our operations from local residents and visitors, community representatives and our staff in the development of this plan, through community forums, focus groups, interviews, written submissions and surveys. Some of the key questions asked during the community consultation phase were: •• what is the City doing well? •• what are the access barriers and issues? •• what suggestions do you have for improving access and inclusion? •• what do you think are priorities? Feedback received through consultation informed the drafting of actions in this plan. 13
  • 14. Photographer John Mills
  • 15. Priority areas Based on community feedback, the actions in this plan have been grouped into seven sections. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 City services and information Customer contact and community engagement City buildings, community facilities and recreational facilities Pedestrian environments, public transport infrastructure and car parking Planning and development Events and tourism Employment and training Each section details: •• what the City is currently doing to promote access and inclusion in this area •• what the community said they’d like to see the City do •• actions the City has committed to in order to improve access and inclusion •• which City department is responsible for each action •• when each action will be implemented. 15
  • 16. Priority Area 1: City services and information What we are doing We are committed to ongoing improvement in all areas of public communication and interaction. In doing so, we are focusing on minimising the barriers that make it hard for some members of the community to access our online and printed information. In order to ensure that all visitors to our website can access information, we are enhancing our web publishing practices to meet the needs of people with vision impairments. This includes working with Vision Australia to incorporate more accessible online features and working with web page owners to ensure Portable Document Format (PDF) documents are provided in accessible formats compatible to screen reading devices or alternate formats on request. We are using online technology to share information and enable participation in more accessible ways, e.g. streaming Council meetings live online. Our social media platforms provide additional feedback options which enable members of the community to engage in genuine dialogue with us and have their say on current issues and matters that affect them. We produce a range of written communications in accessible formats on our services and programs and we recognise the needs of all customers including those with vision and cognitive impairments. Examples of accessible written communication includes our Community Resource Directories for Seniors and People with Disabilities and our large font Waste and Recycling Calendars. What the community said they want us to do Areas for improvement that were identified by the community include: •• access to information about City activities, services, facilities and community events •• the City to be aware of and fully utilising, available technology and systems for communicating with residents and visitors •• providing information in different formats and font sizes to suit people with vision impairment and other disabilities, and having this information prominently located on web pages for reading on screen or downloading. Community members also suggested we could advocate for the provision of information about accessible restaurants, tourist accommodation and public facilities on the Gold Coast with local business and tourist organisations. 16
  • 17. What are our key actions? What does this mean for me? Action: Review rates payment methods currently available to identify any access barriers for seniors or people with disabilities. (Refer to Action 1.4) Now I can pay my rates easily. Action: Audit immunisation service centres to identify the level of accessibility at each location. (Refer to Action 1.37) I know the locations where it is easiest for me to get immunisation for my family. Action: Continue to provide mowing assistance for road reserve areas fronting residential properties, to eligible residents who are aged or have a disability. (Refer to Action 1.39) I can get help from the City to mow the lawn in front of my house if I am physically unable to do this myself. 17
  • 18. We found it of particular help that this time the Waste Calendar was written in large print.  As many of us on the Gold Coast are ageing and some have sight loss, it is very important that the large print is easy to see.  This also helps us to get the correct day of the waste cycle.  Many thanks for your consideration. Kerry Campbell
  • 19. We will progressively improve access and inclusion to our services and information through the following actions. Outcome 1: People of all ages and abilities can access online information. Action Timeline 1.1 Conduct a review of all web pages covering major City projects, to make information accessible for people with disabilities by ensuring: Resp 2014 MP Ongoing IS •• compatibility with screen reading software •• all attachments are provided in PDF and Microsoft Word or other accessible format •• that accessible contact options are provided for people seeking further information e.g. email, phone and National Relay Service. 1.2 Provide and upgrade Information and Communication Technology (ICT) facilities and services that meet defined requirements for accessibility. Key Resp Responsibility CC Corporate Communication CD City Development DMU Disaster Management Unit GCW Gold Coast Water HR&LS Health Regulatory and Lifeguard Services IS Information Services MP Major Projects PMO Program Management Office P&RS Parks and Recreational Services RS Revenue Services SD&CS Social Development and Community Safety TP Tourist Parks W&RM Waste and Resources Management 19
  • 20. Outcome 2: Information produced by the City is accessible to people of all ages and abilities. Action Timeline Resp 1.3 Investigate options to provide hard copies of the general rates and water and wastewater rates notices in large print and braille upon request. 2015 RS 1.4 Review rates payment methods currently available to identify any access barriers for seniors or people with disabilities. Review to specifically consider accessibility for customers with the following: 2015 RS 2014 WRM •• vision impairment •• hearing impairment •• intellectual disability or an acquired brain injury •• no internet access. 1.5 Provide large print and braille Waste and Recycling Calendars to residents upon request. Promote large print and braille versions of the Waste and Recycling Calendar via: •• printed messages on all calendars •• email or newsletter to the community •• a message on our Green GC website under the heading of 'Information for people with disabilities'. 20
  • 21. Outcome 2 (cont): Action Timeline Resp 1.6 Ongoing review and amendment to our Brand and Communication Guides and Signage Masterplan undertaken in consultation with the Social Development and Community Safety Branch to ensure consistency with the intent of the Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act 1992. 2013 CC 1.7 Investigate Communication Guides amendments to require the inclusion of a standard statement at the bottom of all CCs that would refer to the various alternate formats in which information can be provided. 2013 CC 1.8 Provide information to staff regarding the production and use of accessible print, media and web information to raise awareness of accessibility issues. 2013 CC Outcome 3: Our Tourist Parks are inclusive and accessible to people of all ages and abilities. Action Timeline Resp 1.9 Establish an online booking system for accessible cabins. 2015 TP 1.10 Review Tourist Park maps to include more information for people with limited mobility. For example, adding icons to show the location of accessible parking, pathways, entrances, amenities and cabins. 2013 TP 1.11 Progressively provide information on accessible cabins, including descriptions of access and images on the Tourist Parks website, under a heading of 'Accessible Accommodation' on the home page. Ongoing TP 1.12 Utilise the Access Guidelines for Tourist Parks in all City Tourist Park developments. Ongoing TP 1.13 Include access provisions consistent with the intent of the Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act 1992 and relevant Australian Standards in all specifications for the design of Tourist Park amenities and facilities. Ongoing TP 21
  • 22. Outcome 4: Disaster management planning information includes and is accessible to people of all ages and abilities. Action Timeline Resp 1.14 Undertake a review of the hard-copy, electronic plans and information on our web page to ensure that information on evacuation and how to prepare and respond in a disaster event is available and accessible for everyone. 2015 DMU 1.15 Ensure all information, including accessible options for contacting the hotline and disaster preparedness specific to people with disabilities, is printed in community resources and located on the City’s disaster management webpage under the heading of 'Information for people with disabilities'. 2013 DMU Ongoing DMU 2013 DMU Ongoing DMU Audio and hard-copy versions are available in large print and braille upon request, and these options and the contact for requesting these is included on all versions. 1.16 Our Disaster Management Unit (DMU) to provide free training, resources and information to community groups, such as Neighbourhood Watch to enable these groups to raise awareness and work on disaster preparedness in their local communities. 1.17 The DMU to work with the Social Development and Community Safety Branch and the community to: •• raise awareness of the need for everyone to be prepared for disasters •• review our disaster management information and planning to ensure that it is accessible to everyone; specifically seniors and people with disabilities. 1.18 The DMU to work with local agencies to raise awareness about disasters and the need for preparedness. Agencies targeted are those who work alongside people who are often the most vulnerable in a disaster event, including: •• people living in aged care facilities •• older people living alone •• people who are homeless •• people with disabilities, including mental illness. 22
  • 23. Outcome 5: Communication and information systems are accessible and useable. Action Timeline Resp 1.19 In the project planning phase for all new Information and Communications Technology and online services, include a requirement to meet the intent of the Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act 1992. Ongoing PMO 1.20 Engage a suitably qualified and experienced access advisor in the early planning stages of new Information and Communications Technology to provide advice on the accessibility of systems, and to ensure consistency with the intent of Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act 1992. Incorporate testing by users with a range of disabilities in the project methodology. Ongoing PMO Outcome 6: People can easily find information and contacts for community and City services. Action Timeline Resp 1.21 Enhance and promote social media platforms to residents via direct mail (Mayor’s Message in rates notices) to engage more followers on Facebook and Twitter. 2013 CC 1.22 Assist Councillors to prepare local newsletter articles and comments with content specifically targeted to seniors. 2013 CC 1.23 Use on-hold messages, City of Gold Coast website and advertising for particular projects to inform the community of current City programs and information, including how to access and request alternative formats of information. 2013 CC Ongoing SD&CS 2013 SD&CS 1.24 Provide information on accessible facilities, activities and services to support seniors and people with a disability in the Gold Coast by making the information currently contained in the Community Resources Directories, 'Assisting Seniors' and 'Assisting People with Disabilities', freely available and easily accessible. 1.25 Centralise information regarding City rates and water and wastewater rate payments and enquiries through the inclusion of web links to the Community web pages for seniors and people with disabilities. 23
  • 24. Outcome 7: Access information is available on our website Action 1.26 Review and update the Gold Coast Access web page which identifies the accessibility of key facilities, including: •• parks •• community centres •• libraries •• toilets, and •• accessible tourist accommodation and entertainment facilities. Photographer John Mills 24 Timeline Resp 2014 SC&CS
