Making the Shift to the Next-Generation Enterprise
(a multipart series)

Future of Work Enabler:
Flexible Value Chains
Ena...
Executive Summary
It sounds so simple: Successful companies are effective at providing goods and services that their custo...
are retailers that may soon become pseudo-manufacturers
with the help of 3-D printing.
Meanwhile, processes that tradition...
The ability to perform value chain activities from the optimal
source — and the agility to quickly shift strategies and so...
FUTURE OF WORK ENABLER: FLEXIBLE VALUE CHAINS (A MULTIPART SERIES)

5
Why A Flexible Value Chain is Essential
The value chain is a widely accepted model that describes a series of activities
c...
But no matter where the starting point is, moving to a flexible value chain involves
several choices and considerations, i...
ingly possible through social networks, online forums, collaboration platforms
and other mechanisms for gathering opinions...
Quick Take
Assessing Levels of Differentiation, Specificity
Determining which business functions are differentiating vs. n...
Quick Take
Demassifying the Medical Device Value Chain
We recently worked with a global medical device
company to support ...
•	 Establishing technology and cultural readiness. Smart companies will rewire

their IT infrastructure and strategically ...
Footnotes
1	

“Rejigging Manufacturing – Moving Supply Closer to Demand,” The Smart Cube, Dec. 15, 2012, http://www.thesma...
FUTURE OF WORK ENABLER: FLEXIBLE VALUE CHAINS (A MULTIPART SERIES)

13
About Cognizant
Business Consulting
With over 3,400 consultants worldwide, Cognizant
Business Consulting (CBC) offers high...
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Future of Work Enabler: Flexible Value Chains

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Enabling the flexibility to choose and source value chain elements from anywhere -- and change strategy as the market demands -- is a key component of the future of work.

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Future of Work Enabler: Flexible Value Chains

  1. 1. Making the Shift to the Next-Generation Enterprise (a multipart series) Future of Work Enabler: Flexible Value Chains Enabling the flexibility to choose and source value chain elements from anywhere — and change strategy as the market demands — is a key component of the future of work. | FUTURE OF WORK
  2. 2. Executive Summary It sounds so simple: Successful companies are effective at providing goods and services that their customers need, when and where they want them. The collection of activities that makes this possible — from the sourcing of raw materials to postdelivery service — are what we have historically called the “value chain.” The value chain has become more of a continuously morphing value web. 2 FUTURE OF WORK December 2013 However, for a variety of reasons, the “chain” as we know it is increasingly becoming unlinked, sub-segmented and re-looped, as chain segments are flexibly inserted or removed, previously distinct links are melded into joined units, and links that were previously at opposite ends of the chain meet for the first time. The value chain, in other words, has become more of a continuously morphing value web. Put less abstractly, value chain roles and activities that companies previously completed internally are now performed by external providers that provide a competitive advantage in speed, quality and cost. The reverse is also true; case in point
  3. 3. are retailers that may soon become pseudo-manufacturers with the help of 3-D printing. Meanwhile, processes that traditionally took place on-site — such as order management, medical management, clinical trial management and digital asset management — are moving to the cloud. With better access to real-time data and more fluid means of collaborating, upstream and downstream partners are working more closely than ever before. At the same time, value chain participants such as distributors are taking on new roles, such as assembling custom goods according to consumer needs and desires. Whole new ecosystems are being established as erstwhile competitors, teaming as partners, apply systems of engagement to virtually supply data-intensive services such as logistics management to fend off upstarts and embellish the value chain. Perhaps most dramatically, the one-time last links of the chain — customers — are starting to take a leading role in the flow of events as their digital footsteps (what we call Code HalosTM) resound ever more loudly on social media. (For more on this topic, see our white paper, “Code Rules: A Playbook for Managing at the Crossroads.”) In addition to the customer insights distilled from transactional systems of record, the unstructured data generated by customers’ clicks, tweets, likes and