• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Apocalypse of Ice Chapter 14.2
 

Apocalypse of Ice Chapter 14.2

on

  • 472 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
472
Views on SlideShare
418
Embed Views
54

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

2 Embeds 54

http://lj-toys.com 49
http://l.lj-toys.com 5

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Apocalypse of Ice Chapter 14.2 Apocalypse of Ice Chapter 14.2 Presentation Transcript

    • Previously
on
An
Apocalypse
of
Ice:

    • Piper
stepped
up
to
the
podium.

“Good
a9ernoon.

For
those
of
you
I
am
unfamiliar
with,
I
am
the
Law
of
Winterfell.”



    • Sansa
laughed.

“He
thinks
he’s
so
important
now,
with
his
fancy
Etle
and
his
crisp
suits.

I
could
almost
believe
it
myself.

But
everything
he
does,
I’ve
whispered
in
his
ear.

He
does
everything
I
tell
him
to
do.

The
only
thing
I
want
is
the
heirship.

Turn
it
back
to
me,
and
your
children
can
be
whatever
Law
they
want.”

She
scanned
the
family,
and
her
eyes
landed
on
Will.

“Well?

It’s
on
you.

What
do
you
say?”


    • “Her
killers
will
be
found.

I
will
personally
bring
them
to
jusEce.

And,
with
your
help,
there
will
be
a
new
rule
of
law
in
Winterfell.
“Does
anyone
have
any
quesEons?”

    • Ursula
Fitzhugh
rose.

“How
do
you
decide
whom
to
‘personally
bring
to
jusEce’?”

    • “Piper
says
he’s
regulaEng
the
pracEce
of
law,”
Indy
explained.

“Anyone
who
wants
to
pracEce
has
to
fill
out
an
applicaEon
and
be
approved.

I
don’t
know
if
Arthur
and
Sabriel
filed
applicaEons,
but
even
if
they
did,
they
wouldn’t
have
a
ghost
of
a
chance
of
being
approved.”

    • “Aren’t
you
going
to
introduce
us?”

one
of
them
asked.
“I
was
geSng
around
to
it,”
Sabriel
said.

“This
is
Ferdinand—“
“I’m
Mag.”
“And
this
is
Magellan.”
“I’m
Ferd.”

    • “He’s
been
invesEgaEng
us,”
Will
explained.

“He
sent
two
people
to
search
our
house
for
evidence
yesterday,
and
he
quesEoned
Arthur
today.

I
wasn’t
sure
if
you’d
sEll
be
here
when
I
came
over
tonight.

I
don’t
know
what
to
do.”

    • “Did
you
tell
him
that
I
did
it?”
Julian
asked.

“That’s
why
I
did
it.

You
weren’t
supposed
to
be
taking
the
heat.”
“Arthur
did
tell
him.

It
doesn’t
sound
like
he
cares.”
“No,
it
doesn’t,”
Julian
said.


    • Sabriel
took
Will
and
led
him
away
from
the
house.

“They’re
going
to
arrest
you,”
she
explained.
“What?”
“Don’t
worry.

We’re
going
to
get
you
out
of
there.

UnEl
you
hear
from
us,
don’t
say
a
word.

You
understand?”

    • Will
was
alone.


    • He
didn’t
feel
alone,
though.

His
reflec<on
looked
back
at
him
from
a
full‐length
mirror
that
covered
one
whole
wall
of
the
room
they
had
put
him
in.

Will
stood
up
and
walked
over
to
examine
the
reflec<on.

He
looked
taller
in
this
mirror,
with
his
head
far
smaller
than
the
rest
of
his
body.

    • The
door
opened
again.

“Will
Stark,”
Piper
said.

“Why
don’t
you
have
a
seat.”
He
didn’t
sit
down
just
yet.

While
standing
up,
Will
could
s<ll
convince
himself
that
he
could
get
out
of
this
trap.

“What’s
with
all
the
mirrors?”
“It’s
simple,
really.

A
mirror
always
shows
the
truth,”
Piper
explained.

“And
you
know
what
you’ve
done.

So
when
you
look
at
yourself
in
those
mirrors,
I
want
you
to
think
about
what
you’ve
done.”

    • “I
haven’t
done
anything.”
“People
say
that.

But
you
might
find
that’s
not
the
case
a9er
you
look
your
guilt
in
the
eye
for
a
few
hours.

Why
don’t
you
have
a
seat.”


    • “I’m
not—“
“You
are
the
Stark
heir,
aren’t
you?”


“Yes.”

Though
he
was
star<ng
to
think
he
should
have
just
let
Sabriel
have
it.

