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    Apocalypse of Ice Chapter 13 Apocalypse of Ice Chapter 13 Presentation Transcript

    • Previously
on
An
Apocalypse
of
Ice:
Basically…there’s
trouble
in
Winterfell.
We’ll
start
with
the
good
stuff:
Will
came
back
home
and
found
a
job
in
the
Gamer
track.

Jan
liBed
Science.

The
two
of
them
seem
to
be
geEng
along
surprisingly
well,
much
to
Julian’s
consternaHon,
since
he
goes
around
the
house
worrying.

Jan
is
pregnant
with
twins.

But
when
Brandon
passed
away,
everything
went
to
pieces
when
Piper
pulled
a
coup
and
declared
himself
the
Law.

In
an
unfortunately
idealisHc
mood,
Will
agreed
to
a
trial
before
a
judge
who
did
everything
she
could
to
hurt
the
Starks,
including
holding
Sabriel
in
contempt
of
court.

To
make
things
even
worse,
Sansa
turned
up
again
to
support
Piper.

So
it
wasn’t
any
wonder
that
Lucia
eventually
backed
up
Piper
aBer
a
two‐day
show
trial.


Now
what?

    • He
never
ever
saw
it
coming
at
all
 He
never
ever
saw
it
coming
at
all
It’s
all
right,
it’s
all
right,
it’s
all
right,
it’s
all
right...
 I’m
the
hero
of
this
story
 I
don’t
need
to
be
saved
 “Hero”
–
Regina
Spektor

    • As
they
approached
the
house,
Chris
was
trying
to
be
opHmisHc.

“We
have
to
remember
that
the
law
wasn’t
always
with
us,”
she
said.

“SomeHmes
there
was
no
law.

When
the
Freys
were
in
power,
what
was
leB
of
it
was
working
against
us.

But—“

    • “Oh,
that’s
great,
Mom.

Why
don’t
we
go
back
to
the
days
before
we
had
showers
or
food
while
we’re
at
it,
just
because
we
can
survive
them?”

Sabriel
snapped.

“I’ve
got
half
a
mind
to—“


    • “We
need
to
sHck
together,”
Arthur
said.

“This
isn’t
going
to
be
easy,
even
if
we’re—“
He
stopped
as
they
came
in
view
of
the
doorstep.



    • “Hello,
family.”

Sansa
stood
on
the
front
porch,
giving
them
what
she
probably
thought
was
a
cordial
wave.
“Get
off
our
doorstep
right
now,
before
I
slap
you,
too,”
Sabriel
said.

    • “Oh,
Sabriel,
why
would
you
do
that?

I
only
want
to
help
you.”

Sansa
walked
down
the
stairs
and
extended
her
hands,
as
if
to
hug
her
great‐granddaughter.
“You’ve
helped
us
enough.”

Sabriel
pushed
her
away
before
Sansa
could
touch
her.

“What
the
hell
do
you
want?”

    • 
“I
want
to
make
it
be[er.

I
know
how
hard
this—“
“How
hard?

You’re
the
one
who
did
this
to
us!

If
it
wasn’t
for
you,
we’d
be
fine!”

Will
wasn’t
so
sure
of
that,
but
he
held
his
tongue.

    • “And
you
will
be
fine
again,
if
you
just
do
as
I
say,”
Sansa
said.

“I
can
make
Pius
go
away.

Everything
will
stop.

And
you
will
be
allowed
to
go
back
to
being
the
Laws.

You
only
have
to
do
one
small
thing.”
“That
doesn’t
make
any
sense.”

Chris
crossed
her
arms.

“You’ve
gone
out
of
your
way
to
put
Piper
into
power,
and
now
you
want
him
to
go
away?”

    • Sansa
laughed.

“He
thinks
he’s
so
important
now,
with
his
fancy
Htle
and
his
crisp
suits.

I
could
almost
believe
it
myself.

But
everything
he
does,
I’ve
whispered
in
his
ear.

He
does
everything
I
tell
him
to
do.

The
only
thing
I
want
is
the
heirship.

Turn
it
back
to
me,
and
your
children
can
be
whatever
Law
they
want.”

She
scanned
the
family,
and
her
eyes
landed
on
Will.

“Well?

It’s
on
you.

What
do
you
say?”


    • “This
is
what
I
want,”
Will
said.

He
stared
into
space
instead
of
looking
at
Sansa,
though.

“Being
the
heir
is
what
I
want.”


    • “Really?