posts is increasingly being absorbed and analyzed by forward-thinking enterprises to formulate inventory strategies and inform the development of personalized, localized products and services. An example is auto dealers and manufacturers, which are increasingly investigating how they can use Code Halos to monitor and pre-seed potential sales and improve consumer loyalty through better ownership lifecycle management. With globalization, heightened competition, faster morphing of consumer behaviors and the spread of social, mobile, analytics and cloud technologies (the SMAC StackTM) to measure demand signals, companies can no longer operate by adhering to a rigid and linear chain of events; nor can they afford to overlook the potential of these technologies to unlock new levels of productivity and collaboration by breaking down obstacles to flexible value chains. FUTURE OF WORK ENABLER: FLEXIBLE VALUE CHAINS (A MULTIPART SERIES) 3
  4. 4. The ability to perform value chain activities from the optimal source — and the agility to quickly shift strategies and sources when the situation demands — are separating the leading companies from the rest of the pack. Case in point, when the 2008 tsunami disrupted the Japanese supply of car manufacturers’ parts, U.S. and European automakers boosted production to flood the market and give consumers immediate choices as an alternative to waiting. The ability to take advantage of unforeseen disruption is now being incorporated into automotive manufacturers’ strategies. Community Interaction Model Adopting a flexible value chain involves a range of considerations, such as alignment with business goals, a rethink of core Innovation Model Community Interaction Model vs. context competencies, and technology and cultural readiness. However, there are many benefits to adopting a flexible commercial model, as it supports how businesses need to operWorker Empowerment Innovation Model Community Interaction Model ate today — and in the immediate future. and Enablement Flexible value chains are one of the eight enablers companies Customer Empowerment Innovation Model Community when mapping Enablement to consider Interaction Model and their journey of reinvention for the new world of work, as described in our overview paper, Commercial Customer Empowerment “Making the Shift toWorkerNext-Generation Enterprise.” In this the Empowerment Model Innovation Model Flexibility and EnablementCommunity Interaction Model and Enablement installment, we will look at the many choices and considerations businesses must make when remaking their value chain. Worker Empowerment and Enablement need Value Chain Commercial Model Customer Empowerment Worker Empowerment Flexibility Innovation Model Community Interaction Model and Enablementand Enablement Value Chain Virtual Collaboration Commercial Customer Empowerment Model Worker Empowerment Flexibility and Enablement and Enablement Mapping the Enablers to the 3 R’s Innovation Model Community Interaction Model Virtual Collaboration Value Commercial Model Chain Customer Empowerment Worker Empowerment Community Interaction Model Innovation Model and Enablement Flexibility and Enablement 1 Flexible Service Delivery 2 3 4 Value Chain Community Innovation Commercial Model Virtual Worker Customer Empowerment Innovation Model EmpowermentInteraction Worker Empowerment Collaboration Flexibility and Enablement and Enablement 5 Flexible Service Delivery Virtual Collaboration Customer Empowerment 6 Commercial Model Flexibility Flexible Service Delivery Virtual Collaboration RETHINK the Business Model 3 3 Value Chain Business Processes 3 Flexible Service Delivery Virtual Collaboration Commercial Worker Empowerment Empowerment Model Customer Flexibility and Enablement Enablement and REINVENT Value Customer Empowerment Model Chain Commercial and Enablement REWIRE Flexibility Operations 3 Figure 1 Commercial Model Chain Value Flexibility Virtual Collaboration 4 FUTURE OFFlexible Service Delivery WORK December 2013 Value Chain Virtual Collaboration 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Flexible Service Delivery 7 Value Chain Flexibility 3 3 3 8 Flexible Service Delivery 3 3
  5. 5. FUTURE OF WORK ENABLER: FLEXIBLE VALUE CHAINS (A MULTIPART SERIES) 5