    • “Doesn’t
that
mean
you’re
in
charge
of
the
family?”
“I
guess,
but
nobody’s
in
charge
of
Sabriel.”

    • “So
you
know
what
your
family
members
are
doing.”
“Not
when
they’re
outside
the
house.”

Will
remembered
Sabriel’s
advice.

“I
don’t
want
to
answer
any
more
of
your
ques<ons.”
“That’s
fine.”

    • Will
took
a
step
toward
the
door.

“Then
can
I
go?”
“Not
so
fast.

You
do
understand
that
when
you’re
on
trial
for
Sansa’s
murder,
then
the
judge
will
consider
your
refusal
to
speak
as
evidence
of
your
guilt,
don’t
you?”
“What?”

    • Piper
turned
toward
him.

“Maybe
your
sister
and
brother
have
told
you
that
you
can
refuse
to
answer
my
ques<ons.

That
there
won’t
be
any
cost
to
you
if
you
do.

They
are
wrong.

If
you
don’t
speak
to
me,
then
convincing
a
judge
that
you
are
guilty
will
be
the
easiest
thing
in
the
world.”


    • “If
the
judge
is
Lucia—“



“It
doesn’t
maRer
who
the
judge
is.

Who
do
you
think
that
they’re
going
to
believe,
Will?

My
uncontroverted
evidence,
or
your
silence
in
the
face
of
the
truth?”

    • “It’s
not
true.”
“Yes.

Yes,
it
is.

I
know
that
the
night
Sansa
died,
she
was
on
her
way
to
your
house.

Your
wife
was
at
work.

Your
children
are
far
too
young
to
pull
the
trigger
on
a
gun.

I
know
that
you
killed
her.

You
know
it,
too.”
“No,
I
don’t.”

    • “I
know
when
you’re
lying
to
me,
Will.”
“I’m
not
lying.

My
uncle
did
it.”

    • “You
don’t
think
I’m
actually
going
to
believe
that,
do
you?”
“It’s—“
“Julian
Stark—no,
Julian
Amana—has
his
own
family.

He
doesn’t
have
to
be
involved
anymore.

Why
would
he
leave
them
to
kill
someone
for
you?

I
don’t
you
to
try
to
answer
that
with
another
lie.

We
both
know
that
he
would
never
do
that.

I
need
the
truth,
Will.

I
know
you
killed
your
great‐grandmother.

I
need
to
know
why.

Now,
sit
down
and
start
telling
me
why.”

    • It
was
difficult
to
make
a
phone
call
on
the
best
of
days.

Tonight,
though,
either
no
one
was
at
Brandon’s
old
office
or
everyone
was
refusing
to
pick
up
the
telephone.
“I
should
go
over
there,”
she
said,
pacing
in
front
of
the
chair
by
the
phone.

“Demand
that
they
release
him.”

    • “You
can’t,”
Jan
said
from
the
dining
table.

“They’ll
just
take
you,
too.”
“They
will,
won’t
they?

Damn
it.”

Sabriel
collapsed
into
the
chair.

    • “They
might
not,”
Arthur
said.

“If
Will’s
the
one
they
really
want,
then
you
might
be
okay.”
“Might
be.”

But
Sabriel
didn’t
move.

“I
want
a
liYle
more
than
that
before
I
go
running
off
to
Piper.”

    • “We
need
Will.

We
have
to
get
him
back.

I
think
it’s
fine
to
go,”
Arthur
con<nued.
“If
you’re
so
sure
it’s
not
a
trap,
why
don’t
you
do
it?”

Sabriel
asked.

“Sorry,
but
I’m
with
Jan
on
this.

Our
work
is
almost
as
important
as
Will’s.

And
aWer
what
Piper
said
to
you
about
conspiracy,
he
could
probably
lock
the
two
of
us
up
just
as
easily
as
Will.”

    • “I
could
go,”
Jan
suggested.

“I’ve
already
done
my
part
to
fix
things.”
“No,
you
haven’t.

The
rest
of
your
part,
as
much
as
I
hate
to
reduce
it
to
this,
is
to
be
there
for
Gemma,
Meg,
and
the
kids
you’re
carrying
right
now.

Why
are
they
so
quiet,
anyway?”
On
cue,
one
of
the
twins
started
crying
from
upstairs.
“It’s
my
part,
so
I’d
beRer
check
on
them.”

Jan
got
up.

“Don’t
let
yourselves
get
hurt.”

    • Sabriel
took
her
seat
next
to
Arthur.

“I
never
thought
I’d
care
about
all
of
her
fears
and
insecuri<es,
but
for
once,
I
agree
with
Jan,”
she
said
to
him
once
Jan
had
gone
upstairs.
“Are
you
okay?”