I’m
surprised.

You’ve
done
a
remarkably
bad
job
at
it
so
far.

I
see
you’re
about
to
bring
in
the
next
generaHon,
but
when
that’s
your
only
success
next
to
all
the
failures
you’ve
had
already…”
Sansa
shook
her
head.

“Maybe
I
should
be
ashamed
to
be
related
to
you.

Anyway,
I
know
you’ll
want
to
think
about
this.

I’ll
be
back
in
three
days
for
your
answer,
and
as
a
showing
of
good
faith,
Pius
will
leave
you
alone
for
those
three
days.

If
you
want
your
posiHons
back…consider
my
offer.”


    • “So.

What
do
we
do?”

Will
asked,
trying
to
put
on
a
showing
of
leadership
even
though
he
had
no
idea
what
to
do.

Sansa
was
right,
wasn’t
she?

Will
hadn’t
realized
just
how
enormous
being
the
heir
was
unHl
this
moment.

He
had
thought
he
was
handling
it
on
that
day
when
he
picked
Arthur
and
Sabriel.

But
he
had
failed.


    • “There’s
doing
what
she
says,”
Jan
began.


    • “No,”
he
heard
Sabriel
saying.

“That
is
not
an
opHon.

I
can’t
believe
you
even
suggested
it.”
“We
have
to
consider
all
possible—“
“That’s
not
even
a
possible
thing
to
do.

We
are
not
giving
up.

Are
we,
Will?”

    • “No,”
he
said,
as
anyone
faced
with
Sabriel
at
that
moment
would
do.

“Well,
we
can’t.

We’ve
come
this
far.

We’ve
spent
all
our
lives
preparing
for
this.

So
have
you,”
Will
said,
focusing
on
his
mom
and
uncle.

“I
don’t
know
what
to
do,
but
we
can’t
let
her
win.

We
need
to
see
this
through.”

    • “We
need
more
informaHon,”
Chris
said.

“We
know
what
she
wants
us
to
do.

What
happens
if
we
don’t
do
it?”
“And
what’s—Piper
going
to
do?”
Will
asked.

He
hated
menGoning
his
adversary’s
name.

It
felt
like
doing
it
would
summon
him
into
his
home.

    • “That’s
it?

We’re
just
going
to
wait?”
Sabriel
asked,
standing
up.
“We’re
going
to
watch
and
learn,”
Chris
said.

“Rushing
into
things
made
things
worse.

What’s
done
is
done,
Will,”
she
said,
turning
to
her
oldest
son.

“But
when
it’s
Hme
to
fight
again,
we
have
to
be
ready
for
it
so
that
we’ll
win.

And
that
includes
going
back
to
school
and
working
toward
your
liBs.

So
please
promise
me
not
to
do
anything
stupid,
Sabriel.”

    • “Fine.”
“You
haven’t
promised,”
Will
pointed
out.
“Do
you
have
to
rub
it
in?

Fine.

I
promise
not
to
do
anything
stupid.”

Not
that
they
had
defined
“stupid,”
but
Sabriel
had
learned
enough
from
the
show
trial
that
she
didn’t
menHon
it.



    • Before
anyone
else
started
talking,
Sabriel
spoke
up
again:
“As
long
as
you
all
promise,
too.”

She
looked
straight
at
Jan
as
she
said
that.


    • Starling,
now
I
am
shut
out
and
confined
 Even
within
my
nest
What,
what
does
it
take
to
make
it
through
another
day?
 If
a
feather
lined
with
his
words
becomes
a
blade?
 “Starling”
–
Tori
Amos

    • “Don’t.”

Sabriel
could
almost
see
Piper
in
front
of
her,
his
face
twisted
with
agony
instead
of
with
glib
triumph.

“You
win.

I’ll
give
you
anything
that
you
want…”


    • “You’re
not
giving
me
anything,”
Sabriel
said
out
loud
as
she
aimed
her
dart.

“You
can’t
give
me
something
that
was
never
yours.”
Sabriel
smiled
and
let
her
dart
go.

    • Her
aim
was
a
li[le
bit
off,
but
what
did
it
ma[er
when
her
dart
sHll
sailed
through
the
pupil
of
his
malicious
green
eye?

    • But
Sabriel’s
saHsfacHon
faded
as
she
conHnued
to
look
at
the
dartboard.

It
wasn’t
really
Piper’s
face.