  • 25. Outcome 8: Attachments on our website are accessible to everyone. Action Timeline Resp 1.27 Investigate and implement as viable, PDF alternatives, such as MS Word versions, to facilitate access for people using screen reading software to documents on our website. 2014 CD 1.28 Collaborate with officers from across the organisation to undertake the Customer Orientated Business Improvement (COBI) project to improve customer experience when dealing with us. 2013 HR&LS 1.29 Commence and continue to implement where viable the provision of smart forms, to enable community members to complete and submit forms online. 2014 HR&LS HR&LS Outcome 9: People of all ages and abilities can participate in training provided by the City. Action 1.30 Include information about the accessibility of training venues in invitations, and a message encouraging participants to notify organisers of any accessibility requirements they may have. Timeline Resp 2013 HR&LS Outcome 10: Eligible seniors and people with disabilities can access an assisted bin service. Action Timeline Resp 1.31 Continue to provide assistance to eligible seniors and people with disabilities to empty their waste and recycling bins. Ongoing W&RM 1.32 Promote the assisted bin service (subject to eligibility) on all printed calendars, and on our Green GC website under the heading of 'Information for people with disabilities'. 2014 W&RM 25
  • 26. Outcome 11: Pensioners can pay less for their rates. Action Timeline Resp 1.33 Continue to offer pensioner rate concessions and rate deferral options for eligible residents, subject to annual City endorsement. Ongoing RS Outcome 12: Our water services are accessible and inclusive to people of all ages and abilities. Action Timeline Resp 1.34 Identify and assess Gold Coast Water high risk customers (e.g. people on dialysis) and ensure appropriate processes and procedures are in place to meet their needs in the event of water outage. 2013 GCW (Operational Performance) 1.35 Review Gold Coast Water incident management framework to ensure accessibility issues are addressed and appropriate actions are taken to ensure effective communication, identification and inclusion for all. 2013 GCW (Operational Performance) 1.36 Review Gold Coast Water community partnership and education programs to ensure accessibility issues are considered. 2013 GCW (Operational Performance) Outcome 13: The community can easily find out which immunisation services are at accessible locations. Action 1.37 Audit immunisation service centres to identify the level of accessibility at each location. Resp 2014 HR&LS 2016 HR&LS Update printed and online service information to include information about the accessibility of each site. 1.38 Relocate immunisation services provided from City vans to accessible immunisation centres. 26 Timeline
  • 27. Outcome 14: Residents who are unable to maintain their nature strip, due to age or disability, can apply to the City for mowing assistance. Action Timeline Resp 1.39 Continue to provide mowing assistance for road reserve areas fronting residential properties, to eligible residents who are aged or have a disability. Ongoing P&RS Promote the availability of this service to eligible residents on the Parks website under the heading of 'Information for people with a disability'. Outcome 15: The community is informed about access for people with disabilities at transfer stations. Action Timeline Resp 1.40 Undertake a progressive review of all transfer stations to identify accessible areas, and install accessible signage to indicate areas which offer the easiest access for someone with a disability e.g. points where there may be step free access, handrails and wider parking bays. 2014 W&RM 1.41 Progressive listing of transfer station locations and accessible features, including images on our Green GC website under the heading of 'Information for people with disabilities'. 2014 W&RM 27
  • 28. Priority Area 2: Customer contact and community engagement What we are doing We are proud of our dedicated customer contact centres which are staffed with friendly, trained professionals. We recognise that different people want to engage with us in different ways and various methods of contact are listed on our home page, including email, phone, National Relay Service, translation and interpretation service and in person. We strive for excellence in customer service, and in order to enhance customer contact and community engagement we have implemented a Customer Contact Strategy. There are four main portals for customer contact: •• face to face (at customer service points, through Councillors, field officers, rangers, lifeguards, home/site visits, community events, etc.) •• telephone (including telephone contact centres) •• correspondence (including mail, e-mail, fax and SMS) •• web based/Internet. While current approaches to 'face to face' customer contact are very effective, other aspects will be improved. The City is working to remove the barriers that prevent some people from participating in key decision-making processes. We do this by providing a range of comment and feedback options for community consultation. What the community said they want us to do Suggestions for improving customer contact and community engagement included: •• proactively engaging people with disabilities, especially on our major projects •• establish a 'one-stop shop' to provide easy access to information, and simple options for providing feedback on a range of important facilities such as parking, footpaths, road crossings, driveways, buildings, parks and playgrounds, bus stops, printed information and online information •• enhance partnerships and improve networks between the City and people with a disability to increase opportunities for information sharing and consultation. 28
  • 29. What are our key actions? Action: Review the Community Consultation Policy and associated processes, to ensure they meet our obligations under anti-discrimination legislation and are consistent with the intent of the Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act 1992. (Refer to Action 2.2.) What does this mean for me? I can easily have a say in City decision-making. Action: Audit all customer service areas of City Administration Centres, including the building and communication systems, to identify any access barriers, and actions for progressively improving access. (Refer to Action 2.5.) I can easily access Administration Centres and customer services. Action: Develop a contact list for community members to report concerns and provide feedback in relation to disability access for City infrastructure and services. (Refer to Action 2.8.) I know who to contact when I encounter access issues. 29
  • 30. I have always loved the beach and I have never been able to access it. I am pleased to see that Council has installed a beach access pathway at the Broadwater Parklands and it is wonderful to be able to go down with my family and sit on the beach in my own scooter or wheelchair. I hope to see more of this on other beaches around the Gold Coast in the future. Sharon Morris
  • 31. We will progressively improve access and inclusion to our services and information through the following actions. Outcome 1: People of all ages and abilities can participate in community engagement activities. Action Timeline 2014 MP Timeline 2.1 During preparation for major City projects, facilitate equitable access in engagement with the community by: Resp Resp 2013 CP&P •• utilising the Event Accessibility Checklist, produced by the Australian Network on Disability for planning and setup www.and.org.au/pages/event-checklist.html. •• following the Guidelines for Producing Readable Text by Vision Australia www.visionaustralia.org/info.aspx?page=1845 •• including access information and a message on all invitations to encourage participants to notify organisers of any accessibility requirements they may have •• providing the above information and resources to consultants conducting engagement on behalf of Major Projects. Outcome 2: Community engagement processes are accessible and inclusive. Action 2.2 Review our Community Consultation Policy and associated processes, to ensure they meet our obligations under anti-discrimination legislation and are consistent with the intent of the Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act 1992. Key Resp Responsibility CC Customer Contact CP&P Corporate Planning and Performance IS Information Services MP Major Projects PS Property Services RS Revenue Services SD&CS Social Development and Community Safety 31
  • 32. Outcome 3: Our customer services are accessible and inclusive to people of all ages and abilities. Action Timeline Resp 2.3 List the various ways in which community members can contact the City on our website homepage, and in any relevant publications. 2014 CC 2.4 Review our online computer telephony options to identify opportunities for increasing accessibility for people with disabilities. The review will include functions such as: 2015 CC 2.5 Progressively audit all customer service areas of our Administration Centres, including the building and communication systems, to identify any access barriers, and actions for progressively improving access. Ongoing PS 2.6 Continue to provide the following in customer service areas of City Administration Centres: Ongoing •• bill payments •• form lodgements •• service requests •• making complaints. •• lower height customer counter areas for customers and staff with disabilities •• customer seating for people waiting in line for service •• display information via counter cards or stickers to encourage customers to notify staff if they require assistance •• signage to indicate availability and location of hearing loops. 32 CC CC
  • 33. Action 2.7 Update web page information regarding rates and water and wastewater payments and enquiries, including rate concession and deferral options, to highlight the following accessible options for contacting us: Timeline Resp 2014 RS 2014 SD&CS •• Translation and Interpretation Service (TIS) •• National Relay Service •• email. Provide concession and rate remission online application forms in PDF and Microsoft Word to ensure accessibility for customers using screen reading software. 2.8 Develop a contact list for community members to report concerns or provide feedback in relation to the accessibility of: •• parking •• footpaths •• road crossings •• driveways •• buildings •• parks and playgrounds •• bus stops •• printed information •• online information. 33
  • 34. Outcome 4: Accessible emergency procedures are in place at all City staff and customer premises. Action Timeline Resp 2016 PS 2.10 Conduct an annual audit of staff work locations, to ensure that all employees who require assistance in the event of an emergency evacuation have a Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan in place. Ongoing PS 2.11 Review and update emergency evacuation procedures after every evacuation event (including evacuation exercises). Ongoing PS 2.9 Review all City buildings to incorporate both audible and visible emergency information systems for people with vision and hearing impairment, such as: •• visual cues including easy-to-read text on screens, clear concise signage, visible emergency alarms •• clear, easy-to-understand audible announcements with specific instructions, to assist people with vision impairment •• use of international symbols in signage to assist people with an intellectual disability or people who cannot read. Outcome 5: We communicate and share information regularly with community service providers, advocacy and support groups and the general community. Action Timeline Resp 2.12 Continue to produce and distribute an eNewsletter to community groups and service providers sharing information on our projects and events, opportunities for community involvement and feedback, and available community grants. Ongoing SD&CS 34
  • 35. 35
  • 36. Priority Area 3: City buildings, community facilities and recreational facilities What we are doing We are working to progressively improve access and inclusion to our buildings, community facilities and recreational facilities for residents and visitors alike. A key recreational asset is the Gold Coast Oceanway, which seeks to make sections of the city’s surf beaches accessible to the whole community. We are also developing recreational facilities for people of all abilities. Our commitment to best practice in this area has received public recognition by disability organisations, access consultants and the State Government. Our highly awarded All Abilities Playground and "Changing Places" accessible change facility at Kurrawa /Pratten Park, Broadbeach (partly funded by the State Government) is a much loved example of the benefits to the community from the City delivering best practice in accessibility. This facility includes a height adjustable change bench and tracking hoist system, which caters to children and adults with a disability. The facility is available to parents, carers, groups and visitors to the city via the Master Locksmith Access Key (MLAK) system. At Southport Broadwater Parklands, access to the beach, showers and toilets, the pontoon and outdoor stage have all been planned with accessibility in mind. Further improvements to accessibility include: •• low height counters at Administration Centres •• provision of a special needs library in Nerang •• provision of mobile library services and house bound service •• new library and community precincts with exceptional accessibility features, e.g. the Upper Coomera Community Hub and Helensvale Community and Cultural Centre •• provision of a FINA (International Swimming Federation) compliant access ramp at the 50 metre pool at Palm Beach - one of the first FINA compliant pools with an access ramp in Australia. 36
