Design Elements

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Design Elements

  1. 1. Oleh Coky Fauzi Alfi<br />cokyfauzialfi.wordpress.com<br />Design Elements<br />
  2. 2. Objectives<br />To introduce the most basic ideas concerning the elements that make up a visual design.<br />To give a general overview of design and to recognize good design<br />
  3. 3. Elements of Design<br />7 Elements of Design<br />
  4. 4. To a visual designer, the elements of design arethe same as notes to a musician orwords to a writer.<br />
  5. 5. Line<br />Shape<br />Negative Space<br />7ELEMENTSOF DESIGN<br />Volume<br />Value<br />Color<br />Texture<br />
  6. 6. Line<br />1<br />
  7. 7. Lines are the most basic element of design<br />
  8. 8. Child’s drawing<br />
  9. 9. Preliminary character studies for a 3D animation<br />
  10. 10. A preliminary drawing and 3D character models<br />
  11. 11. Mathematical Terms<br />A line is the distance between two points<br />
  12. 12. Types of Lines<br />Visual<br />Implied <br />
  13. 13. (a)<br />(b)<br />(c)<br />(a) Visual and (b,c) Implied lines<br />
  14. 14. The Most Important Characteristic: Direction<br />Vertical<br />Horizontal<br />Diagonal<br />
  15. 15. The asparagusshows strength and stability<br />(Vertical)<br />
  16. 16. The warrior and horse express the feelings of power and stability<br />(Vertical)<br />
  17. 17. The warrior and horsesprovide a sense of calmness<br />(Horizontal)<br />
  18. 18. The Cowboy and horses communicate motion and tension<br />(Diagonal)<br />
  19. 19. The example of how line direction affects the mood andfeeling of a design<br />(Horizontal and Vertical)<br />
  20. 20. Shape<br />2<br />
  21. 21. Shape has both length and width and is 2Dwithout mass or depth<br />
  22. 22. Shape is the elementthat communicates the identity of objects most immediately anddirectly<br />
  23. 23. Shapes in a Design<br />Realistic<br />Distorted<br />Stylized<br />Abstract<br />Nonobjective<br />
  24. 24. Realistic<br />Realism is the way we observe images in nature with all the proportions and dimensions of the natural world<br />
  25. 25. A painting using realism<br />
  26. 26. Realism is used to communicate a visual image accurately to the largest audience possible<br />
  27. 27. Distortion<br />When realistic shapes are manipulated orchanged but are still recognizable asnatural objects, it is called distortion<br />
  28. 28. Designs that use distortion<br />
  29. 29. Abstraction<br />Abstraction is the process of reducing natural shapes down to their simplest form<br />
  30. 30. Logos are example of abstraction<br />Road signs, buttons on a DVD player, and Web site navigation are another example.<br />
  31. 31. Stylization<br />Stylizationwill create and establish a unique look for the content of a design<br />
  32. 32. Movie poster concept using stylization<br />
  33. 33. Nonobjective<br />When shapes in a design have no recognizable visual representation to anythingin nature, they are defined as nonobjective<br />
  34. 34. Designs that use nonobjective shapes<br />
  35. 35. Types of Shapes<br />Rectilinear<br />Curvilinear<br />
  36. 36. Rectilinear<br />Rectilinearshapes are sharp, angular, rigid and geometric<br />
  37. 37.
  38. 38.
  39. 39. Curvilinear<br />Shapes that are organic, curved, and round are called curvilinear<br />
  40. 40.
  41. 41.
  42. 42.
  43. 43. Negative space<br />3<br />
  44. 44. Negative space is the empty area surrounding a positive shape<br />
  45. 45. The relationship between the shape and space is called figure and background. <br />Thefigure is the positive shape, and the background is the negative space.<br />
  46. 46. Figure and Background<br />
  47. 47. Figure and background confusion<br />
  48. 48. Volume<br />4<br />
  49. 49. Volume defines 3D visuals that have length,width, and depth<br />
  50. 50. Realistically, volume mustbe observed from an assortment of angles and observed in an actual environment<br />
  51. 51.
  52. 52. Value<br />5<br />
  53. 53. Value describes light and dark. The contrast of values in a design gives a sense of clarity and depth.<br />
  54. 54. Left: Similar values. Right: Extreme contrast of values<br />
  55. 55. High Key and Low Key<br />When values are very light, the term high key is used.Lighter values suggest abrighter or happier mood.<br />Conversely, dark values are called low key. They usually feel somber and serious.<br />
  56. 56. High-key design<br />
  57. 57. Low-key design<br />
  58. 58. Value is also used to describe volume in 2D by imitating the way light revealsa form or object<br />
  59. 59.
  60. 60. Color<br />6<br />
  61. 61. The two basic systems of color are additive and subtractive. These two systemsdiffer based on the source of the light.<br />
  62. 62.
  63. 63. The effects of light on a color image<br />
  64. 64. Texture<br />7<br />
  65. 65. Texture is the surface quality of an object<br />
  66. 66. Types of Texture<br />Tactile<br />Implied<br />
  67. 67. Tactile<br />Tactile texture istexture that we can actually touch and feel.<br />
  68. 68. Implied<br />Implied texture is texture that we can see but cannot feel or touch.<br />Technically, it is not texture at all—it is the illusion of texture.<br />
  69. 69. Left: Implied texture. Right: Tactile texture.<br />
  70. 70. Thanks<br />© 2011 cokyfauzialfi.wordpress.com<br />

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