It
was
nothing
more
than
the
same
dartboard
she
had
played
on
for
two
and
a
half
years.
“It’s
not
enough,”
she
said,
heading
forward
to
pick
up
her
dart
and
try
to
hit
the
bulls‐eye.

    • “Sabriel?”

Arthur
asked,
having
just
come
up
the
stairs.

    • She
paused
before
grabbing
her
dart.

“I
was
just
playing,”
Sabriel
said,
even
though
Arthur
didn’t
need
that
explained
to
him.

    • Arthur
nodded.

Usually,
he
would
have
smiled.

He
had
barely
cracked
a
smile
since
they
came
back
to
Winterfell,
though,
and
the
light
had
gone
out
of
his
eyes.

“I
was
just
heading
to
bed,”
he
said.

    • “All
right.”

Sabriel
smiled
back
at
him,
hoping
he
would
return
it.

“Good
night.”

    • Arthur
walked
away
and
climbed
into
bed,
closing
his
eyes
before
he
pulled
the
comforter
over
him.

    • But
Sabriel
kept
playing,
even
aBer
she
had
taken
her
evening
shower
and
should
have
gone
to
bed.

One
more
hit
would
be
enough.

One
more
aBer
that
one
would
be
enough.

    • Eventually,
Sabriel
looked
at
the
beaten‐up
dartboard
and
decided
she
had
be[er
go
to
sleep.

Deep
down,
though,
she
knew
it
could
never
be
enough
unHl
she
took
control
again.

    • Part
of
the
problem
was
that
someone
had
broken
into
Arthur
and
Sabriel’s
house
while
they
were
gone
and
stolen
both
their
hot
tub
and
their
TV.

    • “No
one’s
dared
break
into
our
house
since
my
grandmother
was
a
child,”
Sabriel
had
ranted.

“And
now
this?

Arthur
loves
that
hot
tub,
and
as
much
as
I
complained
about
how
stupid
the
Pleasant
sisters
were,
I
wanted
to
see
the
next
episode.

At
least
it’d
take
my
mind
off
the
Law
thing.

It
might
even
be
for
the
be[er
that
I
haven’t
been
able
to
get
my
hands
on
any
of
the
laws
that
Piper’s
been
passing.

That
burglar
would
have
taken
them,
too.”

    • The
hot
tub
probably
would
have
at
least
distracted
Arthur.

Now,
there
was
nowhere
to
retreat,
and
it
didn’t
seem
like
there
was
anything
he
could
do
to
take
the
Law
back.

    • Chess
replaced
the
hot
tub
as
Arthur’s
distracHon.

He
moved
the
pieces
as
mechanically
as
Sabriel
threw
her
darts.

    • “Really?

You
want
to
be
playing
this
game?”

Sabriel
asked,
siEng
down
across
from
him.

“You
have
all
the
logic
points
you
need.

What
more
do
you
want
from
it?”

    • “I
feel
like
I
let
you
down,”
Arthur
said
to
Sabriel.

    • “You
didn’t,”
Sabriel
said.

She
looked
down
at
the
chessboard.

Will–

“Nobody
let
us
down,”
she
corrected
herself.

“This
happened
because
Piper’s
a
manipulaHve
bastard
who
needs
to
die
in
a
fire.”

    • “There’s
a
surprisingly
pleasant
thought,”
Arthur
mu[ered.

“Well,
as
long
as
you’re
not
going
to
do
it.”

    • “Relax.

I
promised
not
to
do
anything
stupid.

I
don’t
think
seEng
fire
to
the
building
with
Piper
in
it
is
all
that
stupid,
but
Mom
probably
would.

I’m
more
worried
about
you,”
Sabriel
said.
“I’m
fine.”
“No.

You’re
not.

You’ve
barely
cracked
a
smile
since
we
got
back
here,
and
that’s
not
fine.

I’m
starHng
to
wonder
if
somebody’s
replaced
your
brain
in
the
middle
of
the
night.”

    • Arthur
looked
down.

“You’re
not
fine,
either.

How
is
either
one
of
us
supposed
to
be
okay?”
“We’re
not.

But
you’re
not
supposed
to
be
a
robot
version
of
yourself,
either.

Just—try
to
be
happy,
okay?

I
don’t
know
how
to
take
care
of
you.”
“I
will,”
Arthur
said.

“Thanks,
I
guess.”

    • “You’re
welcome.

Now,
go
find
Sullivan
or
something.

The
two
of
you
must
have
a
class
together
this
semester.

