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2014 humanities exam
2014 humanities exam
2014 humanities exam
2014 humanities exam
2014 humanities exam
2014 humanities exam
2014 humanities exam
2014 humanities exam
2014 humanities exam
2014 humanities exam
2014 humanities exam
2014 humanities exam
2014 humanities exam
2014 humanities exam
2014 humanities exam
2014 humanities exam
2014 humanities exam
2014 humanities exam
2014 humanities exam
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2014 humanities exam

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  • 1. 2014  Humanities  Exam   Mid-­‐year  revision  
  • 2. DATE  OF  EXAM:   THURSDAY  5TH   JUNE   STRUCTURE  OF  EXAM   MARKS   WORLD  WAR  TWO   40   RIGHTS  AND  FREEDOMS   16   POPULAR  CULTURE   14   TOTAL  MARKS   8:30  AM  –  10:15PM   1.5  HOURS  WRITING   15  MINS  READING  
  • 3. WW2:  An  overview  of  the  causes  and  course  of   World  War  II     •  The  Great  Depression   •  The  rise  of  Nazism   •  Fear  of  communism   •  The  rise  of  nationalism     •  The  Treaty  of  Versailles  
  • 4. The  Holocaust   -­‐  6  million  Jews  murdered   -­‐  Carried  out  in  stages  –  laws  –   ghettos-­‐  concentration  camps   -­‐  Geneva  conventions  –  UN  tried   people  for  ‘war  crimes’   -­‐  Abuse  of  human  rights  lead  to  the   formation  of  the  United  Nations     The  Atomic  Bomb   Race  to  develop  nuclear  weapons  (U.S)   Dropped  on  Hiroshima  and  Nagasaki  in   August  1945   Japan  surrendered  on  2nd  September   1945  (End  of  Paci_ic  War)     WW2:  An  examination  of  signi_icant  events  of  World   War  II,  including  the  Holocaust  and  use  of  the  atomic     bomb    
  • 5. WW2:  Experiences  of  Australians  during  World   War  II   •  PRISONERS  OF  WAR   •  More  than  30,000  POW’s    *  Experiences  included  torture,   disease,            death  marches   •  Main  camps:  Sth  Korea,  Japan  and  Korea   •  KOKODA   •  July  –  November  1942,  Australians  defended  Port  Moresby  from  Japanese   occupation   •  Ill-­‐equipped,  607  died,  1015  wounded.   •  Japanese  withdrew            
  • 6. The  impact  of  World  War  II,  with  a  particular   emphasis  on  the  Australian  home  front   •   Changing  roles  of  women   •  -­‐  Women’s  land  army   •  New  opportunities  in  the  workforce  (e.g.  munitions,  aircraft   construction     •  Wartime  government  controls     •  conscription,   •   manpower  controls,  rationing  and  censorship)    
  • 7.   The  signi_icance  of  World  War  II  to  Australia’s   international  relationships  in  the  twentieth  century   United  Nations   -­‐  Founding  member  1945  (Evatt  helped  shape  charter)   -­‐  Involved  in  peace-­‐keeping  operations  since  WW2   Britain   -­‐  Australian  followed  British  foreign  policy  until  1942   -­‐  1939:  ‘Australia  is  at  war’  because  Britain  declared  war  on   Germany   USA   -­‐  1941  –  established  new  ally/change  in  foreign  policy   -­‐  -­‐  tense  relations  with  America  (troops  in  Aus,  racism  in  U.S.   army,  war  brides)  
  • 8. RIGHTS  AND  FREEDOMS   The  origins  and  signi_icance  of  the  Universal   Declaration  of  Human  Rights   •  AIMS  OF  THE  UNITED  NATIONS:   •  to  promote  peace  and  prevent  war   •  to  promote  fundamental  human  rights  and  the  dignity  of  every  human  person   •  to  promote  international  law  and  justice   •  to  promote  social  progress  and  better  living  standards.   •  Human  rights  were  (and  remain)  a  signi_icant  focus  for  the  United  Nations.  This   was  highlighted  by  the  adoption  of  the  Universal  Declaration  of  Human  Rights  in   1948.  
