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Lesson 6 being counted

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  • 1. Lesson 6: Being Counted The 1962 Electoral Act Amendment
  • 2. Question from last lesson ! What inspired Perkins to organise the bus ride in 1965? Perkins was inspired by a similar event in the USA, the Freedom Rides of 1961. 
  • 3. What you need to know and be able to do! •Explain the change to the 1962 Electoral Act •Describe the referendum process to change the constitution  •Explain the significance of the 1962 right to vote federally and the 1967 Referendum to be counted in the census
  • 4. The 1962 Electoral Act Amendment Commonwealth Electoral Act provided that Indigenous people should have the right to enrol and vote at federal elections, including Northern Territory elections, but enrolment was not compulsory.
  • 5. What is a referendum?
  • 6. The referendum planned for 27 May 1967 would put two proposals to the Australian people:! ! •! that Aboriginal people should be counted in the census! ! •! that Aboriginal people should be placed under the jurisdiction of the Commonwealth, not state governments, so that laws affecting them could be implemented consistently and fairly across Australia. The referendum planned for 27 May 1967 would put two proposals to the Australian people: ! • that Aboriginal people should be counted in the census ! • that Aboriginal people should be placed under the jurisdiction of the Commonwealth, not state governments, so that laws affecting them could be implemented consistently and fairly across Australia. A staggering 90.7 percent voted ‘yes’ The 1967 Referendum

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