eLanguage.net Shifting the paradigm in linguistics from academic publishing to scholarly communication *Dieter Stein, Corn...
Contents of this presentation <ul><li>eLanguage: Concept & Organization </li></ul><ul><li>The Technology </li></ul><ul><li...
A) eLanguage: Concept and Organization
What is eLanguage? <ul><li>an aggregator for peer-reviewed content from OA journals in Linguistics </li></ul><ul><li>a pla...
Project Partners
From  Language  to eLanguage <ul><li>Language  started in 1924 </li></ul><ul><li>roughly 7,000 individual and institutiona...
eLanguage organizational structure <ul><li>the eLanguage editorial board reviews co-journal proposals </li></ul><ul><li>th...
Co-journal accreditation process forms an editorial board and  submits a proposal reviews proposal and approves or asks fo...
Expanded organizational structure content IT services
B) The Technology
A mashup of tools OJS 2.1.1 + Wordpress 2.2
Data from OJS and WP aggregated on the main page blog section content (WP) co-journal content (OJS) master feed
Open Source Reliability <ul><li>all first-level products (OJS, WP) are based on second-level FOSS technologies and protoco...
Using external tools for added services <ul><li>Google Domain Tools (admin) </li></ul><ul><li>Google Custom Search (search...
Three goals for maximum accessibility <ul><li>to make all eLanguage content accessible via search </li></ul><ul><li>to mak...
Benefits of the platform <ul><li>Benefits for... </li></ul><ul><li>readers : content is free and easily accessible </li></...
C) Where We Are
eLanguage Beta
Recent developments <ul><li>as of July 2007, four journals have been accredited: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Constructions </li>...
Issues <ul><li>producing content takes time </li></ul><ul><li>many researchers have a “wait and see” approach to Open Acce...
What could we do better? <ul><li>Once the platform is hugely successful we could look into... </li></ul><ul><li>unified ci...
D) The Future: Beyond the Paper Metaphor
What happens if projects like eLanguage succeed? <ul><li>Let's assume that in the future... </li></ul><ul><li>a large perc...
Publishing as the key role of the future <ul><li>In the future... </li></ul><ul><li>archiving, enrichment and retrieval ar...
Thank You for listening!
eLanguage.net Shifting the paradigm in linguistics from academic publishing to scholarly communication *Dieter Stein, Corn...
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eLanguage.net: Shifting the paradigm in Linguistics

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I held this presentation at the first PKP Scholarly Publishing Conference in Vancouver Canada, on July 12th 2007. Check out the general conference blog if you want to know more about the event:
http://scholarlypublishing.blogspot.com/

You may also be interested in things marked with the "open-access" tag in my own blog:

http://corpblawg.ynada.com/

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eLanguage.net: Shifting the paradigm in Linguistics