  • 37. Since the opening of Sports House as a fully accessible sports facility almost two years ago, the one major thing that has astounded me is the obvious demand for fully inclusive and accessible places for participants with a disability to undertake recreational activities. Nearly all of the sports clubs based at Sports House now have a disability program, which have all gone from strength to strength and are continuously growing in numbers. Whilst seeing the disabled members out on the water is inspiring, its seeing these members back on land that is the exciting part. They are treated as any other member of the club would be treated and are growing genuine friendships with their club mates. This has seen once shy kids becoming confident, and this is showing whilst competing on the water, as all the disabled members are developing at an incredible rate. It’s a true credit to both the club and the members, and a joy to watch. Dale Salmon, Manager — Sports House at Varsity Lakes
  • 38. What the community and staff said they want us to do Stakeholders recommended a number of initiatives to further enhance visitor and community experience of the Gold Coast as a city with high levels of access and inclusion. These include: •• implement the full range of accessibility features for footpaths and building entrances, within buildings and at facilities such as theatres, stadiums, pools and parks •• integrate better signage, including braille signage, in building and precinct design wherever possible •• create more accessible car parking, self-opening doors, wider corridors and other accessible building features •• incorporate best practice principles into the design of paths of travel to improve access for people in wheelchairs, those with mobility aids and people pushing prams •• create more accessible beach access points. Key Resp Responsibility CV&S ES Executive Services LS&CD Library Services and Cultural Development P&RS Parks and Recreational Services PS Property Services SC&CS Social Development and Community Safety W&RM 38 Community Venues and Services Waste and Resources Management
  • 39. What are our key actions? What does this mean for me? Action: Continue to provide information and services at all branch libraries for people with disabilities and older people, including special needs library collection, mobile and house-bound service, assistive and adaptive equipment and free meeting room space for not-for-profit/support group meetings. (Refer to Action 3.2.) I can access a large range of library resources and books in a format that I can read. Action: Implement the city-wide 'Public Toilet Refurbishment Program' to improve the accessibility and safety of public amenities. Regular updates on accessible facilities will be provided to the online 'National Public Toilet Map' (toiletmap.gov.au/). (Refer to Action 3.17.) I can access and locate accessible public toilets easily. Action: Provide a list of playgrounds, under the heading of 'Information for people with a disability' on the Parks website, of all accessible playgrounds which have border fencing and nearby accessible toilets, car parking and connecting pathways. (Refer to Action 3.23.) I can easily plan outings, find recreation venues and locations that are accessible. Action: Incorporate ramp entry into City pools in standard design documentation for new and upgraded works for aquatic centres. (Refer to Action 3.27.) I can use the City’s pool facilities. 39
  • 40. We will progressively improve access and inclusion to our buildings, community facilities and recreational facilities through the following actions. Outcome 1: City libraries are accessible to people of all ages and abilities. Action Timeline Resp 3.1 Review existing access audits, or undertake audits for older branch libraries (where not previously audited), and progressively implement the recommendations as part of ongoing asset management planning. Ongoing LS&CD 3.2 Continue to provide information and services at all branch libraries for people with disabilities and older people including: Ongoing LS&CD 3.3 Review existing assistive and adaptive equipment and programs, and replace outdated items with more recent technology, to enhance the accessibility of systems for people with a disability. 2014 LS&CD 3.4 Investigate options for improving access to online information about branch libraries' services and programs specific to people with disabilities e.g. establishment of a central point / page which links to all relevant information. 2014 LS&CD 3.5 Develop further operational initiatives and programs in consultation with SD&CS Branch and people with disabilities, that specifically support people with disabilities e.g. story-telling with Auslan. Ongoing LS&CD 3.6 Increase awareness of the availability of the special needs library by promoting it to local families, special schools, disability agencies and networks. Examples may include an introductory letter to principals of schools with special education units, emails to disability agencies, website screensaver and message, and community newsletter articles. 2013 LS&CD •• special needs library collection at Nerang (majority of items available for reservation and collection at all branches) •• mobile and house-bound service — including the accessible mobile library •• assistive and adaptive equipment •• collections in a variety of formats •• free meeting room space for not-for-profit/support group meetings. 40 Enhance online access to the special needs collection by including images, to enable people to view and request items online.
  • 41. Photographer John Mills 41
  • 42. Outcome 2: Our facilities are accessible for people of all ages and abilities. Action Timeline Resp 3.7 Develop information about access and inclusion and provide it to all lessees of City-owned property via a mail-out or article in the Leasehold Newsletter. Ongoing PS 2015 PS Information is to include: •• awareness of the new Access to Premises Standards (Buildings) in relation to any upgrade or modification works •• obligations for lessees to ensure that people with disabilities have equitable dignified access. 3.8 Review lease agreements to determine if any alteration needs to occur to comply with anti-discrimination legislation. Outcome 3: The Arts Centre Gold Coast is accessible for people of all ages and abilities. Action Timeline Resp 3.9 Continue to implement the Arts Centre Disability Action/Management Plan and associated actions, including: Ongoing PS •• braille and tactile signage •• visible and audible fire alarms and emergency procedures that address the needs of all people. Outcome 4: Our private sector companies fulfil their obligations under anti-discrimination legislation. Action Timeline Resp 3.10 As part of the next round of renewals for City and Controlled Entities service level agreements, ensure all entities meet their legislative obligations under anti-discrimination legislation. Ongoing ES 42
  • 43. Photographer John Mills 43
  • 44. Outcome 5: Our community and staff buildings are inclusive and accessible to people of all ages and abilities. Action Timeline Resp 3.11 Investigate a Scooter Recharge Point and possible trial at one of the major branch library locations. Widely publicise the trial to the community via internet, email to community networks, signage in libraries and in relevant library resources. 2014 LS&CD 3.12 Ensure that information regarding the accessibility of the City’s individual branch libraries is available on our website. 2014 LS&CD 3.13 Continue to seek access advice from our Technical Disability Planner, or an accredited and suitably qualified Access Consultant, at the inception of projects involving community and staff buildings. Ongoing PS Ongoing PS The resulting advice is considered during the planning, construction and final approval stages of projects. 3.14 Continue to ensure that all tender documents and contracts for the design of new buildings and connecting infrastructure contain specific requirements for adherence to current standards for accessibility and best practice outcomes, where achievable, for the following elements: •• ramps and stairs •• emergency egress •• street furniture •• pathways •• way finding •• lighting •• communication systems (audio loops) •• customer service counters (lowered section for officers and customers with a disability) •• accessible parking •• access to buildings. 3.15 Ensure that all upgrades to existing City buildings continue to meet the requirements of the Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act 1992 and the Disability Access to Premises (Buildings) Standards (2010) and give due consideration to the design constraints of the building, and future plans for the site. 44 PS Ongoing
  • 45. Outcome 6: Public waste and recycling bins are accessible to everyone. Action 3.16 Investigate progressive replacement of the current standard height bins with accessible height bins, as part of routine asset management and replacement processes. Timeline Resp 2015 W&RM Timeline Resp 2017 P&RS 2013 P&RS Outcome 7: Accessible toilets and amenities are provided across the city. Action 3.17 Continue to implement the city-wide 'Public Toilet Refurbishment Program' to improve the accessibility and safety of public amenities. Promote the upgrades and new accessible facilities via regular updates to 'The National Public Toilet Map' www.toiletmap.gov.au 3.18 Investigate accessible tap operating systems in hand basins, in response to concerns raised by the community about the inaccessibility of the "push panels" currently used. Investigations to include: •• sensor systems, and •• short stem / flick lever taps. Outcome 8: Groups facilitating social outings for seniors and people with disabilities are assisted to access parks. Action Timeline Resp 3.19 a) Continue to provide park gate keys for free, to eligible organisations providing social and recreational outings for seniors and people with disabilities. (Keys enable vehicle access into the park, which assists people with limited mobility to access facilities including toilets and picnic areas). Ongoing P&RS b) Promote the availability of keys to eligible groups on the Parks website, under the heading of 'Information for people with a disability'. 45
  • 46. Outcome 9: The All Abilities Playground at Kurrawa provides a positive experience for people of all ages and abilities. Action 3.20 Engage with families and organisations who use the All Abilities Playground, and adult-sized change facility at Kurrawa, to find out what is working well and to identify improvements. Timeline Resp 2014 SD&CS P&RS Develop a plan for progressive improvement in response to feedback from the community. Outcome 10: Playgrounds offer access for children and adults of all ages and abilities. The community can easily locate fenced, accessible playgrounds. Action 3.21 Investigate and assess existing parks, to identify possible future 'All Abilities' playground sites, based on the model at Kurrawa and subsequent feedback from the community. 3.22 Continue to monitor and maintain playground equipment, and provide a timely response to requests from the community regarding potential issues and concerns about access. 46 Resp 2014 P&RS Ongoing P&RS 2014 P&RS Include a contact email and phone number on the Parks website under the heading of 'Information for people with a disability' for people to report concerns or provide feedback regarding the accessibility of parks and facilities. 3.23 Provide a list of playgrounds, under the heading of 'Information for people with a disability' on the Parks website, of all fenced, accessible playgrounds e.g. list playgrounds which have border fencing and nearby accessible toilets, car parking and connecting pathways. Timeline Promote the list via website, email and newsletter to disability and playgroup networks, special schools and community organisations.