  6. 6. Why A Flexible Value Chain is Essential The value chain is a widely accepted model that describes a series of activities connecting the supply side (sourcing, inbound logistics, manufacturing) with the demand side (distribution, fulfillment, sales and marketing, customer service and aftersales service). But today, value chains are increasingly globalized and virtualized, as companies break apart key business functions into a series of work elements and strategically transform them into virtual capabilities that can be distributed geographically on-premise or delivered via the cloud. Such value chain disaggregation opens new opportunities to leverage partners around the world to lower costs, access new markets and more quickly respond to changing market dynamics and more complex product and service requirements. Seizing these opportunities means thinking creatively about who should perform which elements of the value chain — as well as how and where those activities should be performed — and enabling those elements to be quickly relocated as market forces demand. An example of the growing need for value chain agility is the trend among manufacturers to shift their global sourcing strategies from a “low-cost country sourcing” perspective to one based on “best-cost country sourcing.” While many companies moved their manufacturing operations offshore to lower their labor costs, the revised thinking in some cases is to move supply closer to areas of high demand to meet localized needs. Numerous factors are now being considered when it comes to determining where value chain activities are performed, including commodity price volatility, currency risks, quality adherance, rising labor costs, increased transportation prices, lead times and delivery cost,1 as well as product durability and performance. Lenovo, for instance, built a new manufacturing facility in North Carolina in 2013 to improve the efficiency and reliability of product delivery in the North American market, in addition to providing custom product configurations.2 Another example is General Electric, which relocated some of its appliance manufacturing from China to Kentucky to be closer to centers of demand.3 These strategic decisions point less to a generalized retrenching on domestic soil and more a desire to flexibly change what gets done, and where, as marketplace conditions and customer demands evolve. (For more on this topic, see our white paper, “The Future of U.S. Manufacturing: A Change Manifesto.”) On the other end of the value chain, retailers are trying out new inventory placement techniques, such as fulfilling orders from distribution centers or directly from manufacturers, in order to create the appearance of “ubiquitous” inventory (for more on this topic, see our white paper, “Manufacturers, Retailers Look to Adaptive Supply Chains to Increase Revenue, Cap Costs, Boost Productivity”). This is in response to consumers’ always-on capabilities, which is increasing their expectations for immediate response and empowering them to call the shots when it comes to levels of service. Steps Toward Flexibility Since no two companies approach the marketplace in the same way, there are as many ways to design the value chain as there are companies in the marketplace. Some businesses are already highly virtual, with the employee base mainly geared around sales/marketing and R&D functions, while others have traditionally performed most value chain activities in-house. For this reason, some companies already have a headstart toward breaking apart their value chain elements. 6 FUTURE OF WORK December 2013
  7. 7. But no matter where the starting point is, moving to a flexible value chain involves several choices and considerations, including the following: • Aligning with business goals. The first question to ask when devising a more flexible value chain is what the enterprise’s pain points are. Depending on the business goals and priorities, organizations need to target different sections of the value chain for disaggregation. When upstream and downstream supply chain partners share data on the movement of goods — as well as unstructured data from social media on consumer preference patterns — the data can be leveraged to model demand and regulate supply, resulting in supply chain efficiencies both within the four walls and across the extended value chain. Here are three common business goals and an example of which value chain segment should be targeted in order to achieve them: >> Improving time to market: Forget next-day delivery — thanks to Amazon, the new competitive edge is same-day delivery. In an Amazon-dominated world, fast delivery of end products has become an essential for many types of companies. As a result, if time-to-market is a big competitive factor, companies should consider positioning distribution, manufacturing and even logistics hubs closer to customer demand. In other cases, companies are breaking apart their one-size-fits-all supply chains and creating customized ones for regional markets. The increased diversity in the supply chain increases their ability to move products among supply chains as market conditions dictate, enabling them to reduce inventory costs while providing faster and more personalized service to customers. >> Reducing costs: The three major cost factors used by