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A critique of the research study "Attention guiding in multimedia learning" by Jamet, Gavota, and Quaireau for EDET 780, Maymester 2009.

A critique of the research study "Attention guiding in multimedia learning" by Jamet, Gavota, and Quaireau for EDET 780, Maymester 2009.

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  • My name is colin gray, and this my first research study critique for EDET 780 for Maymester, 2009. <br />
  • This study, by Jamet, Gavota, and Quaireau evaluated the modification of attention guiding modes, and how these presentational issues correlate with the cognitive processing of multimedia information. This study builds on the theory of Mayer, Johnson-Laird, and others in the understanding how the dual descriptive and depictive channels affect the acquisition of information. This study focuses on combining two separately studied attention guiding modes, sequentiality and salience. <br />
  • Let’s begin by discussing the purpose of the study, and how it relates to multimedia learning theory. <br />
  • This study focuses on determining the multimedia effects that promote attention guidance. <br /> <br /> The study selects two guidance techniques, sequentiality and salience. <br /> <br /> sequentiality displays information in sequence, as it is discussed, thus limited the amount of new data being cognitively processed at any one point in the learning acquisition experience. <br /> <br /> salience hilights the area currently being discussed, either by influencing the scale or colorization of the area to dominate visual interest and speed cognitive processing. <br />
  • This study focuses on determining the multimedia effects that promote attention guidance. <br /> <br /> The study selects two guidance techniques, sequentiality and salience. <br /> <br /> sequentiality displays information in sequence, as it is discussed, thus limited the amount of new data being cognitively processed at any one point in the learning acquisition experience. <br /> <br /> salience hilights the area currently being discussed, either by influencing the scale or colorization of the area to dominate visual interest and speed cognitive processing. <br />
  • The study groups were broken up into combinations of both attentional guidance effects, resulting in a static/non-salient group, static/salient group, sequential/non-salient group, and finally, the sequential/salient group. <br /> <br /> The static/non-salient group experiences a static illustration with all sections hilighted. The areas are not hilighted visually while they are being discussed. <br /> The static/salient group experiences the same static illustration with sections hilighted. However, when the areas of narration are discussed, they are hilighted in sequence in a different color. <br /> The sequential/non-salient group experiences an illustration that builds over time, showing only the topic area under current discussion. The area is not hilighted in another color when it is discussed. <br /> Finally, the sequential/salient group experiences a building illustration, with the sections under discussion changing color as they are discussed. <br />
  • The study groups were broken up into combinations of both attentional guidance effects, resulting in a static/non-salient group, static/salient group, sequential/non-salient group, and finally, the sequential/salient group. <br /> <br /> The static/non-salient group experiences a static illustration with all sections hilighted. The areas are not hilighted visually while they are being discussed. <br /> The static/salient group experiences the same static illustration with sections hilighted. However, when the areas of narration are discussed, they are hilighted in sequence in a different color. <br /> The sequential/non-salient group experiences an illustration that builds over time, showing only the topic area under current discussion. The area is not hilighted in another color when it is discussed. <br /> Finally, the sequential/salient group experiences a building illustration, with the sections under discussion changing color as they are discussed. <br />
  • The study groups were broken up into combinations of both attentional guidance effects, resulting in a static/non-salient group, static/salient group, sequential/non-salient group, and finally, the sequential/salient group. <br /> <br /> The static/non-salient group experiences a static illustration with all sections hilighted. The areas are not hilighted visually while they are being discussed. <br /> The static/salient group experiences the same static illustration with sections hilighted. However, when the areas of narration are discussed, they are hilighted in sequence in a different color. <br /> The sequential/non-salient group experiences an illustration that builds over time, showing only the topic area under current discussion. The area is not hilighted in another color when it is discussed. <br /> Finally, the sequential/salient group experiences a building illustration, with the sections under discussion changing color as they are discussed. <br />