  • 9. Background  to  the  struggle  of  Aboriginal  and  Torres   Strait  Islander  peoples  for  rights  and  freedoms   before  1965   •  The  1938  Day  of  Mourning   •  Protest  on  Australia  Day  –  150  years  after  British  invasion   •  Aborigines  Progressive  Association  and  the  Australian  Aborigines  League  campaigned   for  the  right  to  own  property,  a  bank  account,  receive  a  pension,  full  citizenship  status,   access  to  education  health  services  and  employment.     •  Stolen  Generations     •  From  protection  to  assimilation   •  Aboriginal  Protection  Board  removed  half  caste  children  from  their  families  up  until   the  early  1970’s   •  Treatment  was  discriminatory,  brutal,  unjust  and  had  long  lasting,  negative  impact  on   Aboriginal  communities  
  • 10. The  US  civil  rights  movement  and  its  in_luence   on  Australia   •  Rosa  Parks  bus  boycott   •  Martin  Luther  King  –  non  violent  protest  movement   •  Black  Power-­‐  direct  action  against  racism   •  The  Freedom  Rides  1962  
  • 11. The  signi_icance  of  the  following  for  the  civil  rights  of   Aboriginal  and  Torres  Strait  Islander  peoples:   •  1962  right  to  vote  federally         •  1967  Referendum  –  census  and  federal  jurisdiction   •  Reconciliation  –  making  peace  over  past  wrongs   •  Mabo  decision    -­‐  native  title   •  Bringing  Them  Home  Report  (the  Stolen  Generations)   •   The  Apology  –  Kevin  Rudd  2008  
  • 12. Methods  used  by  civil  rights  activists  to  achieve   change  for  Aboriginal  and  Torres  Strait  Islander   peoples,  and  the  role  of  ONE  individual  or  group   in  the  struggle   •  The  Freedom  Ride  1965  :  Charles  Perkins  and  civil  disobedience/ awareness  raising   •  Eddie  Mabo  –  challenging  ‘terra  nullius’  in  the  High  Court/_ight  for   Native  Title   •  Vincent  Lingiari  –  Wave  Hill  Walk  Off  –  _ight  for  land  rights,  equal   pay  and  better  work  conditions.    
  • 13. The  nature  of  popular  culture  in  Australia  at  the   end  of  World  War  II   Music  :  Dinner  dances,  Jazz,  Country  and  Big  Band  music     Film:    Films  focused  on  Australia’s  colonial  past.       Sport:  Rugby,  Cricket  and  Racing  were  all  popular      
  • 14. Developments  in  popular  culture  in  post-­‐war   Australia  and  their  impact  on  society   •  Television:    introduced  in  1956  and  coincided  with  the  Olympics.     •  Popular  programs  were  produced  overseas   Rock  ’n’  roll   •  -­‐  Rock'n'roll  began  in  America  and  blended  country  and  western  music  with  the   beat  of  rhythm  and  blues  and  the  vocal  power  of  African  American  gospel  music   •  Beatles,  Johnny  O’Keefe,  Elvis  Presley,  ACDC   •  Sur_ing  culture   •  Sur_ies  came  to  represent  a  culture  of  pleasure  and  youthful  rebellion  
  • 15. The  changing  nature  of  the  music,  _ilm  and  television   industry  in  Australia  during  the  post-­‐war  period,   including  the  in_luence  of  overseas  developments   Film   Growth  in  the  Australian  _ilm  industry  after  1970’s.   Major  Hollywood  interest,  support  and  competition   TV   -­‐  Vietnam  war   -­‐  Soapies   -­‐  Reality  TV   Music   -­‐  Protest  music  (Vietnam  war)   -­‐  ABC’s  Countdown  brings  local  Australian  bands  to  the  world.    
  • 16. Australia’s  contribution  to  international  popular   culture  (music,  _ilm,  television,  sport).     T.V.  Soapies:  Neighbours   Music:  Cold  Chisel,  ACDC,  INXS,     Sport:  Olympics,  Sur_ing,  Cricket   Film:  Crocodile  Dundee,  Mad  Max,  Animal  Kingdom  
  • 17. Continuity  and  change  in  beliefs  and  values  that   have  in_luenced  the  Australian  way  of  life     •  Changing  policies   -­‐  White  Australia  Policy  to  abolition   -­‐  Multicultural  in_luences  –  Culture,  Food,  Religious  tolerance   -­‐  A  democratic  society   -­‐  Right  to  vote   -­‐  People  power    
  • 18. KEY  SKILLS   •  SOURCE  ANALYSIS   •  EXTENDED  RESPONSE  QUESTIONS:   •  -­‐  Discuss  the  signi_icance  of…   •  -­‐  Discuss  the  impact  on…   •  -­‐  Use  evidence  to  explain/support  your  response  
  • 19. How  will  you   revise?      

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