most companies to measure the effectiveness of their capital deployment are cost of goods sold (COGS), transportation (freight costs) and inventory carrying costs (measure by turns). Little wonder, then, that many companies approach cost-cutting by finding ways to lower their inventory numbers. To do that, forward-thinking companies are working to improve their collaboration capabilities with manufacturing, distribution and sales partners to gain more visibility into endto-end inventory levels and become more flexible about moving goods into the areas of highest demand. When upstream and downstream supply chain partners share data on the movement of goods — as well as unstructured data from social media on consumer preference patterns — the data can be leveraged to model demand and regulate supply, resulting in supply chain efficiencies both within the four walls and across the extended value chain. >> Innovating to produce new products and services: Innovation is a high pri- ority for nearly every C-level executive. In a recent global survey of 311 executives, conducted by Forbes Insights and Cognizant Business Consulting, almost three-quarters of respondents said they are under more pressure to innovate. (See the full report, “Innovation Beyond the Four Walls.”) Increasingly, companies are working to reverse the flow of ideas for new products and services, from company-to-customer, to customer-to-company. This is increas- FUTURE OF WORK ENABLER: FLEXIBLE VALUE CHAINS (A MULTIPART SERIES) 7
  8. 8. ingly possible through social networks, online forums, collaboration platforms and other mechanisms for gathering opinions, assessing sentiment and exchanging ideas. Starbucks, Pepsi, Procter & Gamble and others have led the way in welcoming customers into the value chain.4 Even data from online forums and communities can be used to drive assortment and inventory planning in retail. For example, an online community of health-conscious people might discuss their experiences with the latest model of a popular sneaker. The retailer and manufacturer can mine that data for ideas on everything from inventory placement, to customer support, to research and development. • Differentiating core from context. Companies increasingly realize they cannot “do it all” and, moreover, that they don’t need to do it all. The competitors that are truly worrisome tend to be startups that seemingly appear out of nowhere with an innovative product or service that captures the meme of the moment by leveraging the digital footprints (or Code Halos) of customers, processes, employees and other enterprises. Learning how to collect and analyze the data from Code Halos — not to mention pouring it back into product development and business strategy to arrive at a new way of doing business — is where companies need to apply more of their resources. And they cannot do that when they’re also trying to do everything else, from soup to nuts. This is another reason why businesses are increasingly urged to assess the building blocks of the enterprise and determine which functions are truly differentiating and offload the rest to trusted partners (see sidebar, next page). The relevant building blocks have expanded beyond call centers and IT services, to include elements of product development, marketing, sales, distribution/fulfillment, customer service, human resources, finance, legal and IT. Businesses need to break down those functions into sub-functions and assess what makes them “special.” Further, they need to determine whether any of these sub-functions can be customized for the enterprise or deployed in an interchangeable manner. Organizations can create a 2 x 2 matrix with four quadrants to categorize and visualize their many functions and sub-functions and determine which action to take (see Figure 2). Pinpointing Value Chain Priorities Interchangeability Quadrant 1: Quadrant 3: Differentiating/specific Non-differentiating/specific Proposed action: Keep in-house; focus on building knowledge. Proposed action: Keep these functions specific or convert them over time to make them differentiating. Alternatively, they can be untied and sourced through a staff augmentation/source pool model. Quadrant 2: Quadrant 4: Differentiating/interchangeable Non-differentiating/interchangeable Proposed action: Optimize IT enablement and/or choose a partner; focus on fit and excellence, not cost. Proposed action: Outsource to low-cost provider. Differentiating Figure 2 8 FUTURE OF WORK December 2013