There
can’t
be
that
many
drama
students.”

Sabriel
gave
Arthur
a
hug.

“If
you
need
a
pillow
fight,
let
me
know.”

    • Sabriel
was
probably
right.

She
was
right
almost
all
the
Hme,
though.

Arthur
considered
making
that
his
term
paper
and
se[led
for
“how
being
around
people
who
are
drasHcally
different
than
me
helps
me
be
a
be[er
actor.”

    • In
the
meanHme,
Sabriel
had
to
fend
off
the
cow’s
advances.
“I’m
not
your
baby,”
she
said,
throwing
her
hands
up.

“Do
you
see
any
kids
in
this
house?”

    • Sullivan
wound
up
being
the
one
who
found
Arthur,
not
the
other
way
around.

“Sullivan!

I
was
just
about
to
go
looking
for
you!”

“Good
thing
I
came
by,
then.

How
are
you?”

    • “Well—”
Arthur
stopped.

“I’ve
been
trying
to
get
caught
up.

Professors
don’t
like
it
when
you
miss
final
performances.

And
Sabriel
and
I
have
been
kind
of
lonely
around
here.

We’ve
had
a
few
people
turn
up,
but
not
the
kind
of
study
sessions
we’re
all
used
to.”

    • “Arthur,
you’re
telling
me
about
everything
but
your
emergency
trip
to
Winterfell
right
before
final
exams,”
Sullivan
said.

“What
happened?”



    • “I…I’m
not
the
Law
anymore.”
“What?”
Arthur
explained
what
had
happened
during
the
trial.

“I
don’t
have
any
idea
what
we’re
going
to
do,”
he
said.

“I
feel
like
if
only
I’d
argued
it
be[er,
maybe
something
different
would
have
happened.

But
it
never
would
have
gone
any
differently.”

    • “No,
it
doesn’t
sound
like
it
would
have.

But
I’m
going
to
help
get
this
back
for
you,
okay?

Tell
me
what
I
can
do,
and
I’ll
do
it,”
Sullivan
said.

    • “Thanks.”

Arthur
finally
smiled
again.

    • As
long
as
Sabriel
was
playing
matchmaker,
she
thought
it
might
be
a
good
idea
to
actually
get
to
know
Sullivan
a
li[le
bit.

In
general,
she
approved,
because
he
made
Arthur
happy.

    • True,
Sullivan
didn’t
clean
up
his
dishes,
but
that
meant
Sabriel
got
to
wash
them
instead.

This
would
be
a
good
point
for
when
they
were
all
going
to
live
together,
assuming
that
was
sHll
the
plan.

    • “So,
when
are
you
going
to
ask
him
to
marry
you?”
Sabriel
asked
Arthur.

    • “I
don’t
know
if
he
wants
to,”
Arthur
said.

“I
haven’t
been
able
to
ask
Sullivan
what
his
lifeHme
want
is
yet.

I
really
hope
it’s
not
something
like
20
Lovers.”

    • “Of
course
he
wants
to.

I
can
tell.

He
finally
made
you
happy,
and
what
more
could
you
want?

Even
if
he
wants
twenty
lovers,
I
can
tell
that
he
loves
you.

Just
do
it.”



    • Arthur
smiled
again
and
decided
not
to
argue.

“So,
let
me
turn
the
quesHon
on
you,”
he
said
instead.

“When
are
you
going
to
marry
that
cow
who’s
so
into
you?”

    • “Never.”

    • Brandon
came
out
to
haunt
the
night
aBer
Arthur
and
Sabriel
went
back
to
college.

When
Chris
saw
him,
she
expected
him
to
be
angry.

Instead,
though,
Brandon
floated
by
before
vanishing
into
Mal’s
old
surgery
machine.





    • “Nice
to
see
you,
too,”
Chris
said.

She
almost
said
something
to
Brandon’s
ghost
about
how
Arthur
and
Sabriel
weren’t
the
Law
anymore.

Instead,
Chris
found
herself
thinking
about
what
it
would
be
like
to
be
a
ghost
like
Brandon:
floaHng
up
the
stairs
to
the
top
floor
without
any
effort
at
all
and
looking
in
on
her
descendants
whenever
she
felt
like
taking
a
trip
back
from
the
world
of
the
dead.

They
would
grow
up
so
quickly
when
she
was
only
with
them
in
spirit,
wouldn’t
they?

    • “Not
much
longer,
Mal,”
she
said
to
the
darkness,
imagining
that
her
husband
was
playing
mahjong
with
her.