  • 47. Outcome 11: The unique Gold Coast natural environment is accessible to people of all ages and abilities. Action 3.24 Investigate natural bushland / bushwalking areas to identify accessible areas and features. Timeline Resp 2014 P&RS Include details of these features, including photos, on the Gold Coast Access website and link to the Parks website under the heading 'Information for people with a disability'. Outcome 12: Plant choices in our parks and gardens consider the sensory experience of people with vision impairment Action 3.25 Review and amend the City 'Planting Guide' to incorporate more edible and fragrant plants in parks and gardens across the city. Timeline Resp 2014 P&RS 47
  • 48. 48
  • 49. Outcome 13: City-owned aquatic centres and community centres are welcoming, accessible and inclusive of people of all ages and abilities. Action Timeline Resp 2015 CV&S 3.27 Incorporate ramp entry into pool in standard design documentation for new and upgraded works for aquatic centres. 2015 CV&S 3.28 Progressively incorporate accessibility upgrade priorities in the annual review of asset management plans for aquatic centres and community centres, allowing targeted investment across our asset base. Ongoing CV&S 2015 CV&S 3.26 List information regarding the accessibility of each aquatic centre and community facility on our website and printed material. Information may include a description of: •• accessible parking •• front entrance •• entry to main pool •• access to change room •• change facilities •• accessible toilets •• pool chairs Identify access issues in the older facilities and planning for improvements over time — as budget and resources allow. Engage the community to provide feedback on access issues and to assist with prioritising works. 3.29 Achieve full compliance with Australian Disability Standards for the new community centres at Upper Coomera and Helensvale and incorporate accessibility enhancements to meet the intent of disability discrimination legislation in relation to the following: •• internal fit out •• egress/ stair refuges (Helensvale) •• way finding principles (Helensvale) •• set down areas. 49
  • 50. Priority Area 4: Pedestrian environments, public transport infrastructure and car parking What we are doing We would like residents and visitors to be able to get around the city easily, safely and efficiently. In order to achieve this goal, we are working to progressively improve access and inclusion to our pedestrian environments, public transport infrastructure and car parking. Whether it’s getting around the city by bus, car or foot, a number of initiatives are planned to help make it easier for older people or people with a disability. This includes our planned improvements in the provision of low-cost or free accessible transport; planning for more convenient, compliant and sufficient accessible parking; and ensuring that people can move seamlessly throughout the city via connected, accessible pathways. Our design processes also ensure accessibility is an integral consideration. This means new City assets comply with the Australian Disability Standards and best practice specifications wherever possible. What the community said they want us to do Stakeholders provided a number of suggestions on how to improve accessibility for people moving throughout the city. These included: •• improve public transport infrastructure, with better design for access and safety •• better information with improved timetables and accessibility information to help journey planning •• public transport operators, including cab drivers, be made aware of the needs of passengers with disabilities, and the needs of older people and carers travelling with young children •• improve footpaths and pathways, including creating wider paths, better gradients and improved surfaces •• footpaths be monitored to ensure they are free of clutter and obstacles •• provide more information about accessibility and 'way finding' aids (signage, standard designs and features, tactile surface indicators and audio aids at signalised crossings) •• adopt a more consistent approach to the provision of adequate accessible parking and improve enforcement activities to ensure proper use of accessible bays. 50
  • 51. What are our key actions? What does this mean for me? Action: Investigate and implement free off-peak public transport for seniors. (Refer to Action 4.4.) I will have more opportunity to get out and about and access the services I need. Action: Establish a program for identifying and upgrading all City-owned, non-compliant kerb ramps and footpaths associated with road crossings, to meet Australian Disability Standards. (Refer to Action 4.16.) There will be more locations where I feel safe crossing the road. Action: Develop a City Parking Strategy which will assess disability parking needs of the city and maximise utilisation of disability parking bays. A parking bay audit will be undertaken of the city including disability parking bays. Locations of parking bays will be included on our website - Where to Park on the Gold Coast. (Refer to Action 4.8.) Accessible parking bays are available in convenient locations and I can easily find out where to park. Action: Implement the City Bus Stop Upgrade Program, in accordance with the requirements of the Disability Standards for Accessible Public Transport (2002) by 2022. List the locations of all Disability Standards for Accessible Public Transport (2002) compliant bus stops on our website, including images, and a contact for reporting any access issues or damage to bus stops. (Refer to Actions 4.29 and 4.30.) I have improved access to public transport. 51
  • 52. We will progressively improve access and inclusion to its pedestrian environments, public transport infrastructure and car parking through the following actions. Outcome 1: Older people and people with a disability can access or find out about low cost, or free, accessible transport. Action Timeline Resp 4.1 Provide information on community transport providers in the Community Resources Directories and on the City’s Gold Coast Access website. Ongoing SD&CS 4.2 Review and expand coverage, frequency, and alternate shopping/ activity destinations of the existing City Cab program to include areas with high need where appropriate. Ongoing CT 4.3 Develop and provide public and community transport information in hardcopy and online; including accessibility features of each service for people with restricted mobility, e.g. prams, wheelchairs, walking aids, and confirmation of an appropriate and accessible footpath between destinations and transport stops. Ongoing CT 2014 CT Maps that are included with promotional material for public and community transport services are updated to show the locations of stops along the route. 4.4 Investigate and implement free off-peak public transport for seniors. Key Resp Responsibility AB Assets Branch CAM Corporate Asset Management CD City Development CP City Planning CT City Transport DB Design Branch HR&LS Health, Regulatory and Lifeguard Services M Maintenance MP Major Projects SD&CS Social Development and Community Safety T Traffic 52
  • 53. Outcome 2: Convenient, compliant and sufficient accessible parking is available throughout the Gold Coast. Action Timeline Resp 4.5 Investigate the potential to apply new parking management technology to assist with compliance relating to disability parking bay use. Ongoing HR&LS 4.6 Collaborate with City Transport branch to advocate parking compliance within the community through an educational program on the appropriate use of disability parking bays. Ongoing HR&LS 4.7 Advocate parking compliance with government agencies including Queensland Police and Queensland Department of Transport. Ongoing HR&LS 2014 CT 4.8 Develop a City Parking Strategy which achieves the following: •• review all relevant town planning requirements, the City Transport Plan, and relevant codes and standards to ensure consistency in requirements of supply of accessible bays at a minimum of 3 per cent •• assess on and off-street accessible parking needs in high use areas including activity centres and health service precincts, for increased provision (up to 6 per cent) •• provide guidance on locating and designing accessible parking bays for development •• provide recommendations on the implementation of Parking Strategy initiatives in our Planning Scheme, Car Parking, Access and Transport Integration constraint code •• provide opportunity for feedback from the community regarding accessible parking and progressively implement endorsed recommendations •• assess disability parking needs of the city and maximise utilisation of disability parking bays with the provision of easy access information and real time information on disability parking information •• request State Government review of the Australian Disability Parking Scheme to minimise illegal or misuse of accessible parking bays (e.g. include photo identity on permits) •• explore options include provision of contact email/SMS to enable reporting of alleged misuse of parking bays •• undertake a parking bay audit of the city including disability parking bays and include information on the City’s website - Where to Park on the Gold Coast. 53
  • 54. Outcome 3: People of all ages and abilities can move seamlessly throughout the city via connected, accessible pathways. Action Timeline Resp 4.9 Repair paths of travel (i.e. pedestrian connections) in response to community requests and annual inspections, to provide improved access as part of the disability access capital works program. Ongoing AB 4.10 Ensure all planning and design activities address accessibility considerations and are undertaken in accordance with legislative obligations under the Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act 1992 and the agreed functional design specifications (asset class acceptance criteria, where available). Incorporate opportunities for increased accessibility beyond "deemed to satisfy" requirements, considering overall functionality for all users. Ongoing DB 4.11 Provide input to the City Solicitors Branch Local Law Review processes with a view to highlighting the benefits of clear, accessible paths of travel for footpath users of all ages and abilities, as consistent with the requirements of Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act 1992. ongoing HR&LS 4.12 Provide feedback to Planning, Environment and Transport (PE&T) regarding concerns expressed by residents about access for wheelchairs from driveways onto the road. ongoing HR&LS 4.13 Update all Standard Operation Procedures including checklists, to ensure accessibility issues are considered to the extent permitted under legislation in the licensing and permit approval assessment process. e.g. roadside dining activities. 2013 HR&LS 4.14 Facilitate the incorporation of standard drawings for kerb ramps (ramped pedestrian crossings) issued by the Institute of Public Works Engineering Australia Queensland in the Land Development Guidelines, for consistent use across the organisation. 2015 CP 54 CD
  • 55. I am an extremely outgoing person. Without inclusiveness and accessibility, quite simply I would be stuck inside my home and I wouldn’t be able to work or enjoy the things that others enjoy! Savyy Hunt