  9. 9. Quick Take Assessing Levels of Differentiation, Specificity Determining which business functions are differentiating vs. non-differentiating is not a matter of sorting out core capabilities or “what we are good at.” Non-differentiating functions are the activities and tasks that must be performed well and might impact the P&L, but superior execution of these activities will not impact shareholder value. Organizations can use the following supporting questions to identify whether a business function is differentiating: • Do the activities and tasks performed by this function make a direct contribution to increasing long-term shareholder value? • Does this function create a competitive advantage? • Does the function enable the company to grow faster than the market or maintain a high operating profit? • For which already established and new capabilities is the company known in the industry? The following questions can identify whether a function is specific, or non-interchangeable: • Should the activities and tasks in this function be performed generically, or does the legal/statutory environment require unique activities and tasks? • Which capabilities are unique to the company and support its key differentiators? • Which capabilities require customization and integration with other parts of the business? • Which capabilities could be identified as candidates worth sourcing or “partnering?” A good example for applying these questions is one of the most commonly discussed functions in a company: order management. Order management encompasses the entire client order process, including taking, managing and executing the order through all channels (Web, phone, mobile, in-store, etc.) and assigning orders to appropriate modes of fulfillment. Based on our experience, companies often believe their order management process is a true differentiator — but let’s take a closer look. Can order management impact long-term shareholder value? Many respondents may say, “Yes,” but when they widen the picture and compare the impact of superior order management execution with, for example, pricing management, BI/analytics or customer solutions/servicing, they often change their mind. In the overall context, order management is indeed a very important supporting function, but it almost never acts as a “leading” function. In fact, many companies have started focusing on commoditizing order management functions since no incremental value can be achieved by superior execution. The trend to move contact center operations to a services provider is a clear indicator of the supporting value of order management. FUTURE OF WORK ENABLER: FLEXIBLE VALUE CHAINS (A MULTIPART SERIES) 9
  10. 10. Quick Take Demassifying the Medical Device Value Chain We recently worked with a global medical device company to support the divestiture of a complete line of business. In general, a medical device company is very similar to a traditional manufacturing company, as both have a strong focus on reverse logistics, device servicing and regulatory compliance. This makes for a complex value chain. We used the value chain approach described in this paper to set up the divested company in the leanest possible way. We identified all business functions that were part of the new company and then led a facilitated series of exercises with the company’s executives to determine the level of differentiation and specificity of each function. Figure 3 illustrates the results of this analysis. So what does this analysis mean? A direct interpretation would be that all functions in Quadrant 4 (colored yellow) could be handled by a low-cost service provider. There may be discussions around the applicability of this concept when it comes to patents and medical affairs management, but nobody will argue with functions like fulfillment execution, returns handling, billing/collections and payroll/benefits being supplied by a qualified third-party. Assigning Business Functions to Quadrants Research & Development Customer Service, Sales & Marketing Product Development Strategy Pricing Strategy Idea Generation/ Research Channel Management Competitor Monitoring Marketing Execution Patents Medical Affairs Management Field Service (Sales Execution) Development Execution Contract Management Appeals Execution Commissions Management Device Delivery Implementation/ New Product Introduction Payer Relations Post-Marketing/ Post-Approval Studies Scientific Communication Quadrant 2 Quadrant 3 Figure 3 FUTURE OF WORK Customer Care/ Education December 2013 Quadrant 4 Quality & Regulatory Affairs Safety & Risk Management Demand & Supply Planning Regulatory Affairs Operations Finance Corporate Strategy & Planning Planning, Budgeting & Forecasting Tax & Treasury Management Performance Management Audit & Compliance Management Facilities Management Finance Reporting Audit Management Supplier Management Corporate Functions IT Strategy SCM Strategy Indirect Procurement Enterprise Resource Planning Order Management Patient Advocacy After-Sales Support Clinical Trials/ Site Monitoring 10 Reimbursement Strategy Call Center Operations Clinical Affairs Management Quadrant 1 Sales & Customer Service Strategy Sales & Business Analytics Solutions/PLM/SLM (Design to end-of-life plan) Manufacturing & Supply Chain Compliance Management Complaints Management Corrective & Preventive Actions Manufacturing Operations Fulfillment Execution Consignment Services HR Bonus Scheme Management HR Management Legal Legal Oversight Device Servicing Litigation Management Returns Handling Intellectual Property Payroll & Benefits Recruiting & Talent Management Time & Attendance Billing & Collections Financial Operations