Arthur
asked.
“Am
I—of
course
I’m
okay.

Why
wouldn’t
you
think
I’m
okay?”

    • “Well,
you’re—“
“Yes?”
“You
seem
a
liRle
<mid.

I
thought
you’d
be
puYng
up
a
bigger
fight.”

I
need
you
to
fight,
Arthur
wanted
to
say.

    • “Yeah,
well,
I
tried
to
put
up
a
big
fight
a
couple
days
ago.

I
stormed
into
Piper’s
office
demanding
answers,
and
by
the
end
of
it,
I
was
almost
begging
to
leave.

Maybe
Mom
was
right
about
there
being
some
kind
of
virtue
in
wai<ng.

I’ll
call
in
the
morning
before
work.”

    • The
girls
didn’t
need
to
know
that
anything
was
wrong,
but
Jan
s<ll
had
trouble
looking
at
Gemma.

Her
eyes
were
on
Arthur,
who
had
tossed
Meg
high
into
the
air.
“Are
you
sure
she’s
going
to
be
okay?”

Jan
asked.

    • “Posi<ve.”

Arthur
caught
Meg.

“Wasn’t
that
fun?”
Meg
laughed
in
response.



    • “That—I
might
drop
her
on
her
head.

I
can’t
have
anything
bad
happening
to
her.

Gemma
likes
<ckles,
anyway.”

Jan
smiled.

    • Meanwhile,
Sabriel
dialed
the
number
for
the
Law
offices
again.
“Natalie
Horn.”
Arthur
thought
she
would
put
up
a
bigger
fight?

It
was
<me
to
get
going.

“Sabriel
Stark.

You
need
to
release
my
brother
right
now.”

    • “He’s
been
accused
of
a
very
serious
crime,
Sabriel,”
Natalie
explained,
as
if
talking
to
a
child.

“Piper
can’t
release
an
unrepentant
murderer
onto
the
streets.”
“He’s
not
a
murderer.

What
does
Piper
want?”
“Jus<ce.”

    • “You
mean
his
sick,
perverted
version
of
it.

You
need
to
let
me
see
him,”
Sabriel
insisted.
Natalie
dug
in.

“That’s
not
allowed.”
“Of
course
it’s
allowed.

I’m
his
lawyer.”
“No,
you’re
not.”

    • “What
do
you
mean,
I’m
not
a
lawyer?

I’ve
studied.

I’ve
probably
studied
more
than
anyone
else
around
here.

How
dare
you
say
that
I’m
not
a
lawyer,
when
I’m
the
Law?”
“I’m
sure
you
have
studied.

But
you
aren’t
admiRed
to
our
bar.

And
no
one
can
prac<ce
law
without
being
admiRed
to
our
bar.”
“Then
how
do
I
get
admiYed
to
this—bar?”

    • “We
have
applicaEons
in
the
office.

Fill
one
out
to
aYest
to
your
good
moral
character.

Piper
will
review
it
and
get
back
to
you
in
four
to
six
weeks.”
“Four
to
six
weeks?

What
kind
of—“

Sabriel
could
hear
the
horn
honking
for
her
carpool
outside.

“I’ll
call
back
later.”

    • As
far
as
they
could
tell,
Gemma
and
Meg
didn’t
know
what
had
happened
to
their
dad.

Jan
s<ll
hoped
that
Will
would
come
back
quickly
enough
that
they
wouldn’t
need
to
know
at
all.

She
also
hoped
that
Gemma
would
stop
resis<ng
and
finally
say
“Mama,”
but
that
could
be
fixed
more
easily.

    • Sabriel
didn’t
feel
her
best
aWer
spending
most
of
the
night
making
fruitless
phone
calls,
but
she
took
it
out
on
the
opposing
team
when
she
took
the
field
to
play.

She
s<ll
would
have
preferred
to
go
forward
with
her
plans
to
build
a
real
estate
empire.

On
the
other
hand,
Sabriel
was
one
of
the
best
players
on
her
team,
and
she
had
just
nego<ated
a
higher
salary
that
day.

    • Arthur
also
progressed
in
his
career:
he
would
never
have
to
wear
the
French
fries
costume
again,
much
to
everyone’s
contentment.

    • “You
have
one
hour,
Will
Stark.”

Piper
sat
across
from
him.

“One
hour
un<l
your
carpool
leaves
for
work
and
you
are
not
in
it.

If
you
confess
before
then,
you’ll
be
able
to
go
to
your
job.

If
not,
you
will
be
fired.”


    • Will
looked
away.

“Don’t
you
have
other
things
to
do
besides
siYng
in
a
room
with
me?”