  • 56. Outcome 4: The design and construction of our City assets comply with Australian Disability Standards and best practice specifications where possible. Action Timeline Resp 4.15 Develop an Asset Class Acceptance Criteria to ensure assets are delivered in compliance with the Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act 1992. 2013 AB 4.16 Establish a program for identifying and upgrading all City-owned, noncompliant kerb ramps and footpaths associated with road crossings, to meet Australian Disability Standards. 2013 AB 4.17 As part of the review of the Asset Custodian Policy, include the following responsibility of Asset Custodians: 2013 CAM 4.18 Update the Levels of Service section of the Asset Management Plan Template to include 'Accessibility' as a service component to be considered by Asset Custodians when specifying levels of services. 2013 CAM 4.19 Develop best practice technical guidelines to inform the City’s asset custodians about key elements of accessibility including: 2014 SD&CS 'Comply with the Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act 1992 and Equitable Access Policy for all assets, and develop plans to achieve compliance over time for existing assets, and develop management plans for existing assets where compliance is not achievable.' •• ramps and stairs •• emergency egress •• street furniture •• pathways •• way finding •• lighting. 56
  • 57. Outcome 4 (cont): The design and construction of our City assets comply with Australian Disability Standards and best practice specifications where possible. Action Timeline Resp 4.20 Maintain clear, accessible paths of travel for people with disabilities, as part of routine maintenance services, and respond to requests from the community regarding maintenance concerns related to access. Ongoing M 4.21 Incorporate in design briefs to Design Branch, scope to include the provisions of the Australian Disability Standards for all new and upgraded installations of: Ongoing T Ongoing T Ongoing CT •• pathways and kerb ramps to AS1428.1 (2009) •• tactile ground surface indicators to AS1428.4.1 (2009) •• car parking to AS2890.6 (2009). And wherever possible: •• pedestrian kerb ramps at a minimum width of 1200mm •• pedestrian pathways at a minimum width of 1800mm. 4.22 Continue to investigate and rectify access issues at road crossings to provide pedestrian refuges at appropriate locations on roadways as reported by community members. Promote the relevant contact on the City of Gold Coast web page for residents to report concerns about traffic facilities e.g. signage, line marking and pedestrian safety. 4.23 Investigate and rectify insufficient timing at signalised crossings as reported by community members. Promote relevant contact information on our web page for residents to report concerns about transport infrastructure. 57
  • 58. 58
  • 59. Outcome 5: New City assets comply with Australian Disability Standards. Action Timeline Resp 4.24 Ensure that the planning and design of new municipal infrastructure that is delivered, meets our obligations under anti-discrimination legislation and complies with relevant Australian Disability Standards. Ongoing MP AB Outcome 6: We are an active advocate for accessible public transport services and information. Action Timeline Resp 4.25 Advocate to state and private bus operators in Gold Coast City to: Ongoing CT •• confirm timeline for when Gold Coast bus fleet will be accessible •• confirm options and timeframe to deliver accessible information on bus stop and bus service accessibility •• confirm options and timeframe to deliver appropriate information on bus stop/station accessibility e.g. stops are on steep sites and the next nearest accessible bus stop •• address bus stop locations that do not have a safe, convenient and accessible pedestrian crossing point •• investigate improved wheelchair stability/safety on buses •• investigate opportunities for audible and visual 'real time' travel information for all buses and bus stops •• provide training for bus drivers regarding access and inclusion, including driver attitude, driving style and understanding of barriers to access for people with disabilities, including people using assistance animals •• investigate new technology to communicate public transport accessibility information. 59
  • 60. Outcome 7: Our planning and design work demonstrates leadership in access and inclusion. Action Timeline Resp 4.26 Ensure that the planning and design stages of all major transport projects consider impacts on access and inclusion. Ongoing CT Ongoing CT 2015 CT Consider access issues in the early concept planning phase, including the location of services and facilities (e.g. libraries, community centres, health services etc.) and access for people who do not drive. 4.27 Prioritise planning and provision of accessibility upgrades for transport infrastructure to allow for progressive improvement and inform our annual Capital Works program (e.g. footpath upgrades, intersection upgrades, increased accessible parking etc.). 4.28 Provide a map showing footpath locations on our website. Outcome 8: Bus stops are well connected and accessible to people of all ages and abilities. Action Timeline Resp 4.29 Implement the City Bus Stop Upgrade Program, in accordance with the requirements of the Disability Standards for Accessible Public Transport (2002) by 2022. Ongoing CT 4.30 List the locations of all Disability Standards for Accessible Public Transport (2002) compliant bus stops on our website, including images, and a contact for reporting any access issues or damage to bus stops. 2018 CT 60
  • 61. 61
  • 62. Priority Area 5: Planning and development What we are doing Creating an environment where all people feel welcome, and a city that is accessible and can be enjoyed by all, is one of the City’s key priorities. We recognise that the best results are achieved when the whole community is engaged in planning for the future, and we want to encourage all residents to be actively engaged in shaping the decisions that will impact on the city now and in the future. We are working to improve accessibility through planning and development processes and allowing opportunities for involvement from the whole community. This includes ensuring that the planning scheme document and its review process are accessible online to all members of the community; development decisions are informed by requirements of accessibility; fast tracking the assessment of development applications for affordable housing and project owners and managers are informed of their obligations under anti-discrimination legislation. What the community said they want us to do Stakeholders identified the need for more accessible development to be delivered throughout the city. Suggestions to achieve this include: •• increasing awareness of best practice planning and design principles through the provision of supporting information and guidelines, training and compliance •• increase awareness and understanding of legislation governing built environment outcomes •• increase opportunities to contribute to strategic planning and design processes for major projects •• extend the higher standards of accessibility being achieved in public buildings and facilities to the private and commercial sectors, e.g. shopping centre and commercial complexes could improve access and movement by better coordinating the design of essential features such as parking areas, bus stops, drop-off and taxi zones •• increase provision of affordable, adaptable and accessible housing •• increase awareness and promotion of the economic benefits of inclusive and equitable access. It should be noted that the City’s ability to influence some of these matters is limited to our role as assessment manager in the development assessment process and advocacy opportunities as they arise. 62
  • 63. What are our key actions? What does this mean for me? Action: Enhance physical access for members of the community of all ages and abilities in all Centre Improvement Program streetscape improvement projects. (Refer to Action 5.2.) My local business centres are more pedestrian friendly and make it easy for me to move around and access the businesses I need. Action: Develop awareness within the building and construction industries about incorporating access requirements into buildings and new developments. (Refer to Action 5.17.) I will have access to more buildings and places in the city. Action: Fast track assessment for affordable and appropriate universally designed housing proposals from not-for-profit housing providers. (Refer to Action 5.19.) I have more housing choice to meet my diverse needs. Key Resp Responsibility AB Assets Branch CD City Development CP City Planning CP&P Corporate Planning and Performance HR&LS Health, Regulatory and Lifeguard Services LS&CD Library Services and Cultural Development MP Major Projects P&RS Parks and Recreational Services SC&CS Social Development and Community Safety 63
  • 64. The City will progressively improve access and inclusion in its planning and development assessment processes through the following actions. Outcome 1: Our planning and design work demonstrates leadership in access and inclusion. Action Timeline Resp 5.1 Ensure our Technical Planner (Disability), or suitably qualified and experienced access consultant, continues to be engaged during the early planning stages of all major new, upgrade and renewal projects to provide advice regarding access and inclusion. Ongoing LS&CD MP P&RS AB CD 5.2 Consider opportunities for enhancing physical access for members of the community of all ages and abilities in all Centre Improvement Program streetscape improvement projects. Ongoing CD 5.3 Ensure all contributed assets are built to comply with Disability Standards made under the Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act 1992. Ongoing CD 2013 CD 5.5 Building Certification officers to provide a service which ensures compliance with the Building Code of Australia/ National Construction Code and the Disability (Access to Premises — Buildings) Standards 2010 and all associated Australian Standards Ongoing HR&LS 5.6 Review all building certification application, assessment (including checklists) and approval documents to ensure accessibility issues are considered in the Building Certification assessment process. 2013 HR&LS Ongoing HR&LS 5.4 Review the City’s Open Space Management Guidelines and associated documents (Activity Specification for Generic Open Space Management Plan) to consider the City’s obligation under the Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act 1992. 5.7 Include Social Development and Community Services Branch as an internal referral service for Building Applications as appropriate. 64
  • 65. I look forward to being able to take my family, especially my granddaughters, to the Southport Broadwater Parkland Rockpools when they next come to see me as we know we can access almost everything in that park. I really want to have a great day out with them and be a part of the fun. All I want out of my life is to be treated with respect and be a Mum and a Nanna to my grandchildren and enjoy going "out" with my family with no hassles or barriers. Josie
  • 66. Outcome 2: The planning scheme document and its review process is accessible to all members of the community. Action Timeline Resp 5.8 Upload PDF alternatives, such as MS Word versions, for all planning scheme documents on our website to facilitate access for people using screen reading software. Ongoing CP 5.9 Minimise accessibility barriers for people with vision impairment, in the development of the planning scheme website, to comply with level AA of the World Wide Web Consortium Accessibility Guidelines (WACG 2.0), where it does not significantly impact on the timing and cost of the Gold Coast Planning Scheme review. Ongoing CP 5.10 List the various ways that community members can contact us on our planning scheme website and in our publications. Methods of contact will include: Ongoing CP •• email •• phone •• National Relay Service •• Translation and Interpretation Service •• in person (web link to list of accessible customer service locations). Outcome 3: Project owners and managers meet their obligations under anti-discrimination legislation. Action 5.11 Amend the Corporate Governance Framework and Corporate Activity Framework to include the requirement for all projects to consider accessibility obligations as part of project planning and implementation (including compliance with relevant anti-discrimination legislation). 66 Timeline Resp 2014 CP&P