  11. 11. • Establishing technology and cultural readiness. Smart companies will rewire their IT infrastructure and strategically apply SMAC Stack technologies in order to add flexibility to their value chain. One area of high importance is breaking down the walls that exist between internal systems (particularly ERP, sales, inventory and operations planning) and also enabling better data sharing between these systems and those run by value chain partners. Doing so can result in a more transparent and “platform” view of value chain activities, enabling better decision-making and improving time to market — the single biggest barrier to creating a nimble company and competitive advantage. For instance, linking retailers’ POS data with back-end planning and order management provides insights into what is actually happening in real-time vs. relying on forecasts. Organizations also need to create a way for unstructured data from the Web and other digital channels (mobile and social media) to be integrated with structured data from systems of record. Such data can provide insights on consumer trends, brand sentiment and even service or quality problems. By applying analytics to the combined data, insights and predictions can be sent to various value chain stakeholders, whether in product development, customer service, quality assurance or inventory replenishment. An example is a tile manufacturer we worked with that historically had sold through dealers. As part of its effort to create direct relationships with customers, it began tracking customer behavior on its Web site. By analyzing this data, the manufacturer could identify the most popular SKUs and funnel this information back into its inventory planning systems to ensure the most in-demand products will always be in stock. The manufacturer expects an increase in revenue of 20% when this pilot project goes into full implementation. Such technology change naturally leads to culture change within the organization for both business and technology leadership. For example, not only are internal constituents sometimes reluctant to make information available earlier than what they are comfortable with, but external partners can also be wary of the sudden transparency involved with data sharing. Operational level agreements and service level agreements are suddenly a critical part of creating collaborative success, which — if done correctly — can become a competitive advantage for both parties. Looking Forward In an age of uncertainty and constant change — particularly the changes wrought by unrelenting digitization — companies can no longer function via a linear set of interlocked processes. The business leaders of tomorrow will be agile performers that can quickly shift value chain strategies to optimize speed, quality and cost, while taking advantage of fast-moving market opportunities throughout the world. Such flexibility is possible when companies look at their value chains differently, with an eye toward disaggregating the function being performed from who is doing the work and from where the work is being done. Most companies now realize it’s foolhardy to try and “do it all,” particularly with the development of an innovation economy that requires them to build entirely new competencies around understanding and applying customer, enterprise and process Code Halos. By establishing a more flexible value chain that allows them to continuously shift work effectively within an ecosystem of partners, businesses can refocus their efforts on what really matters for competitive differentiation. What is more, agile sourcing of value chain elements will allow companies to quickly adapt to the conditions they face in the business world today, as well as tomorrow. FUTURE OF WORK ENABLER: FLEXIBLE VALUE CHAINS (A MULTIPART SERIES) 11