    • Julian
spent
his
Hme
working
out
when
he
wasn’t
serving
as
EducaHon
Minister.

Over
the
last
few
days,
he
had
realized
that
he
was
ridiculously
out
of
shape,
so
a
li[le
exercise
couldn’t
hurt.

Julian
would
never
look
quite
like
he
did
as
a
young
boy,
but
he
wanted
to
be
fit
again.



    • As
for
Will
and
Jan,
they
tried
to
go
on
as
if
they
were
a
normal
heir
and
spouse,
preparing
for
the
birth
of
their
children.



    • “I
am
so
hungry.”

Jan
bent
down
so
that
it
wouldn’t
take
as
long
between
cuEng
the
omele[e
and
being
able
to
eat
it.

“As
weird
as
it’s
going
to
be
to
raise
twins,
I
can’t
wait
unHl
they’re
born.”

    • “Me
neither,”
Will
said.

“They’re
going
to
be
great.

I
know
it.

I
already
helped
my
sister
through
her
toddler
years,
and
it
can’t
be
worse
than
that,
can
it?”

He
laughed.

    • Jan
laughed
automaHcally.

SomeHmes,
being
around
Will
made
her
feel
like
a
teenager
who
had
just
chosen
the
Romance
aspiraHon
again.

It
almost
felt
like
she
didn’t
have
to
worry
about
anything
anymore,
even
though
there
was
so
much
to
worry
about.


First
among
those
things
is
that
both
those
babies
are
going
to
have
brown
hair,
and
you’re
a
blonde
now,
Jan’s
thoughts
told
her.

He’ll
never
believe
you.

People
can’t
change
their
hair
color
anymore.

    • She
changed
the
subject
instead.

“How
can
you
keep
smiling?

Do
you
have
a
plan
for
when
Sansa
turns
up
again?”

Jan
shouldn’t
have
been
scared,
either.

Will
probably
thought
she
was
a
coward.

“No.

I
don’t.”

Will
looked
at
his
salad.

“I’m
going
to
say
no,
but
I
don’t
know
what
else
to
do.”


“Then
why
are
you
so
happy?”

    • “Because
I
worry
a
lot,
but
I
sHll
can’t
worry
all
the
Hme,”
Will
said.

“I
like
being
with
you,
and
I’m
looking
forward
to
meeHng
the
twins.

There’s
a
lot
that
I’m
not
good
at
as
heir.

A
lot
of
it
was
things
I
didn’t
even
know
I
needed
to
be
good
at.”

He
signed.

“I
didn’t
think
it
was
going
to
be
like
this.”

    • “But
you
make
me
happy,
Jan,”
Will
conHnued.

“And
about
the
other
stuff,
I
just
have
to
remember
that
we’ve
survived
worse.”
“Me
too.”

    • Outside,
Julian
ate
his
TV
dinner
by
the
stove
and
tried
not
to
look
in
at
his
nephew
and
his
new
wife.

    • “I
have
got
to
get
out
of
here,”
he
said
to
himself,
trying
not
to
shiver
out
in
the
cold.

    • I
have
taken
a
wrong
turn
When
will
I
learn?

When
will
I
learn?
 Should
I
show
them
all
my
scars?
 Cherry
red,
bleeding
burn
 But
if
I
look
to
my
right
 Will
I
see
the
one
I
fight
for?
 “Locked
Up”
–
Ingrid
Michaelson

    • To
no
one’s
surprise,
Julian
told
Will
the
next
day
that
he
was
going
to
move
out.
“I
know
this
isn’t
exactly
a
good
Hme,”
Julian
said.

“But
it’s
probably
never
going
to
be
a
good
Hme.

If
I
don’t
move
out
now,
I’ll
never
will.

And
I
need
to
see
my
daughter
grow
up.”



    • Will
nodded.

“You
don’t
have
to
ask
my
permission
to
go.”
“I’m
not.

I
was
telling
you
that
I’m
going.”
“Good.

That’d
be
weird
if
you
were.

I’ll
miss
you,
but…”

    • “Oh,
you
don’t
have
to
say
it,”
Julian
said.

“It’s
Hme
for
me
to
get
out
and
leave
you
and
Jan
so
you
can
stop
trying
to
hide
in
dark
corners.”
Will
changed
the
subject:
“This
isn’t
the
last
Hme
we’re
going
to
see
you,
is
it?”
“Of
course
not.