  • 67. Outcome 4: Development decisions are informed by principles of access and inclusion. Action 5.12 Develop Equitable Access Guidelines for implementation in the Development Assessment process to inform good access outcomes in new developments. The guidelines will contain information about: Timeline Resp 2014 SD&CS 2015 SD&CS •• the economic and social benefits of accessibility •• good development outcomes (existing examples) •• contacts and resources for further information and advice. 5.13 Collaborate with City Planning Branch officers to develop a Social Health and Impact Assessment Code for implementation in our new planning scheme. Ongoing SD&CS 5.14 Raise awareness across City branches of the availability of our in-house Accredited Technical Access Officer for advice about compliance of new and existing assets, service delivery, and management plans, under the requirements of the Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act 1992, Building Code of Australia/National Construction Code, the Disability (access to Premises - Buildings) Standards 2009 and all associated Australian Standards. 2013 CD Ongoing CD Ongoing 5.17 Develop awareness within the building and construction industries about incorporating the access requirements into buildings and new developments: CD 5.15 Implement a set of standard advisory notes in development approvals to ensure new developments are Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act 1992 compliant for public land not within the road reserve. 5.16 Continue to implement AustROADS (a road design manual) in the assessment of development applications. •• incorporate design requirements in accordance with legislative frameworks e.g. AS1428 in the Building Code of Australia applicable to building applications •• advise the development industry of their responsibilities in meeting Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act 1992 requirements and opportunities created by more accessible development •• conduct inspections on building compliance and investigate building complaints •• provide a copy of the Australian Human Rights Commission's Missed business — How to attract more customers to your business by offering better access to your business to members of the development industry •• include relevant information in City Development Industry newsletters. 67
  • 68. Accessible Common Areas at Horizon Housing’s Bowden Court Project Horizon Housing’s Accessible Share House, Eko:Bode 68
  • 69. Outcome 4 (cont): Action 5.18 Implement the Equitable Access Guidelines in the development assessment process. Timeline Resp 2015 CD Outcome 5: Affordable and appropriate universally designed housing is promoted in the Gold Coast. Action Timeline Resp 5.19 Fast track assessment for affordable and appropriate universally designed housing proposals from not-for-profit housing providers. Ongoing CD Outcome 6: Attachments on our town planning website are accessible to everyone. Action Timeline Resp 5.20 Upload PDF alternatives, such as MS Word versions, to facilitate access for people using screen reading software to all City Development documents on our website. 2013 CD 5.21 Collaborate with officers from other directorates to undertake the Customer Orientated Business Improvement (COBI) project to improve customer access to planning enquiries and lodgement of applications and complaints. 2013 CD 5.22 Implement eDA for all application types. 2018 CD 69
  • 70. Priority Area 6: Tourism and events What we are doing The Gold Coast hosts an estimated 4.2 million visitors every year. They come to enjoy the region’s attractions and the year-round program of city-wide and community-based events. Tourism is a huge economic driver for the city, and we are working to ensure that attractions and events are accessible and inclusive to support a prosperous and sustainable tourism industry and allow our residents to actively participate in the cultural life of this diverse and vibrant city. This includes enhancing the accessibility of our major venues that host international performances, exhibitions and world-class sports; hosting a Commonwealth Games in 2018, that can be accessed and enjoyed by all; working with organisations responsible for event delivery and advocating for accessibility considerations to be addressed in planning. We also support a wide range of events throughout the year highlighting inclusiveness. This includes support for activities for seniors, such as Seniors Week and offering a diverse and inclusive program of events through our libraries. What the community said they want us to do To ensure that everyone has the opportunity to fully participate in the tourism, sporting and cultural life of the Gold Coast, stakeholders suggested the following: •• the City conduct its events in accessible venues and provide an events checklist to help ensure that all events have a focus on access and inclusion •• promote the importance of access in the City's tourism strategy, including why providing good access makes good business sense •• provide the business community with support and guidance to maximise accessible tourism opportunities and market the Gold Coast as an accessible city, particularly in the lead up to the 2018 Commonwealth Games. 70
  • 71. What are our key actions? What does this mean for me? Action: We will require event organisers to provide equitable access for people with disabilities and communicate the location of accessible features and any potential barriers to access. (Refer to Action 6.6.) Action: Our Active and Healthy Program will include specific activities for people with disabilities, seniors and families with children. The community will be invited to provide feedback on the program and activities. Hard copies of the program will be distributed to local disability and seniors organisations and to residents and visitors without internet access upon request. (Refer to Action 6.1.) Action: Advocate and recommend to Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games Corporation (GOLDOC) to promote an accessible and inclusive Games — A Games for everyone. (Refer to Action 6.10.) I have the opportunity to attend a wider range of events in the city. I can participate in the City’s Active and Healthy Program. I will have the opportunity to be part of the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games experience and celebrations, and there will be a legacy of improved access to sporting venues and public spaces across the city. 71
  • 72. The City will progressively improve access and inclusion to our organised events and advocate for accessible tourism and accessible non-community events (such as the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games 2018) through the following actions. Outcome 1: Programs and facilities provided by us are accessible for people of all ages and abilities. Action Timeline Resp 6.1 Continue our Active and Healthy Program to include specific activities for: Ongoing P&RS 2014 P&RS •• people with disabilities •• seniors •• families with young children. Provide opportunities to the community to give feedback on the program and activities, and reflect this in the program where and when possible. Continue to distribute hard-copy programs to local disability and seniors organisations and to residents and visitors without internet access upon request, to the extent brochures remain available. 6.2 Develop an 'Event and Activity Accessibility Checklist' by Parks and Recreational Services, in conjunction with Social Development and Community Safety, to guide accessible events and programs. Distribute the completed checklist to all activity providers in our Active and Healthy Program, to raise awareness and facilitate accessible and inclusive activities and events. Key Resp Responsibility CGU ED Economic Development ES Executive Services P&RS Parks and Recreational Services SD&CS Social Development and Community Safety SE 72 Commonwealth Games Unit Special Events
  • 73. Outcome 2: People of all ages and abilities can participate in City-supported community events including the Seniors Week events. Action Timeline Resp 6.3 Amend the Community Grants Program (incorporating Seniors Week Grants Program) application process, so that applicants are required to certify that they will provide access for people with limited mobility at their event or activity. 2014 ES 6.4 Provide all applicants for the Community Grants Program (including the Seniors Week Grants Program) with a copy of the Australian Network on Disability’s Event Accessibility Checklist to help them provide events that are accessible to everyone. 2014 ES Outcome 3: People of all ages and abilities can access and enjoy the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games. Action 6.5 Consider accessibility issues in the development of the Public Domain Strategy and the City Operation Strategy consistent with the intent of the Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act 1992 and include input from: Timeline Resp 2013 CGU •• the South East Queensland Regional Disability Advisory Council •• access professionals with experience of planning access at major events, including sporting events •• Social Development and Community Safety Branch •• local community networks and user groups e.g. seniors, families with young children and people with disabilities. 73
  • 74. Outcome 4: Gold Coast City is recognised as a premier city for accessible and inclusive events. Action Timeline Resp 2013 SE 2013 SE 6.8 Provide a list of local contacts and resources to assist organisers to plan and host accessible events, on the Events Gold Coast website. Ongoing SE 6.9 Establish a process to include the Social Development and Community Safety Branch as a key internal stakeholder for consultation on accessibility issues for specific events as required. Ongoing SE 6.6 Include a condition in event agreements for organisers to ensure that their event provides equitable access for people with disabilities. Planning documents produced by event organisers are to include a map/site plan showing the location of: •• accessible parking bays •• accessible amenities •• accessible entrances and exits (e.g. step free), and stair only access points •• accessible food stalls/bar area/s •• accessible ticketing areas. 6.7 Include a copy of Meetings and Events Australia’s Accessible Events: A Guide For Organisers on the Events Gold Coast website and provide a copy or web link to all event organisers doing business with the City. Outcome 5: Programs and facilities provided by the City are accessible for people of all ages and abilities. Action 6.10 Collaborate with Parks and Recreational Services branch to develop an Event and Activity Accessibility Checklist to guide accessible events and programs. 74 Distribute the completed checklist to all activity providers in our Active and Healthy Program, to raise awareness and facilitate accessible and inclusive activities and events. Timeline Resp 2014 SD&CS