  12. 12. Footnotes 1 “Rejigging Manufacturing – Moving Supply Closer to Demand,” The Smart Cube, Dec. 15, 2012, http://www.thesmartcube.com/ insights/blog/blog-details/insights/2012/12/14/rejigging-manufacturing-moving-supply-closer-to-demand. 2 “Lenovo Announces Official Opening of U.S. Computer Manufacturing Line in North Carolina,” Lenovo press release, June 5, 2013, http://news.lenovo.com/article_display.cfm?article_id=1691. 3 “Coming Home,” The Economist, Jan. 19, 2013, http://www.economist.com/news/special-report/21569570-growing-numberamerican-companies-are-moving-their-manufacturing-back-united. 4 P&G Connect + Develop Web site, http://www.pgconnectdevelop.com/. About the Authors Jan Diederichsen is a Senior Director within Cognizant Business Consulting’s Strategic Services Practice. Focused on IT and supply chain management strategy, Jan has worked with leading companies on numerous transformation and integration initiatives. Over 16 years, he has worked with 20-plus companies on operational and IT due diligence initiatives and more than 30 companies on strategic divestiture and PMI planning projects, leading several end-to-end post-merger integrations and business transformation initiatives. Jan’s expertise spans the life sciences (medical devices, in particular), retail, travel and transportation industries. He holds a BBA from GSBA Zurich (CH) and an M.B.A. from University of Wales, Cardiff (UK). He can be reached at Jan.Diederichsen@cognizant.com. Karl Swensen is an Assistant Vice President with Cognizant Business Consulting and leads the store operations and supply chain practice. He has over 25 years of experience helping companies implement change and growth strategies at both retailers and consumer products companies globally from a strategic, business process, technology and human resources standpoint. His work experience includes leadership positions at Oracle, Home Depot and Kurt Salmon Associates. Karl has a Bachelor’s of Industrial Engineering degree from the Georgia Institute of Technology. He can be reached at karl.swensen@cognizant.com | LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/pub/karl-swensen/0/713/242. William (Bill) Cogdill is a Director and Consulting Partner within Cognizant’s Manufacturing and Logistics Business Unit. He has over 40 years of marketing, operations and supply chain experience and is part of the consulting leadership team responsible for setting strategic direction for solutions that address client challenges. Bill can be reached at William.Cogdill@cognizant.com | Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/billcogdill | Facebook: William Cogdill (Bill Cogdill) | Google+: Bill Cogdill. 12 FUTURE OF WORK December 2013
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  14. 14. About Cognizant Business Consulting With over 3,400 consultants worldwide, Cognizant Business Consulting (CBC) offers high-value consulting services that improve business performance and operational productivity, lower operational expenses, and enhance overall performance. Clients draw upon our deep industry expertise, program and change management capabilities, and analytical objectivity to help improve business productivity, drive technologyenabled business transformation, and increase shareholder value. To learn more, please visit http://www.cognizant.com/business-consulting or e-mail us at inquiry@cognizant.com. About Cognizant Cognizant (NASDAQ: CTSH) is a leading provider of information technology, consulting, and business process outsourcing services, dedicated to helping the world’s leading companies build stronger businesses. Headquartered in Teaneck, New Jersey (U.S.), Cognizant combines a passion for client satisfaction, technology innovation, deep industry and business process expertise, and a global, collaborative workforce that embodies the future of work. With over 50 delivery centers worldwide and approximately 166,400 employees as of September 30, 2013, Cognizant is a member of the NASDAQ100, the S&P 500, the Forbes Global 2000, and the Fortune 500 and is ranked among the top performing and fastest growing companies in the world. Visit us online at www.cognizant.com or follow us on Twitter: Cognizant. World Headquarters 500 Frank W. Burr Blvd. Teaneck, NJ 07666 USA Phone: +1 201 801 0233 Fax: +1 201 801 0243 Toll Free: +1 888 937 3277 inquiry@cognizant.com European Headquarters 1 Kingdom Street Paddington Central London W2 6BD Phone: +44 (0) 207 297 7600 Fax: +44 (0) 207 121 0102 infouk@cognizant.com Continental Europe Headquarters Zuidplein 54 1077 XV Amsterdam The Netherlands Phone: +31 20 524 7700 Fax: +31 20 524 7799 Infonl@cognizant.com India Operations Headquarters #5/535, Old Mahabalipuram Road Okkiyam Pettai, Thoraipakkam Chennai, 600 096 India Phone: +91 (0) 44 4209 6000 Fax: +91 (0) 44 4209 6060 inquiryindia@cognizant.com © Copyright 2013, Cognizant. All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the express written permission from Cognizant. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice. All other trademarks mentioned herein are the property of their respective owners.

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