    • “I
do.

But
none
of
them
are
as
important
as
siYng
in
a
room
with
you.

You
killed
someone
very
important,
Will.

You
killed
the
founder
of
your
family.

How
can
you
stand
to
look
at
yourself
in
those
mirrors?”


Piper
turned
and
walked
toward
his
throne‐like
chair.

When
Will
turned
his
head,
he
saw
Piper
in
the
wall‐length
mirror.

“Again,
I
have
to
remind
you
not
to
tell
me
that
you
didn’t
do
it.

I
don’t
want
to
hear
it.”



    • Will
stared
at
the
outer
wall
of
the
room.
“I
need
you
to
look
at
me.”
Will
stayed
silent.



    • “Going
silent
again,
are
you?

It’s
your
choice.”

Piper
sat
down
again.

“Clock’s
<cking.

If
you
don’t
care
about
your
job,
then
by
all
means,
keep
looking
at
the
ceiling
like
it’ll
open
up
and
you’ll
escape.”


    • Will’s
head
snapped
down.

“Of
course
I
care
about
my
job.”
“Then
talk
to
me.

Show
me
that
you
care.”
“I
don’t
need
to
show
you
anything.”

    • “Yes,
you
do.

You
have
to
show
me
everything
from
the
moment
you
decided
to
kill
Sansa
Stark
to
the
moment
that
we
brought
you
here,
or
else
you
will
lose
everything.

Your
job.

Your
wife.

Your
children.

Everything.

Do
you
understand
me?”


    • “You
won’t
let
me
go
to
work
if
I
confess.”
“Do
you
understand
me?”
“And
I
won’t
see
Jan
or
Gemma
or
Meg
either.”

    • “Stop
talking
to
yourself.

It’s
not
going
to
do
you
any
good.

You
need
to
be
telling
me
what
you
did
right
now.”


“I’m
answering
your
ques<on.”

    • “No!

You’re
not!”

Piper
shouted.

He
immediately
quieted
down.

“My
ques<on
is
why
and
how
you
killed
Sansa
Stark.

You’re
refusing
to
answer
it.

You’re
running
away.

Is
that
the
kind
of
heir
you
are?

The
kind
who’s
never
willing
to
face
the
music?

Look
at
you.

I
keep
telling
you,
the
ceiling
isn’t
going
to
help
you.

No
one’s
going
to
help
you.”


Piper
paused.

“You’ve
made
a
lot
of
messes,
and
you’ve
survived
a
lot
of
them.

But
this
<me,
you’ve
goRen
yourself
into
too
much
trouble.

The
only
way
out
is
to
tell
me
the
truth.”


    • When
Arthur
and
Sabriel
rang
the
doorbell,
Valen<ne
answered.
“Hi!

You
must
be
my
cousins,”
she
told
them.

“Come
on
in!”


    • “And
you
must
be
Valen<ne.”

Arthur
gave
her
a
hug.

“It’s
nice
to
finally
meet
you.”
“You
too.

I
have
to
go
back
upstairs,
though.

Daddy’s
sick
and
I
need
to
read
to
him.

He
likes
that.”

    • They
saw
BriRany
at
the
dining
table,
staring
ahead
at
nothing.

“Hi,”
she
said
to
them.

“Is
anyone
else
coming?”


    • “Ursula
Fitzhugh
is,”
Sabriel
told
her,
siYng
down
at
the
table.

“She’s
the
one
who
wrote
the
ar<cle
in
the
paper
about
Piper
caring
about
jus<ce
for
some
people
but
not
for
others.”
“Did
she?

I
haven’t
been
reading
the
paper.”
“I
wouldn’t
have
read
it
either
if
I
didn’t
need
to
find
work.

But
when
I
read
it,
I
thought,
now
there’s
someone
I
need
to
team
up
with.”

    • “Thanks
for
hos<ng
us,
BriRany,”
Arthur
said.

“We
would
have
the
mee<ng
at
our
house,
but
we
don’t
want
to
draw
any
more
suspicion
to
us
than
we
already
have.”
“No
problem,”
she
answered.

“We’re
family
now,
right?”
The
doorbell
rang.

BriRany
got
up
to
answer
it.

    • “Good
evening,
everyone,”
Ursula
said.

“Is
Piper
dethroned
yet?”


    • “That’s
why
we
called
you.

If
you’re
willing
to
help
us,”
Arthur
said.
“Course
I’m
willing
to
help
you.”

She
sat
down.

“He’s
a
framming
smug
jerk
who
shouldn’t
even
know
anyone
with
power,
let
alone
have
it.

What’s
new?”

    • “We
have
to
break
him
out,”
Sabriel
said.