  • 75. Outcome 6: People of all ages and abilities can access and enjoy the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games. Action Timeline Resp 6.11 Advocate and recommend to Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games Corporation (GOLDOC) to promote an accessible and inclusive Games — A Games for everyone - including: Ongoing CGU 6.12 Advocate and recommend to the Queensland Government (Office of Commonwealth Games Coordination) to promote an accessible and inclusive Games — A Games for everyone. Ongoing CGU 6.13 Advocate and recommend to Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games Corporation (GOLDOC) to undertake access audits of all venues and websites associated with the Games to identify access issues and requirements for improvement. Ongoing CGU •• volunteer training in access and awareness •• accessible signage and way finding •• accessible website and information •• accessible ticketing and programs •• accessible game venues •• working with accessible accommodation and transport providers. Progressively implement audit recommendations to improve access in time for the Games. 75
  • 76. Outcome 7: The Gold Coast community welcomes and includes people of all ages and abilities. Action Timeline Resp 6.14 Raise awareness of the contribution that people of all ages and abilities make to the city, through activities during Disability Action Week and International Day of People with a Disability such as: Ongoing SD&CS 6.15 Work with Gold Coast Tourism to promote tourism opportunities in the Gold Coast for people of all abilities. 2014 ED 6.16 Economic Development to work with Gold Coast Tourism to include accessible tourism on both the City and Gold Coast Tourism websites, providing web links to accessible tourism providers, transport and accommodation. 2014 ED 6.17 Economic Development will network with accessible tourism providers to identify opportunities for increasing accessible tourism in Gold Coast City. Ongoing ED 2014 ED Ongoing ED 6.20 Provide a copy of the Australian Human Rights Commission’s Missed business — How to attract more customers to your business by offering better access to your business to inform local business owners about attracting customers with disability. Target business operators including restaurants and cafés, retail outlets and surf clubs. 2015 ED 6.21 Develop mobility or visitor maps and make them available on the web and in hard-copy as part of the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Game’s information services. Maps are to cover key precincts and include information on: •• location of accessible toilets and change facilities •• location of on-street accessible parking spaces and accessible commercial car parks •• location of accessible pay phones and public Teletypewriters (TTY) •• information regarding what is and is not accessible •• specific programs, facilities or services that may appeal to people with access and mobility challenges, e.g. All Abilities Playground. 2016 •• internet and screensaver messages •• on-hold phone message •• eNewsletter articles •• global staff email. 6.18 Economic Development and Gold Coast Tourism to prepare a Tourism Destination Management Plan 2020. Accessible tourism will be considered in this process. 6.19 Economic Development to encourage tourism operators to consider accessibility in their business planning. 76 SD&CS CGU
  • 77. Priority Area 7: Employment and training What we are doing Our workforce reflects the diversity of the Gold Coast community. We are committed to attracting and retaining diverse staff and creating a culture of access and inclusion for everyone. We have a Workplace Compensation and Rehabilitation Program, designed to support employees in returning to work following an illness or injury. In our workplaces, employees with disabilities are provided with assistance in the form of work station adjustments and modifications and can also access advice and support. We support an accessible and inclusive workplace, starting with new staff induction programs and carrying through to access and awareness training for staff involved in customer contact (e.g. libraries and customer services centres), officers with responsibility for implementing legislative requirements of anti-discrimination legislation (e.g. project managers, development assessment officers) and officers who deliver public infrastructure (e.g. intersection upgrades, centre improvement projects). What the community and our staff said they want us to do Stakeholders identified opportunities to implement an improved and systematic approach with the full range of policies, practices and supporting services to achieve accessible and inclusive employment. A range of suggestions were provided to realise this, including: •• proactively review recruitment policies and practices in collaboration with disability employment agencies and community based programs •• senior executives and managers to adopt a strong, supportive approach to employment and management of people with disabilities, and to the management of staff undergoing rehabilitation, or experiencing temporary disability through health issues •• raise awareness throughout our staff of the particular skills, knowledge and experience that a diverse workforce, including people with a disability, bring to our organisation and the community as a whole •• provide more information to staff on the process of successfully integrating people with a disability into the workplace, and support should be given to those who have a role as a carer for someone with disabilities, young children with special needs, or someone who is aged •• develop more proactive relationships with disability services agencies and providers to assist with attraction and retention of staff with a disability, including removing barriers to employment, and implementing reasonable adjustment processes to meet the needs of staff. 78
  • 78. What are our key actions? What does this mean for me? Action: We will investigate opportunities to increase the number of our contracts with local social benefits suppliers for the supply of goods and services in suitable procurement spend categories. (Refer to Action 7.2.) I will have access to more employment opportunities. Action: Develop a Reasonable Adjustment Policy to assist us to attract skilled and talented people with a disability and to retain employees who may acquire a disability. (Refer to Action 7.5.) I have a greater range of employment options and I feel valued as a City employee. Action: Conduct a comprehensive review of recruitment processes through targeted community engagement with the local disability sector, current trainees and employees with a disability, to identify any barriers in our processes. A plan will be developed and implemented for progressive removal of barriers. (Refer to Action 7.12.) When applying for City jobs I know that I am involved in an open and transparent recruitment process. Action: Provide training in disability access and awareness for all staff who routinely interact with the public. (Refer to Action 7.26.) At City locations such as customer service centres, libraries, aquatic centres and City Tourist Parks, I will be served by staff who have been trained in disability access and awareness. 79
  • 79. The City will progressively improve access and inclusion to its employment and training through the following actions. Outcome 1: We support social enterprise through our business processes. Action Timeline 7.1 Promote the availability of social benefits suppliers across the City by creating a register of suppliers for consideration when procuring goods and services. 2014 CPR 2013 CPR Investigate the feasibility of requiring Project Managers to obtain at least one quote from a social benefits supplier (where an appropriate, local supplier exists). 7.2 Investigate opportunities to increase the number of contracts with local social benefits suppliers for the supply of goods and services in suitable procurement spend categories. Key Resp Responsibility CB Construction Branch CD City Development CP City Planning CPR Corporate Procurement CR Corporate Risk DB Design Branch DMU Disaster Management Unit GCW Gold Coast Water HR&LS Health, Regulatory and Lifeguard Services LS&CD Library Services and Cultural Development P Projects P&C People and Culture P&RS Parks and Recreational Services RS Revenue Services SD&CS Social Development and Community Safety TP Tourist Parks T Traffic W&RM 80 Resp Waste and Resources Management
  • 80. Outcome 2: Accessible emergency procedures are in place at all City staff and customer premises. Action Timeline Resp 7.3 People and Culture to formally advise Facilities Management whenever an employee requiring a Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan joins our organisation. Ongoing P&C Outcome 3: All new City employees are provided with information on access and inclusion. Action 7.4 Develop a fact sheet on access and inclusion and provide it to all new employees at induction. Timeline Resp 2013 P&C SD&CS Outcome 4: We support supervisors and existing employees with disabilities. Action 7.5 Develop a Reasonable Adjustment Policy to assist us to attract skilled and talented people with a disability and to retain employees who may acquire a disability. Timeline Resp 2013 P&C Outcome 5: We assist staff who acquire a workplace injury to recover and return to work. Action Timeline Resp 7.6 Review our injury management processes, including our Redeployment Program, in conjunction with Corporate Risk and key stakeholders (such as ill and/or injured staff), to identify any additional training and support needs for Health and Injury Management officers, People and Culture Consultants and Managers / Supervisors. 2013 P&C 7.7 Continue to provide resources for Supervisors and Managers to support the return to work of a staff member who has acquired a disability, or significant injury or illness. Resources include: Ongoing CR •• Return to Work Guide for Supervisors and Managers •• contacts for counselling and support services e.g. the Employee Assistance Program and Beyond Blue •• a report, where required, to identify options for workplace modifications. 81
  • 81. Outcome 6: We are proactive in providing accessible and inclusive employment, training and work experience. Action Timeline Resp 7.8 Ensure all position descriptions, job application forms, job application guides and work skills/traineeship forms on our webpage are provided in PDF and MS Word formats to facilitate access for someone using screen reading software. 2013 P&C 7.9 Update our 'How to submit a job application' webpage to include options for contact via: 2013 P&C •• email •• National Relay Service. Outcome 7: We work with the local disability sector to improve access to employment and work experience opportunities for people with a disability. Action Timeline Resp 7.10 People and Culture Branch to meet twice annually with the Vocational Educational and Training (VET) Network Gold Coast, to share information and identify opportunities for improving our employment and work experience processes for people with a disability. 2013 P&C 7.11 Investigate the feasibility of a work experience project between the City and the Vocational Education and Training (VET) Network Gold Coast, for inclusive and accessible work experience participation for people with disabilities (not restricted to practicum requirements for a designated course or study area). 2013 P&C 7.12 Conduct a comprehensive review of recruitment processes through targeted community engagement with the local disability sector, current trainees and employees with a disability, to identify any barriers in our processes. 2015 P&C 82 Develop and implement a plan for progressive removal of barriers.