  • The study groups were broken up into combinations of both attentional guidance effects, resulting in a static/non-salient group, static/salient group, sequential/non-salient group, and finally, the sequential/salient group. <br /> <br /> The static/non-salient group experiences a static illustration with all sections hilighted. The areas are not hilighted visually while they are being discussed. <br /> The static/salient group experiences the same static illustration with sections hilighted. However, when the areas of narration are discussed, they are hilighted in sequence in a different color. <br /> The sequential/non-salient group experiences an illustration that builds over time, showing only the topic area under current discussion. The area is not hilighted in another color when it is discussed. <br /> Finally, the sequential/salient group experiences a building illustration, with the sections under discussion changing color as they are discussed. <br />
  • The subject selection was not identified in the text, although all of the participants were undergraduate students at a university in Renne, France. <br /> <br /> They were all assigned one of the previously mentioned test conditions, and proceeded to the actual multimedia encounter after completing a pre-test, analyzing their previous subject matter knowledge. Those who tested well on the pre-test were eliminated from the study. A computer learning environment with narration was used to present the same body of data to the learner, describing functional areas of the brain in a labeled illustration. <br /> <br /> Following the multimedia encounter, a post-test was conducted using traditional pencil and paper. <br />
  • The subject selection was not identified in the text, although all of the participants were undergraduate students at a university in Renne, France. <br /> <br /> They were all assigned one of the previously mentioned test conditions, and proceeded to the actual multimedia encounter after completing a pre-test, analyzing their previous subject matter knowledge. Those who tested well on the pre-test were eliminated from the study. A computer learning environment with narration was used to present the same body of data to the learner, describing functional areas of the brain in a labeled illustration. <br /> <br /> Following the multimedia encounter, a post-test was conducted using traditional pencil and paper. <br />
  • The subject selection was not identified in the text, although all of the participants were undergraduate students at a university in Renne, France. <br /> <br /> They were all assigned one of the previously mentioned test conditions, and proceeded to the actual multimedia encounter after completing a pre-test, analyzing their previous subject matter knowledge. Those who tested well on the pre-test were eliminated from the study. A computer learning environment with narration was used to present the same body of data to the learner, describing functional areas of the brain in a labeled illustration. <br /> <br /> Following the multimedia encounter, a post-test was conducted using traditional pencil and paper. <br />
  • The subject selection was not identified in the text, although all of the participants were undergraduate students at a university in Renne, France. <br /> <br /> They were all assigned one of the previously mentioned test conditions, and proceeded to the actual multimedia encounter after completing a pre-test, analyzing their previous subject matter knowledge. Those who tested well on the pre-test were eliminated from the study. A computer learning environment with narration was used to present the same body of data to the learner, describing functional areas of the brain in a labeled illustration. <br /> <br /> Following the multimedia encounter, a post-test was conducted using traditional pencil and paper. <br />
  • The subject selection was not identified in the text, although all of the participants were undergraduate students at a university in Renne, France. <br /> <br /> They were all assigned one of the previously mentioned test conditions, and proceeded to the actual multimedia encounter after completing a pre-test, analyzing their previous subject matter knowledge. Those who tested well on the pre-test were eliminated from the study. A computer learning environment with narration was used to present the same body of data to the learner, describing functional areas of the brain in a labeled illustration. <br /> <br /> Following the multimedia encounter, a post-test was conducted using traditional pencil and paper. <br />
  • The study participants were evaluated on four criteria, including process retention, functional retention, diagram completion, and transfer. <br /> <br /> The functional retention results (represented here by the reported mean scores) were the most dramatic, with a significant advantage over the other test groups. <br />