“Will’s
already
lost
his
chance
to
fix
the
phones.

We
have
to
help
him
before
he
loses
anything
else.”


    • “I
hate
to
bring
this
up,
but
what
if
he’s
confessed
already?”
BriRany
said.
“You
think
Piper
wouldn’t
have
called
another
press
conference
as
soon
as
that
happened?”
Ursula
asked.

    • “But
we
also
don’t
want
to
give
Piper
a
reason
to
throw
us
in
jail
along
with
Will,”
Arthur
said.

“The
family
has
to
keep
going.

I’m
not
an
Icon
yet,
and
Sabriel
isn’t
a
Hall
of
Famer,
either.”


    • “So,
you’re
asking
me
to
break
Will
out?”
“PreYy
much.

You
and
anyone
else
we
can
get.”

Arthur
paused.

“Do
you
think
it
could
work?”

    • “Well,
the
lack
of
a
police
force
here
means
there’s
not
going
to
be
much
security.

Which
means
that
the
real
trick
is
going
to
be
distrac<ng
Piper.”

Ursula
paused.

“What
happens
once
I
get
Will
out?

He
can’t
go
home
again.

Piper
will
be
looking
for
him.”
Arthur,
Sabriel,
and
BriRany
looked
at
each
other.
“He’ll
have
to
hide,
I
suppose,”
Sabriel
finally
said.

“And
we
can’t
know
where,
can
we?”

    • “I
know
you’ve
had
a
rough
night,
Will.”



    • Will
liWed
his
head
from
the
table
and
looked
at
Natalie
Horn.

He
thought
of
how
he’d
seen
rougher
nights
than
this,
then
started
trying
to
compare
sleeping
on
a
bed
in
a
jail
cell
to
sleeping
in
a
reclining
chair
in
his
college
house.

He
only
said,
“Why
are
you
here?”


    • “To
help
you.”
“I
don’t
need
your
help.”

    • “Piper’s
not
going
to
stop,
though,”
Natalie
con<nued.

“You
can
keep
telling
him
that
you’re
innocent,
but
we
both
know
that
means
nothing
to
him.

You’ll
have
more
nights
like
the
last
one.

More
days
away
from
your
family.

Your
wife’s
giving
birth
today,
isn’t
she?”
“I
think
so.”

Will
didn’t
know
exactly
what
day
it
was.
“So
let
me
help
you.

I’ll
take
you
home
so
that
you
can
see
your
children
aWer
you
confess.”

    • “And
then
I’ll
stay
here
in
jail.

I
won’t.”
“There
is
a
lot
of
evidence
against
you,
Will.

You’ll
have
to
admit
that
it’s
true
eventually.

It’ll
be
less
painful
if
you
do
it
now,
for
both
yourself
and
your
family.”

    • “What
are
you
threatening
me
with?”
“I’m
actually
not
threatening
you.

I’m
telling
you
that
if
you
confess,
things
are
going
to
get
easier.

You
probably
had
a
good
reason
for
doing
what
you
did.

She
was
threatening
your
family.

She
put
you
in
an
impossible
situa<on.”
Will
didn’t
react.

He
was
geYng
<red
of
talking
to
these
people.

    • “So
if
you
tell
me
what
happened,
I
can
put
in
a
good
word
for
you
with
Piper
and
with
the
judge.

Things
might
be
easier
for
you.”
Will
stayed
silent.

    • “Or
you
can
stay
here
and
make
it
harder.

Piper’s
going
to
be
angry.

He’ll
probably
be
angry
enough
to
kill
you.

That
doesn’t
have
to
happen,
Will.

At
any
<me
today,
you
can
say
that
you
want
to
talk
to
me.

But
my
offer
of
leniency
ends
at
midnight
tonight.

Think
about
it.

I
don’t
want
to
see
you
die.”


    • Natalie
was
right
about
one
thing:
Jan
was
due
to
give
birth
that
day.


    • 
“What
am
I
supposed
to
do?”
Sabriel
asked,
throwing
up
her
hands.

“I
don’t
know
anything
about
childbirth!

I
don’t
want
to
know
anything
about
it!”


    • “Drugs
would
be
nice!”

Jan
answered,
trying
not
to
scream.


    • When
the
pain
passed,
Jan
had
given
birth
to
two
girls.

Lyra
had
Jan’s
blue
eyes
and
the
same
color
skin
as
Meg,
and
Lirael
had
both
Will’s
gray
eyes
and
dark
skin.


    • AWer
Sabriel
had
put
Lyra
in
her
crib,
she
returned
downstairs
and
found
Jan
staring
into
the
distance
with
Lirael
in
her
arms.