  • 82. Outcome 8: The wellbeing of all our staff is valued and supported. Action Timeline Resp 7.13 Continue to deliver the Health Promotion Program to promote activities that target identified health needs and are accessible to staff of all ages and abilities. Health needs may include: Ongoing CR •• diet •• physical activity •• stress and anxiety. Outcome 9: Our officers are provided with training in access and inclusion. Action 7.14 Ensure that online and printed training material produced by the People and Culture Branch is informed by Vision Australia’s Fact Sheets for accessibility. Timeline Resp 2013 P&C 2013 P&C 2013 P&C Provide information for staff upon request in: •• audio •• large print •• a format that is compatible with screen reading technology e.g. Microsoft Word or other PDF alternative. 7.15 Utilise the Australian Network on Disability’s Accessible Events Checklist in planning and delivering all staff training sessions — see and.org.au/pages/event-checklist.html Ensure that all training invitations include venue accessibility information. For example, a description of the access at the venue, as well as a message encouraging participants to notify organisers of any accessibility requirements they may have. 7.16 Review the Organisational Learning Unit’s Supervisory Development and Recruitment and Selection training content to include awareness raising material for non-discriminatory supervisory behaviours and selection and recruitment processes. 83
  • 83. Outcome 9 (cont): Our officers are provided with training in access and inclusion. Action Timeline Resp 7.17 Provide disability access and awareness training to all People and Culture staff, and Diversity and Equity Officers, to increase understanding of diversity, access and inclusion of people with a disability. 2013 P&C 7.18 Provide disability access and awareness training to relevant Corporate Risk and Health and Injury Management officers to increase understanding of diversity, access and inclusion of people with a disability. 2013 CR Ongoing TP 7.20 Provide training to staff on our obligations under anti-discrimination legislation, and relevant Australian Disability Standards. 2013 2014 2013 CB DB P 7.21 Develop the Gold Coast Water customer management framework and customer service plans to consider accessibility issues and identify staff training needs. 2013 GCW (Operational Performance) 7.22 Provide training for all Traffic Branch staff involved in the planning and design of traffic management and operations of our obligations under anti-discrimination legislation, and relevant Australian Disability Standards. 2013 T 7.23 Provide training to building certification officers on Building Code of Australia/ National Construction Code and the Disability (Access to Premises — Buildings) Standards 2009 and all associated Australian Standards, as part of their accreditation. Ongoing HR&LS 7.24 Provide training for all Customer Contact staff in disability access and awareness, including communicating with people with disabilities and the use of assistive and adaptive technology, for example, hearing loops and the National Relay Service. Ongoing CC 7.25 Provide opportunities for access and inclusion training to all relevant officers across the organisation as resources permit. Ongoing SD&CS DMU 7.26 Provide training in disability access and awareness for all staff who routinely interact with the public. Ongoing P&RS LS&CD W&RM P&RS RS 7.19 Encourage contracted staff who routinely interact with the public to undertake disability, access and awareness training. 84
  • 84. Outcome 9 (cont): Our officers are provided with training in access and inclusion. Action Timeline Resp 7.27 The Local Disaster Management Group and Incident Management Team in the Disaster Coordination Centre, are provided information/ training to raise awareness on disability and access issues to inform planning and decision making in disaster events. 2013 DMU 7.28 Provide training for Town Planning Advice Counter staff in disability awareness, including communicating with people with disabilities. 2013 CD 7.29 Provide training for relevant City Development staff, in particular technical officers, planners, engineers, building compliance inspectors on disability access and awareness to increase understanding of diversity, access and inclusion of people with a disability. 2014 CD 7.30 Provide training for relevant City Planning staff, in particular planners, on disability access and awareness to increase understanding of diversity, access and inclusion of people with a disability. 2013 CP 85
  • 85. Photographer John Mills
  • 86. How we will monitor, evaluate and update the plan The Accessible and Inclusive City Action Plan will be subject to ongoing monitoring and review. Yearly progress reporting will be conducted internally through an Action Plan Steering Group and communicated to the community. Progress reports will include performance indicators developed to measure success of the plan. Monitoring may in some instances result in amendments or changes to actions to ensure they are timely, responsive to emerging issues and opportunities and reflect progress. The community will be consulted seeking feedback on the City’s progress on the actions, and to inform us of new community priorities that should be considered in future reviews. We will facilitate the development of a community based group to report back on progress and gain feedback. A complete review of the plan, including evaluation of progress and revision of actions will occur from 2016. This process will involve engaging City of Gold Coast staff and the community. 87
  • 87. Appendix 1: Glossary Accessible - Having features to enable use of goods and services by everyone. Accessible path of travel - An uninterrupted path of travel to, into or within a building, providing access to all accessible facilities. Advocacy — Lobbying State and Commonwealth Members of Parliament and government departments for funds and services and submitting proposals for legislative change. Best practice — A superior method, innovation or world class practice that contributes to the improved performance of an organisation, usually recognised as best by other peer organisations. For example, in some cases best practice in disability access may exceed compliance with the Disability Discrimination Act 1992. Braille - A system of touch reading for the blind, which employs raised dots that are evenly arranged in quadrangular letter spaces or cells. Discrimination — the practice or act of treating a person unfavourably because of attributes listed below. Equitable Access — Individuals have fair and socially just opportunity to access services, information, facilities, places and opportunities to engage in civic life, regardless of their age, sex, race, impairment/disability, religious belief or activity, relationship or parental status, trade union activity, lawful sexual activity, sexuality, pregnancy, breast feeding needs, family responsibilities, income or gender identity. It requires the identification and removal of barriers that prevent equitable access. Handrail - A rail used in circulation areas such as corridors, passageways, ramps and stairways to assist in continuous movement. Kerb ramp - An inclined surface on a continuous accessible path of travel with a maximum rise of 190 mm, a length not greater than 1520 mm and a gradient not steeper than 1 in 8, located within or attached to a kerb. Sensory impairment - Any significant loss of hearing or vision. Tactile ground surface indicator (TGSI) - Truncated cones and/or bars installed on the ground or floor surface, designed to provide pedestrians who are blind or vision-impaired with warning or directional orientation information. Tactile signs - Signage incorporating raised text, and/or symbols and Braille to enable touch reading by people who are blind or who are vision-impaired. Universally designed housing — Housing that is designed for occupants of all ages and abilities, including visitors. They contain features such as level entrance to the front door, wider hallways and accessible amenities. 89
  • 88. Appendix 2: Engagement methods Engagement for the development of the Accessible and Inclusive City Action Plan was primarily facilitated by the Institute of Access Training Australia (IATA), which has extensive experience in developing action plans for large organisations, such as City of Gold Coast. IATA also possess impressive skill in engagement and provided vital leadership to our reference and project group during the development phase of this plan. Various engagement methods were used to offer accessibility and flexibility in an effort to ensure that participation was easy and accessible to anyone who wished to be involved. Specific methods included: •• community forums •• presentations/information sessions •• focus groups •• surveys •• written submissions •• phone/email/SMS/person-to-person interviews •• informal discussions •• comments via our 'Have your say' community engagement webpage. Further details regarding the main forms of engagement are outlined below. Employee forums Fifteen one and half hour forums were held across various areas of City of Gold Coast service areas and operations to obtain feedback on activities occurring across the organisation on access and suggestions for future improvements. A total of 88 employees attended. The following four key questions, in relation to access and inclusion within the organisation, were covered during the sessions: •• What is your branch currently doing to provide and improve access for people with disabilities? •• What barriers are you aware of which prevent people with disabilities accessing City services? •• What suggestions do you have to remove barriers? •• What are your suggested priorities for action? Employee survey A survey was distributed online, and in hard-copy to all City staff. The survey was designed so that employees could respond while maintaining anonymity. The purpose of the survey was to enable anyone within the organisation to provide input if they wished and staff were encouraged to provide 90
  • 89. comment from an employee, and personal perspective. Uptake across the organisation was impressive, with over 330 responses received. The survey covered the following key areas and questions: •• What are the main methods of communication you use with other employees and the community? •• What is your level of understanding of access needs of people that have various access and mobility challenges? •• What is your work area currently doing to improve access and/or to include people with a disability? •• Are you aware of any access barriers in your work area, or in the service or information that your area provides to the organisation and the community? (please describe) •• What actions would you suggest for removing these barriers and improving access? •• Have you experienced any access barriers or issues in getting to or undertaking your work? •• What training would you like to undertake and who else should attend such training? •• Do you have any other specific concerns, issues, opportunities or general comments in relation to access, inclusion and disability? Community forums and focus groups Four service user/provider focus groups, one City staff focus group and three open community forums were conducted. A total of 94 people attended. The focus groups provided the opportunity for specific service users and service providers to engage with us and discuss issues in a relaxed environment. The community forums were targeted at organisations and agencies that represent, support, or service people with a disability. The staff focus group was held to enable staff, (particularly staff with a disability, or caring for a person with a disability or other access challenges), with a specific opportunity to provide input and express their experiences and ideas in relation to issues, opportunities and priorities for access and inclusion action. The following four key questions were discussed at these sessions: •• What are we doing well? •• What are the access barriers and issues? •• What suggestions do you have for access action? •• What are your suggested priorities for access action? The consultation process identified a range of actions, issues and opportunities relating to access across the organisation, which have formed the basis of access improvement actions in this action plan. The feedback from engagement was invaluable in identifying current barriers experienced by staff and community members, as well as opportunities for us to take positive action to improve access and inclusion for everyone. The feedback and suggestions have been carefully considered by the City and included in the plan. 91
  • 90. Appendix 3: Stakeholders Organisations involved in community workshops and focus groups included: Able Australia Service — Gold Coast Better Hearing Australia — Gold Coast Inc. Gold Coast Multiple Sclerosis Support Group Mudgeeraba Special School Gold Coast Advocacy Centacare Queenslanders with a Disability Network Gold Coast "Hot Topics" Group Queensland Health, Mental Health Services Gold Coast Amputees" Support Group Parkinson’s Society of the Gold Coast Para Mobility Churches of Christ Care HACC (Home and Community Care) Services South Coast Guide Dogs Queensland Trinity Disability Support Services Community and Specialist Support Incorporated (CASSI) FSG Australia Gold Coast Employment Support Services Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services Carers Queensland Mylestones Employment 92
  • 91. Southern Star Community Services Nerang Community Respite Care Association Ozcare Shepherd Community Services House With No Steps Disabled Surfers Association Australia Multicap Volunteering Gold Coast Southport Church of Christ Catholic Women’s League Queensland Education Mental Illness Fellowship Queensland ON-Q Human Resources Vision Australia Gold Coast Institute of TAFE MS Society Queensland Spiritus — The Anglican Church Caring Gold Coast/Tweed Seniors Paper Gold Coast Seniors Regional Round Table Committee Spinal Injures Association Australia 93
  • 92. How to get a copy of the Draft Accessible and Inclusive City Action Plan Hard copies of this plan will be available in the City Administration/Customer Service Centres and Libraries. Visit cityofgoldcoast.com.au/access or phone 1300 GOLDCOAST (1300 365 326) for locations and hours of operation. Electronic versions in MS Word and PDF format will be available for free download from City of Gold Coast's website cityofgoldcoast.com.au/access Requesting a printed copy of the plan Copies of the Accessible and Inclusive City Action Plan in hard-copy are free to the community. To request a copy please phone 1300 GOLDCOAST (1300 365 326) or email socialresearch@goldcoast.qld.gov.au.