  • Other test scores were similar, showing modest gains over the secondary static/salient group. this chart represents all four scoring metrics compared additively. <br /> <br /> These results indicate a link between both sequential and salient multimedia instruction, in that these devices positively affect learner performance. A slight additive effect is also noted in the sequential/salient group, as predicted by the research hypothesis. <br />
  • The output of this study does have some limitations, which could affect the applicability of outcomes. <br /> <br /> The study focuses on the attention guiding effects of process-oriented data, including step-by-step and procedurally-oriented data, so it may have limited effectiveness on simpler data sets. <br /> <br /> The study output also posits that combining previously understood (and studied) attentional guidance effects can have an additive effect on output. <br />
  • The output of this study does have some limitations, which could affect the applicability of outcomes. <br /> <br /> The study focuses on the attention guiding effects of process-oriented data, including step-by-step and procedurally-oriented data, so it may have limited effectiveness on simpler data sets. <br /> <br /> The study output also posits that combining previously understood (and studied) attentional guidance effects can have an additive effect on output. <br />
  • The structure of this study provides for a number of related research opportunities, including: <br /> <br /> how hues of color can effect the attentional effect <br /> how types of process complexity can effect the learning outcome <br /> and how text display on-screen during learning can effect cognitive processing <br />
  • The structure of this study provides for a number of related research opportunities, including: <br /> <br /> how hues of color can effect the attentional effect <br /> how types of process complexity can effect the learning outcome <br /> and how text display on-screen during learning can effect cognitive processing <br />
  • The structure of this study provides for a number of related research opportunities, including: <br /> <br /> how hues of color can effect the attentional effect <br /> how types of process complexity can effect the learning outcome <br /> and how text display on-screen during learning can effect cognitive processing <br />
  • The structure of this study provides for a number of related research opportunities, including: <br /> <br /> how hues of color can effect the attentional effect <br /> how types of process complexity can effect the learning outcome <br /> and how text display on-screen during learning can effect cognitive processing <br />
  • Let’s move on to a brief critique of the study, and its implications for future research. <br />
  • In general, this study is very well written. The writing is concise and dense, the utilization of previous studies and cognitive theory is referred to throughout the text, and the outcomes of the study are presented in neutral context, enhancing applicability of the study outcomes. <br /> <br /> Also, the research question was well stated, and reflected the intent and structure of the research hypotheses. <br /> <br /> <br />
  • In general, this study is very well written. The writing is concise and dense, the utilization of previous studies and cognitive theory is referred to throughout the text, and the outcomes of the study are presented in neutral context, enhancing applicability of the study outcomes. <br /> <br /> Also, the research question was well stated, and reflected the intent and structure of the research hypotheses. <br /> <br /> <br />
  • In general, this study is very well written. The writing is concise and dense, the utilization of previous studies and cognitive theory is referred to throughout the text, and the outcomes of the study are presented in neutral context, enhancing applicability of the study outcomes. <br /> <br /> Also, the research question was well stated, and reflected the intent and structure of the research hypotheses. <br /> <br /> <br />
  • This study was incredibly helpful in understanding the practical implications of the multimedia theories I have already studied. The types of attention guiding effects used in the study are very similar to those used in the most dominant strains of elearning development, so understanding the additive effects of these attention guiding modes will prove to be valuable. <br /> <br /> The results of the study reveal the potential for further study in the field of multimedia learning, and demonstrate the direct applicability of a wide variety of learning theory to practice in multimedia learning development. <br />
  • This study was incredibly helpful in understanding the practical implications of the multimedia theories I have already studied. The types of attention guiding effects used in the study are very similar to those used in the most dominant strains of elearning development, so understanding the additive effects of these attention guiding modes will prove to be valuable. <br /> <br /> The results of the study reveal the potential for further study in the field of multimedia learning, and demonstrate the direct applicability of a wide variety of learning theory to practice in multimedia learning development. <br />
