SOCIAL INTERACTION AND SOCIAL STRUCTURE GS 121
Social Interaction and Reality  <ul><li>Social interaction refers to the way people respond to one another.  </li></ul><ul...
Elements of Social Structure  <ul><li>Statuses </li></ul><ul><li>Status refers to any of the full range of socially define...
What are social roles? <ul><li>A set of expectations for people who occupy a given social position or status. Roles are a ...
Role Conflict <ul><li>Occurs when incompatible expectations arise from two or more social positions held by the same perso...
Role Exit <ul><li>The process of disengaging from a role that is central to one’s self- identity.  Examples:  graduating f...
Groups <ul><li>Any number of people with similar norms, values, and expectations who interact with one another on a regula...
Functionalist View   <ul><li>Social institutions create survival and stability for society. </li></ul><ul><li>Social chang...
Conflict View   <ul><li>Major institutions maintain the privileges of the most powerful individuals and groups within a so...
Interactionist View <ul><li>Behavior is conditioned by roles and statuses that we accept, the groups to which we belong, a...
Batman <ul><li>Identify the characters social roles.  </li></ul><ul><li>How does Batman change our society and is it accep...
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Presentation 3 (social roles)

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Presentation 3 (social roles)

  1. 1. SOCIAL INTERACTION AND SOCIAL STRUCTURE GS 121
  2. 2. Social Interaction and Reality <ul><li>Social interaction refers to the way people respond to one another. </li></ul><ul><li>Social structure refers to the way in which a society is organized into predictable relationships. </li></ul><ul><li>The linkage of social interaction and social structure is central to sociological study. They are closely related to socialization. </li></ul><ul><li>Social reality is literally constructed from our social interactions. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Elements of Social Structure <ul><li>Statuses </li></ul><ul><li>Status refers to any of the full range of socially defined positions within a large group or society. A number of statuses can be held at the same time. Examples: U.S. President, son or daughter, dental technician, neighbor. </li></ul><ul><li>Ascribed Status </li></ul><ul><ul><li>is generally assigned at birth without regard to a person’s unique talents or characteristics. Examples: race, gender, and age. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Achieved status </li></ul><ul><ul><li>comes to us largely through our own efforts. Examples: lawyer, pianist, convict, and social worker. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Master Status </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Dominates other statuses and thereby determines a person’s general position within society. Example: People with disability would be remembered as “Disabled” </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. What are social roles? <ul><li>A set of expectations for people who occupy a given social position or status. Roles are a significant component of social structure. Example: Police are expected to protect us and apprehend criminals. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Role Conflict <ul><li>Occurs when incompatible expectations arise from two or more social positions held by the same person. Example: newly promoted worker who carries on a relationship with his/her former workgroup. </li></ul><ul><li>Occurs among individuals moving into occupations that are not common among people with their ascribed status. Examples: female police officers and male preschool teachers. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Role Exit <ul><li>The process of disengaging from a role that is central to one’s self- identity. Examples: graduating from high school or college, retirement, and divorce. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Groups <ul><li>Any number of people with similar norms, values, and expectations who interact with one another on a regular basis. Examples: sports team, college sorority, hospital business office, symphony orchestra. </li></ul><ul><li>Groups play a key role in transmitting culture. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Functionalist View <ul><li>Social institutions create survival and stability for society. </li></ul><ul><li>Social change can be dysfunctional, since it often leads to instability. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Conflict View <ul><li>Major institutions maintain the privileges of the most powerful individuals and groups within a society, while contributing to the powerlessness of others. </li></ul><ul><li>Social institutions operate in gendered and racist environments. </li></ul><ul><li>Social changes are needed to promote equality. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Interactionist View <ul><li>Behavior is conditioned by roles and statuses that we accept, the groups to which we belong, and the institutions within which we function. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Batman <ul><li>Identify the characters social roles. </li></ul><ul><li>How does Batman change our society and is it acceptable? </li></ul><ul><li>Identify your own social role and how it has been changed over time. </li></ul>
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