I’ll
come
back
tomorrow
night
when
my
grandmother
turns
up
again.

Besides,
if
you
figure
out
the
thing
with
the
phones
any
Hme
soon,
then
we
can
see
each
other
as
oBen
as
we
want.”

    • Meanwhile,
Chris
turned
the
page
of
her
book
and
smiled.

She
had
just
earned
her
last
skill
point.

    • So
Julian
finished
saying
goodbye
to
Will
and
to
Chris.

He
would
have
said
goodbye
to
Jan,
too,
but
she
was
sleeping.

Besides,
it
wouldn’t
do
any
good
to
say
goodbye
to
Jan.

She
probably
wanted
him
gone
as
much
as
he
wanted
to
leave.

    • He
didn’t
have
anything
worth
packing,
so
Julian
just
walked
over
to
Bri[any’s
house.

It
would
be
his
house
now,
too,
he
told
himself.

    • ABer
puEng
ValenHne
to
bed
and
hoping
that
she
would
sleep
through
the
night,
Julian
and
Bri[any
got
married
in
a
quick
ceremony
in
the
nursery.

    • As
happy
as
she
was
to
finally
marry
Julian,
Bri[any
wished
that
they
could
have
more
Hme
together.

Unfortunately,
the
Grim
Reaper
probably
wouldn’t
listen
when
he
came
to
collect
Julian,
but
it
would
be
nice
if
she
could
defeat
him
like
characters
in
the
stories
did.

    • “Well,
hello.

It’s
been
too
long
since
the
last
Hme
I
saw
you,”
Julian
said
to
ValenHne.
“Daddy!”

    • “And
now
you’re
talking!”

Julian
gave
ValenHne
a
hug.

“Stay.”
“I
will,
sweetheart.”

    • Bri[any
had
been
teaching
ValenHne
how
to
walk.

Her
daughter
did
look
creepy
enough
someHmes
that
she
wondered
if
teaching
ValenHne
to
walk
was
actually
a
good
idea,
but
she
couldn’t
just
let
ValenHne
crawl
for
all
her
life,
could
she?

    • Besides,
ValenHne
would
start
looking
cute
again
within
a
few
minutes,
anyway.

    • She
also
sHll
couldn’t
handle
stairs,
so
there
was
a
limit
on
how
much
havoc
she
could
wreak.

    • Julian
took
care
of
toilet
training.

He
was
definitely
relieved
when
it
was
done,
since
it
was
highly
unlikely
that
he’d
ever
po[y
train
anyone
else.

    • “We
could
always
try
for
another
one,”
Bri[any
suggested
while
out
the
door
to
her
job
as
a
patrol
officer.
“As
fun
as
the
trying
might
be,
I
wouldn’t
be
able
to
keep
up
with
another
kid.”

Julian
shook
his
head.

    • “As
adorable
as
she
is…I’m
geSng
too
old.”

    • ABer
Julian
moved
out,
Chris
approached
Will.

“I
should
say
goodbye
to
you,”
she
said.

    • Will
looked
down.

“Not
you,
too,”
he
said.

“I
don’t
want
to
lose
both
you
and
Dad
so
quickly.

I
can’t—”



    • “No.

You
can.”

Chris
kissed
Will
on
the
cheek.

“I
know
it’s
not
going
to
be
easy,
but
you
can
do
this.”

    • Will,
Jan,
and
Chris
invited
Arthur,
Sabriel,
and
their
friends
over
for
their
usual
Tuesday
gathering.

More
people
refused
their
invitaHons
than
usual,
but
they
sHll
managed
to
get
a
good
crowd.

    • Sullivan
came
with
them
and
proceeded
to
Hckle
Chris.
“Hey!

I’m
too
old
for
this!”

she
protested,
but
she
couldn’t
stop
laughing.

“You
really
are
just
like
Arthur.”

    • Will
also
took
a
moment
to
catch
up
with
his
former
math
professor
about
goings‐on
at
the
college.

He
also
couldn’t
quite
get
his
lifeHme
want
out
of
his
head,
despite
the
fact
that
Jan
was
siEng
right
behind
him.

    • In
the
middle
of
their
conversaHon,
Jan
put
down
her
romance
novel,
waved
her
arm
in
the
air,
and
went
into
labor.
“You’re
going
to
be
fine.

Just
spin
and
twirl,”
Arthur
counseled
Jan.

“Will?

You
might
want
to
start
paying
a[enHon
now.”
“OW!”