“I
wanted
Will
to
be
home
before
the
twins
were
born,”
Jan
said.

She
wondered
how
long
it
would
take
before
the
next
<me
that
she
got
something
she
wanted.


    • “So
did
I,”
Sabriel
said.

“We’re
going
to
bring
him
home,
Jan.

That
means
you,
too.

We’re
going
to
need
every
friend
we
can
get.”


    • Piper
stared
at
Will.

“Natalie
told
me
that
she
offered
you
a
deal.”
“I
thought
you
knew
that,”
he
answered.

Could
Piper
have
goRen
a
less
comfortable
chair
for
Will
to
sit
in?

    • “Now,
I
don’t
understand
why
she
wants
to
be
your
friend.

In
my
experience,
no
one
wants
to
be
friends
with
cold‐blooded,
remorseless
killers.

Especially
judges
who
hold
your
life
in
their
hands.


“If
the
words
out
of
your
mouth
are
going
to
be
more
protesta<ons
of
your
innocence,
do
not
say
them.

Stop
hiding.

There’s
nowhere
to
run
this
<me.

Your
sister’s
decided
not
to
save
you.

She
knows
you’re
guilty.

She
didn’t
say
anything,
but
it
was
all
over
your
face.

She’s
smarter
than
you.

She’s
considered
her
op<ons
and
come
to
realize
the
truth:
You’re
going
down,
Will.

So
your
family
decided
they’d
be
beRer
off
without
a
murderer
of
an
heir
dragging
them
down.”

    • “They
wouldn’t
do
that.”
“Of
course
they
would.

It’s
the
only
ra<onal
thing
to
do.

Your
daughters
will
be
beRer
off
for
it,
aWer
all.

Being
raised
by—well,
not
peaceable
people,
but
surely
people
less
violent
than
you—is
infinitely
preferable
to
having
a
murderer
for
a
father.

And
in
<me,
they’ll—“

    • Someone
pounded
on
the
door
five
<mes
in
quick
succession.
“Hypothe<cally,
let’s
pretend
you’re
not
lying.”

Piper
raised
his
voice
to
overcome
the
knocks.

“Even
if
your
story
is
true
and
your
uncle
did
it,
you
would
have
let
him
into
the
house
and
stood
by
as
he
pulled
the
trigger.

That
means—“

    • The
knocking
con<nued.

“I
need
you!”
a
woman’s
voice
said.

Natalie?
“Not
now,
you
don’t!”

Piper
answered.

Except
for
the
<mes
when
he
had
pretended
to
get
mad
at
Will,
this
was
the
most
emo<on
Piper
had
shown
for
the
last
two
days.

What
was
going
on?

    • “Yes,
now!”
she
said.
Piper
turned
back
to
Will.

“Don’t
move,”
he
sneered
before
opening
the
door
and
leaving
the
interroga<on
room.

    • Will
stayed
seated
un<l
Piper
leW,
then
rose
from
his
chair,
trying
to
ignore
his
aching
legs
and
back.

He
carefully
walked
to
the
door
to
listen,
trying
to
minimize
the
sound
of
his
loafers
on
the
<le
floor.
At
first,
he
only
heard
whispers
that
he
didn’t
have
the
energy
to
make
heads
or
tails
of.

    • “What?”

Piper
shouted
indignantly.

This
had
to
be
good.
“Ursula
said
you
breached
your
duty
to—“

    • Their
voices
dropped
again.

What
did
that
mean?

Who
had
Piper
breached
a
duty
to?

Of
course,
who
hadn’t
he
breached
a
duty
to?


    • Piper
spoke
again:
“Stay
here.

Help
secure
the
prisoner.

Don’t
let
me
down.

I’ll
deal
with
Miss
Fitzhugh’s
supposed
‘claim
of
right’
myself.”
Miss
Fitzhugh?

The
reporter?

What
was
she
doing?

Whatever
it
was,
Piper
leaving
had
to
be
a
good
thing.

Maybe
Piper
was
wrong.

Will’s
family
could
come
for
him
aWer
all.


    • Will
paced
the
confines
of
the
room,
placing
his
hand
on
the
outer
wall
where
he
wanted
a
window
to
be.

Should
he
get
his
hopes
up?

Would
it
be
any
use?

Did
his
hopes
have
anywhere
to
go
but
up?


    • He
faced
the
mirrors
again.

Will’s
distorted
reflec<on
confronted
him.


“I’m
not
guilty,”
he
offered
to
the
reflec<on.
For
the
first
<me
in
two
days,
the
truth
moved
and
breathed,
unopposed
by
any
interrup<ons
or
claims
of
falsehood.