  1. 1. eLanguage.net Shifting the paradigm in linguistics from academic publishing to scholarly communication *Dieter Stein, Cornelius Puschmann University of Duesseldorf [email_address] [email_address] PKP Scholarly Publishing Conference 2007 12 July 2007
  2. 2. Contents of this presentation <ul><li>eLanguage: Concept & Organization </li></ul><ul><li>The Technology </li></ul><ul><li>Where We Are </li></ul><ul><li>The Future: Beyond the Paper Metaphor </li></ul>
  3. 3. A) eLanguage: Concept and Organization
  4. 4. What is eLanguage? <ul><li>an aggregator for peer-reviewed content from OA journals in Linguistics </li></ul><ul><li>a platform for publishing scientific articles on-line </li></ul><ul><li>a source of meta-information on academic Linguistics (book reviews, department news etc) </li></ul><ul><li>an academic community on the Web </li></ul>
  5. 5. Project Partners
  6. 6. From Language to eLanguage <ul><li>Language started in 1924 </li></ul><ul><li>roughly 7,000 individual and institutional subscribers </li></ul><ul><li>issues since 2001 available via Project MUSE </li></ul><ul><li>narrow focus due to space limitations </li></ul><ul><li>slow publication cycle </li></ul><ul><li>high production and dissemination costs </li></ul><ul><li>the goal was to widen the focus </li></ul><ul><li>while at the same time reducing costs </li></ul><ul><li>and facilitating access ...an Open Access approach was the ideal solution </li></ul>
  7. 7. eLanguage organizational structure <ul><li>the eLanguage editorial board reviews co-journal proposals </li></ul><ul><li>the editor in chief is responsible for the management of the platform </li></ul><ul><li>co-journals are independent once they have been approved </li></ul>Editor in Chief Editorial Board
  8. 8. Co-journal accreditation process forms an editorial board and submits a proposal reviews proposal and approves or asks for revisions is admitted as an eLanguage co-journal eLanguage Editorial Board
  9. 9. Expanded organizational structure content IT services
  10. 10. B) The Technology
  11. 11. A mashup of tools OJS 2.1.1 + Wordpress 2.2
  12. 12. Data from OJS and WP aggregated on the main page blog section content (WP) co-journal content (OJS) master feed
  13. 13. Open Source Reliability <ul><li>all first-level products (OJS, WP) are based on second-level FOSS technologies and protocols such as PHP, MySQL, Apache and RSS/Atom </li></ul><ul><li>mature, well-supported and well-documented products </li></ul><ul><li>90% of software development is outsourced - advantage : we can focus on the content and on making it accessible </li></ul>
  14. 14. Using external tools for added services <ul><li>Google Domain Tools (admin) </li></ul><ul><li>Google Custom Search (search) </li></ul><ul><li>Google Mail (email) </li></ul><ul><li>Google Groups (mailing lists) </li></ul><ul><li>Google Analytics (web statistics) </li></ul><ul><li>Technorati (blog management) </li></ul><ul><li>Feedburner (feed diagnostics) </li></ul>
  15. 15. Three goals for maximum accessibility <ul><li>to make all eLanguage content accessible via search </li></ul><ul><li>to make everything published in eLanguage accessible both via library catalogs and commercial search engines </li></ul><ul><li>to make access to our content independent from access to our website by using feeds (everything but the full text of articles is available via feeds) </li></ul>
  16. 16. Benefits of the platform <ul><li>Benefits for... </li></ul><ul><li>readers : content is free and easily accessible </li></ul><ul><li>authors : no costs, greater impact, faster publication, ownership of article, precise metrics </li></ul><ul><li>editors : full control over their publication, less or no headaches about technical issues, no volumes of specialized knowledge necessary </li></ul><ul><li>Linguistic Society of America : &quot;what's good for the discipline is good for the association&quot;, great visibility </li></ul><ul><li>HBZ/DIPP : strategic value / experience </li></ul>
  17. 17. C) Where We Are
  18. 18. eLanguage Beta
  19. 19. Recent developments <ul><li>as of July 2007, four journals have been accredited: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Constructions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Anette Rosenbach (University of Paderborn, Germany), </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Alexander Bergs (University of Osnabruck, Gemany) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Journal of Mesoamerican Languages and Linguistics (JMLL) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>David Mora-Marín (University of North Carolina, USA) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Linguistic Issues in Language Technology (LiLT) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Annie Zaenen (PARC Inc / Stanford University, USA), </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Bonnie Webber (University of Edinburgh, UK), </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Martha Palmer (University of Colorado, USA) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Semantics & Pragmatics (S&P) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Kai von Fintel (Massachusetts of Technology, USA) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>David Beaver (University of Texas, USA) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>a blog has been launched to keep people informed </li></ul><ul><li>launch in spring/summer 2008 </li></ul>
  20. 20. Issues <ul><li>producing content takes time </li></ul><ul><li>many researchers have a “wait and see” approach to Open Access </li></ul><ul><li>communication must be managed well when working in a geographically dispersed team </li></ul><ul><li>for our needs, OJS could be simpler in terms of its UI, even if that meant less functions </li></ul>
  21. 21. What could we do better? <ul><li>Once the platform is hugely successful we could look into... </li></ul><ul><li>unified citation database </li></ul><ul><li>preprint repository (?) </li></ul><ul><li>more &quot;reader&quot; involvement (blog comments? link external sources?) </li></ul>
  22. 22. D) The Future: Beyond the Paper Metaphor
  23. 23. What happens if projects like eLanguage succeed? <ul><li>Let's assume that in the future... </li></ul><ul><li>a large percentage of all scholarly research is OA </li></ul><ul><li>the storage of research data is heavily centralized in a few powerful archives </li></ul><ul><li>the content is annotated manually by its creators, as well as through automatic means (keyword extraction) and social web practices (tagging) </li></ul><ul><li>retrieval of this content largely takes place via commercial search engines </li></ul><ul><li>How does the role of academic libraries change if the storage , annotation and retrieval of information is realized elsewhere? </li></ul>
  24. 24. Publishing as the key role of the future <ul><li>In the future... </li></ul><ul><li>archiving, enrichment and retrieval are likely to be strongly centralized, </li></ul><ul><li>while Net access and storage will increasingly be treated as commodities </li></ul><ul><li>What remains is to enable the creation and dissemination of scholarly content as it takes new forms and becomes usable in new ways </li></ul><ul><li>Universities, scholarly societies and information infrastructure providers need to work together to achieve this goal </li></ul>
  25. 25. Thank You for listening!
  26. 26. eLanguage.net Shifting the paradigm in linguistics from academic publishing to scholarly communication *Dieter Stein, Cornelius Puschmann University of Duesseldorf [email_address] [email_address] PKP Scholarly Publishing Conference 2007 12 July 2007
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