Jan
screamed.

    • “You’re
having
the
babies
now?”

Will
asked.

He
had
thought
he
was
ready
for
fatherhood,
but
he
wasn’t
ready
now!
“Yes,
Will,
she
is,”
Arthur
answered
before
Jan
could
threaten
to
defenestrate
Will.

Even
on
the
first
story,
that
would
hurt.

    • Before
long,
though,
Jan
had
delivered
the
older
twin
and
handed
her
to
Will.
“She’s
beauHful,”
Arthur
said,
leaning
in
to
look
at
the
baby.

“What
are
you
going
to
name
her?”
“Depends
on
whether
she’s
about
to
get
a
brother
or
a
sister,”
Will
said.

“Gemma
if
her
twin’s
a
girl,
and
Hester
if
her
twin’s
a
boy.”



    • Jan
gave
birth
to
the
younger
twin
a
few
minutes
later,
another
girl.

She
named
the
new
baby
Meg.

    • It
felt
like
everyone
was
looking
at
Jan
and
trying
to
figure
out
how
she
had
given
birth
to
a
brown‐haired
baby.

Why
was
Sabriel
giving
her
that
look?

She
was
accusing
her,
wasn’t
she?

Couldn’t
her
sister‐in‐law
just
open
her
mouth,
like
she
usually
did,
instead
of
looking
at
Jan
like
she
knew
her
secret
and
would
announce
it
at
the
worst
possible
Hme?


    • Will
had
the
same
quesHon
on
his
mind
as
he
turned
away
from
the
crowd,
holding
baby
Gemma.

What
li[le
hair
on
her
head
was
unmistakably
brown,
not
red
or
blonde.

How
could
that
be
possible?

Was
Gemma
really
his
daughter?

    • So
Will
stood
around
with
a
glazed
look
on
his
face
as
he
held
Gemma,
not
really
hearing
anyone
who
congratulated
him
on
the
birth
of
the
girls.
Meanwhile,
Chris
said
her
goodbyes
to
both
Sabriel
and
Arthur.


“I
know
I
told
you
not
to
do
anything
stupid,”
she
said
to
Sabriel,
“but
I
wish
I
could
be
there
when
you
finally
drop‐kick
Piper
and
make
him
sorry
for
everything
he’s
done.”

    • “Same
goes
for
you,”
Chris
told
Arthur.

“Take
the
Law
back.

Be
brave.

And
make
sure
Sabriel’s
not
stuck
in
that
dress
for
the
rest
of
her
life.”

    • Chris
was
going
to
spend
some
Hme
with
her
granddaughters,
but
aBer
picking
up
Meg
and
giving
her
a
cuddle,
she
felt
her
Hme
running
out
faster
than
she
could
make
it
to
the
family
plot.



    • She
set
Meg
down
on
the
doorstep.

Death’s
scythe
hung
over
Meg’s
body,
and
the
otherworldly
black
cloud
that
followed
him
around
billowed
around
her.

    • “I’m
not
ready,”
Chris
said.
The
Grim
Reaper
didn’t
speak.

Chris
looked
around,
but
she
couldn’t
see
clearly
anymore.

    • “Well,
I
finally
get
to
see
Mal
again,”
Chris
said,
accepHng
her
drink
and
picking
up
her
suitcase.



    • “There.

Let’s
get
you
in
out
of
the
cold,”
Jan
said
to
Meg,
bringing
her
inside
and
feeding
her
a
bo[le.

“That
can’t
be
good
for
you.”

    • Will
took
Gemma
upstairs
to
her
crib
and
let
out
a
sob.

There
wasn’t
anybody
leB
who
could
help
him
now.

How
was
he
supposed
to
deal
with
his
kids
having
a
different
father
on
top
of
everything
else?

He
had
to
get
away.

    • Arthur
and
Sabriel
kept
things
going
as
well
as
they
could
in
Will’s
absence.

Sabriel
even
had
a
brief
encounter
with
her
dad’s
ghost.

Mal
didn’t
say
anything,
but
it
sHll
felt
like
he
approved
of
Sabriel.

    • Meanwhile,
aBer
Jan
put
Gemma
to
bed,
she
and
Arthur
played
with
Meg.

Meg
seemed
parHcularly
fascinated
by
Jan’s
robot
hand.

    • Yet
Will
kept
walking,
sHll
bewildered.