    • Will
heard
a
series
of
bangs
and
cracks
coming
from
downstairs.

He
strode
over
to
the
door
to
listen
again.

When
the
bangs
and
cracks
subsided,
he
heard
footsteps.

It
sounded
like
people
were
running.


    • “Which
way
are
we
going?”
one
voice
said.

He
sounded
familiar.
“It’s
an
8x8
building.

How
hard
can
it
be
to
find
him?”

someone
answered.
“Ow!”
“Those
must
be
the
steps,”
they
both
said
at
once.

    • Will
heard
nothing
for
about
a
minute,
then
another
set
of
banging
noises,
this
<me
closer.

Finally,
the
door
opened.


    • Darkness
flowed
into
the
room.

Will
couldn’t
see
very
well,
but
he
could
make
out
two
masked
redheads
standing
in
the
doorway
to
the
interroga<on
room
before
the
darkness
swallowed
them
up.
“Time
to
give
Piper
hell,”
they
both
said
at
once.

    • Julian
s<ll
found
the
view
outside
his
own
window
fascina<ng.

True,
he
saw
no
more
than
an
expanse
of
snow,
but
he
saw
a
different
expanse
of
snow
than
the
one
he
had
grown
up
with.

The
Brandon
in
Julian’s
head
laughed
at
that
sen<ment.


    • For
a
year
or
two,
the
new
house
had
made
Julian
feel
as
young
as
his
daughter,
or
at
least
young
enough
to
keep
up
with
her
constant
requests
to
be
<ckled
and
read
to.

He
had
stayed
involved
in
Will’s
life
and
had
even
intended
to
sacrifice
himself
for
the
next
genera<on’s
sake.

But
now,
Valen<ne
sat
beside
him
and
read
to
him
in
the
evenings
aWer
she
finished
her
homework.

She
would
bring
him
his
dinner
and
talk
to
him
about
all
the
games
she
played
at
school,
then
read
to
him
un<l
it
was
<me
to
go
to
sleep.


    • When
Julian
heard
BriRany
coming,
he
climbed
out
of
bed
to
put
on
a
good
face.
“How
are
you
feeling
today?”
she
asked
him.
“I’ve
had
beRer
days,”
he
said.

In
a
house
full
of
healthy
people,
Julian
wanted
to
put
the
best
face
on
his
own
health,
but
his
mortality
remained
at
the
back
of
his
mind.

    • So
he
leaned
down
to
talk
to
BriRany’s
belly.

“And
how
are
you
feeling
today?”

he
asked.

“Are
you
ready
to
come
out
yet?”
“Somehow,
I’m
ready
and
not
ready
for
this
baby
at
the
same
<me,”
BriRany
remarked.

    • “And
what
aspira<on
are
you
going
to
choose
when
you’re
all
big
and
grown
up?”

Julian
asked.

He
pretended
to
listen.

“Here’s
a
hint:
Choose
Romance.

It’s
the
best.”


    • “Or
Popularity.

Popularity’s
good,”
BriRany
added.
“You
mean
Family,”
Julian
said.

“You’re
Family
at
heart,
but
somehow,
I
love
you
for
it.”

“Maybe
I
am.

I
love
you,
too.”

She
smiled.

“I’m
going
to
be
Popularity
for
a
while
and
call
everyone
while
I
can,
though.

You
should
call
people
too
when
I’m
off
the
phone.”
He
should.

He
wondered
if
he
would
see
the
other
members
of
his
family
aWer
this.

    • “Is
there
any
word
about
Will?”

Julian
asked
Arthur.


    • “I
hoped
you’d
have
something,”
Arthur
said.

“I
might
not
even
know
if
things
go
well.

I
know
being
able
to
deny
that
we
know
anything
is
the
best
thing
to
do,
but
it
bugs
me
as
much
as
everyone
else.”
Julian
nodded.

“I’d
have
liked
to
know
for
sure
today
that
everything
was
going
to
be
all
right,”
he
said.

“But
you,
Sabriel,
and
Jan
are
going
to
get
everything
back
to
normal
again.

It
won’t
be
easy,
but
you’ll
get
it
done.”



    • “We
have
to.”

Arthur
<lted
his
head
to
the
side.

He
had
chosen
a
far
easier
task
than
this
one,
but
he
had
learned
that
growing
up
as
a
Stark
meant
you
couldn’t
always
choose
the
tasks
given
to
you.

“Gemma
and
Meg
are
supposed
to
grow
up
today.

What
are
we
supposed
to
tell
them?”


    • “The
truth,”
Julian
answered.

“No
amount
of
pretending
that
nothing’s
wrong
can
convince
them
of
that.