  • This study was incredibly helpful in understanding the practical implications of the multimedia theories I have already studied. The types of attention guiding effects used in the study are very similar to those used in the most dominant strains of elearning development, so understanding the additive effects of these attention guiding modes will prove to be valuable. <br /> <br /> The results of the study reveal the potential for further study in the field of multimedia learning, and demonstrate the direct applicability of a wide variety of learning theory to practice in multimedia learning development. <br />
  • In conclusion, this study was incredibly helpful in grounding my understanding of the cognitive theories, and their potential for application in contemporary learning development. The study results presented a clear case for implementation of a variety of common, proven attention guiding devices in presenting common types of data. <br />

Research Study Critique #1 Research Study Critique #1 Presentation Transcript

  • Research Study Critique #1 colin gray may 20, 2009 AEET/EDET 780
  • Research Study Jamet, E., Gavota, M., & C. Quaireau (2008). Attention guiding in multimedia learning [Electronic version]. Learning and Instruction, 18(2), 135-145. http://dx.doi.org.pallas2.tcl.sc.edu/10.1016/j.learninstruc.2007.01.011
  • Introduction
  • STUDY // purpose Determine multimedia effects that promote positive attention guidance
  • STUDY // purpose Determine multimedia effects that promote positive attention guidance 1 2 3 sequentiality
  • STUDY // purpose Determine multimedia effects that promote positive attention guidance 1 2 3 sequentiality salience
  • STUDY // groups
  • STUDY // groups 1 2 3 static/non-salient
  • STUDY // groups 1 1 2 2 3 3 static/non-salient static/salient
  • STUDY // groups 1 1 2 2 3 3 static/non-salient static/salient 2 sequential/non-salient
  • STUDY // groups 1 1 2 2 3 3 static/non-salient static/salient 2 2 sequential/non-salient sequential/salient
  • STUDY // subject courtesy of wikipedia.org
  • STUDY // subject 112 undergraduate students from france courtesy of wikipedia.org
  • STUDY // subject 112 undergraduate students from france randomly assigned to one of the four test conditions courtesy of wikipedia.org
  • STUDY // subject 112 undergraduate students from france randomly assigned to one of the four test conditions pre-test to eliminate learners with prior knowledge courtesy of wikipedia.org
  • STUDY // subject 112 undergraduate students from france randomly assigned to one of the four test conditions pre-test to eliminate learners with prior knowledge computer used for multimedia experience with a model of the brain courtesy of wikipedia.org
  • STUDY // subject 112 undergraduate students from france randomly assigned to one of the four test conditions pre-test to eliminate learners with prior knowledge computer used for multimedia experience with a model of the brain post-test using paper and pencil courtesy of wikipedia.org
  • STUDY // results 4 3 2 1 0 static/non-salient static/salient sequential/non-salient sequential/salient
  • STUDY // results 15 11.25 7.5 3.75 0 static/non-salient static/salient sequential/non-salient sequential/salient
  • STUDY // output
  • STUDY // output limited to presentation of process-oriented data
  • STUDY // output limited to presentation of process-oriented data combining presentational effects can increase overall learning outcomes
  • STUDY // next steps
  • STUDY // next steps effect of color dominance on attentional guidance
  • STUDY // next steps effect of color dominance on attentional guidance visual complexity within process modeling
  • STUDY // next steps effect of color dominance on attentional guidance visual complexity within process modeling role of textual information in cognitive processing
  • STUDY // next steps effect of color dominance on attentional guidance visual complexity within process modeling role of textual information in cognitive processing
  • Critique
  • OVERVIEW // mechanics
  • OVERVIEW // mechanics excellent use of cognitive theories as intellectual grounding throughout
  • OVERVIEW // mechanics excellent use of cognitive theories as intellectual grounding throughout high applicability of study outcomes
  • OVERVIEW // mechanics excellent use of cognitive theories as intellectual grounding throughout high applicability of study outcomes research question guided the information acquisition process
  • OVERVIEW // applicability
  • OVERVIEW // applicability practical examples of multimedia learning theory
  • OVERVIEW // applicability practical examples of multimedia learning theory direct applicability to elearning development
  • OVERVIEW // applicability practical examples of multimedia learning theory direct applicability to elearning development opportunity for future study
  • Conclusion