It’s
not
going
to
be
easy,
but
it’s
the
right
thing
to
do.”


    • For
a
few
hours,
Julian
and
BriRany’s
family
and
friends
kept
their
spirits
up,
despite
the
trouble
going
on
around
them.


    • Everything
had
to
end
eventually,
though.

“I
wish
I
could
have
been
around
more,
Valen<ne.”

Julian
hugged
his
daughter.

“I
love
you
very
much.

Never
forget
that.”

    • “I
love
you
too,
Daddy.”

Valen<ne
looked
up
at
him.

“Are
you
sure
dying
means
you
can’t
ever
come
back?”
Julian
shuddered.

“If
I
ever
did,
it
wouldn’t
be
me.

Promise
you’ll
never
try
to
make
me
live
again,
Valen<ne.

I
can’t
imagine
anything
more
awful.”

    • Finally,
Julian
said
his
goodbye
to
BriRany.
Can
you
lie
next
to
her
And
give
her
your
heart,
your
heart
As
well
as
your
body

    • And
can
you
lie
next
to
her
And
confess
your
love,
your
love
As
well
as
your
folly
And
can
you
kneel
before
the
king
And
say
Im
clean,
Im
clean

    • “It’s
been
good.”

Julian
closed
his
eyes
and
smiled.

“Not
what
any
of
us
expected,
but…”

    • “Is
it
ever?”

BriRany
asked.
“Probably
not.”

Julian
looked
at
Valen<ne,
who
was
engrossed
in
building
her
snowman.
But
tell
me
now,
where
was
my
fault
In
loving
you
with
my
whole
heart
Oh
tell
me
now,
where
was
my
fault
In
loving
you
with
my
whole
heart
He
let
go
of
BriRany’s
hands.

It
was
<me.

    • But
she
placed
herself
in
between
Julian
and
the
approaching
figure
of
Death.

“BriRany.”

Julian’s
face
had
no
emo<on.

“You
can’t
fight
him.”
“I
want
to.”

She
stared
directly
ahead.

“I
want
you
to
live.”
“I
can’t.”

    • “I
know.

But
it
doesn’t
stop
me
from
wan<ng
it,
love.”

    • So
Julian
didn’t
fight.

He
took
his
bag,
accepted
his
drink,
and
walked
forward
into
the
warmth.

    • Next
<me
on
An
Apocalypse
of
Ice:
+
In
game,
Will
is
having
a
happy
life
in
his
own
house
and
going
to
work
every
day.

But
what’s
he
supposed
to
do
aWer
breaking
out
of
prison?

And
in
the
game,
what
will
the
consequences
be
for
the
job?


+
What
will
the
family
do
when
Will
goes
into
hiding?
+
Starklets,
ranging
from
infancy
to
childhood.

Could
they
be
any
cuter?

Yes,
they
could,
once
they
get
proper
makeovers.

In
any
event,
they’re
geYng
old
enough
to
go
on
playdates.

Awwwwwww


    • Guest
starring:
+
Ferdinand
Penguino
(The
Penguino
Legacy)
+
Magellan
Penguino
(The
Penguino
Legacy)
+
Ursula
Fitzhugh
(A
Villainous
Apocalypse)
And
a
cameo
by
SimMarina.
I
especially
like
having
Ferd
and
Mag
around.

In
addi<on
to
being
excellent
at
causing
mayhem,
they’re
half‐brothers
to
Will,
Arthur,
and
Sabriel.

So
take
that,
Piper—Will’s
family
did
come
for
him!


    • Credits:
Music
–
“White
Blank
Page,”
Mumford
&
Sons.
Anybody
who
says
that
Julian
wasn’t
a
true
Stark
will
be
thrown
into
the
Pit.

Need
I
say
more?
Interroga<on
scenes
–
see
generally
Richard
J.
Ofshe
&
Richard
A.
Leo,
The
Decision
to
Confess
Falsely:
RaEonal
Choice
and
IrraEonal
AcEon,
74
DENV.
U.
L.
REV.
979
(1997).

This
ar<cle
contains
a
lot
of
transcripts
from
actual
interroga<ons
to
demonstrate
why
innocent
suspects
confess.

I
used
those
transcripts
to
lend
extra
veracity
to
Will’s
interroga<on.
There
is
one
crucial
difference
between
the
ar<cle
and
this
chapter,
though:
In
the
real
world,
Will
would
have
had
Miranda
rights.

    • I’m
not
sure
why
Sabriel
didn’t
impale
Sanjay
Ramaswami
for
pulling
this
stunt.

Also,
Brody,
I’m
really
sorry
about
your
ouoit.
Happy
Simming!