    • But
I
look
at
you,
warm
in
your
dream
 While
the
mobile
dances
above
 And
I
think
to
myself
it’s
a
beauGful
night
 And
I
know
everything’s
going
to
be
all
right
 Yes,
now
I
know
it’ll
be
all
right
“Everything’ll
Be
All
Right
(Will’s
Lullaby)”
–
Joshua
Radin

    • The
trip
to
the
spa
had
not
been
Sabriel’s
idea.

    • Arthur
had
suggested
it
as
a
way
to
get
off
campus
and
relax.

Even
though
the
spa
was
closer
to
their
family’s
home
than
it
was
to
Oldtown,
he
felt
like
it
was
ages
away
from
any
of
their
problems.

    • Sabriel
got
her
kicks
by
dancing
upstairs.

She
didn’t
feel
like
she
was
a
very
good
dancer,
but
nobody
was
watching,
so
it
didn’t
ma[er.

Even
if
they
were
watching,
it
wouldn’t
have
ma[ered.

    • She
also
played
poker
with
two
townies
and
a
dormie.

They
seemed
happy
enough
to
play
against
Sabriel
at
first,
but
at
her
first
menHon
of
Piper,
they
made
themselves
scarce.

    • Spencer
Fitzhugh
was
a
lot
more
sympatheHc.
“I
heard
about
the
trial,”
he
said,
shuffling
the
cards.

“That
never
should
have
happened.”

    • “No
kidding.”

Arthur
looked
down
at
his
cards,
remembering
how
he
had
felt
right
aBer
coming
back
from
the
trial.

“I
haven’t
given
up.

Sabriel
and
I
are
going
to
take
the
Law
back,
eventually.

We’re
just
not
sure
how
to
do
it.”

    • “Well,
let
me
know
if
there’s
anything
I
can
do.

If
there’s
a
revoluHon,
though,
the
best
person
to
help
you
would
probably
be
my
granddaughter,
Ursula.

I
take
it
you
know
her?”

Spencer
added
when
he
saw
Arthur
smile.

    • “Yeah.

She
called
me
up
in
a
rage
right
aTer
the
trial.

I
was
kind
of
scared
about
what
would
happen
when
she
met
Sabriel.”

    • “Sounds
like
her.”

Spencer
looked
at
his
cards
and
smiled.

“I’ll
also
see
if
I
can
introduce
you
to
my
grandson,
Teagan.

He’s
been
saying
he’d
like
to
meet
you
before
this
whole
business
started.”

    • “Really?

I
have
a
fan
already?”

Arthur
asked.


“You
could
say
that.”

    • Back
at
Winterfell,
Sabriel’s
relaHonship
with
the
cow
had
progressed
from
rejecHng
flirts
to
ventrilo‐farHng
and
poking.

It
was
probably
for
the
be[er
that
she
got
to
take
her
anger
out
on
someone.

    • Arthur
and
Sabriel
had
another
visitor
aBer
they
came
to
the
spa:
a
nervous
Jocelyn
Morgan.
“I
need
your
help,”
she
said.

“Is
it
safe?”
“Our
help?”

Arthur
asked.

“We’re
not
the
Law
anymore.

I
don’t
know
how
much—”
“No!

I
won’t
go
to
Piper!

Not
when
he’s
in
league
with—”
“Who?”

    • “S‐Sansa.”

Jocelyn
shuddered.

“If
she’s
watching,
she’ll
kill
me.

I
know
it.”
“How?”
“She
k‐killed
my
wife.”

    • “That’s—”
Arthur
didn’t
know
what
to
say.

“That’s
horrible.”
“It
is.

I
wish
it
had
never
happened.

But
you’re
sGll
going
to
confront
her,
aren’t
you?”

Arthur
got
the
sense
that
Jocelyn
was
looking
right
through
him.
“We
don’t
have
a
choice.

She’s
turning
up
in
just
a
day
to
ask
Will
to
give
up
the
heirship.”

    • “But
you
need
to
know
what
she’s
capable
of.”

Jocelyn
definitely
wasn’t
looking
at
Arthur.

“You
all
need
to
know.

I
wish
I’d
known.”

    • Jan
and
Will
sHll
weren’t
talking.

They
skilled
separately.

Will
wasn’t
proud
of
how
he
had
reacted
to
his
daughters’
births
the
night
before,
so
he
didn’t
want
to
talk.

As
for
Jan,
she
just
wanted
to
avoid
a
confrontaHon.

    • “I
just
wanted
to
hide,”
Jan
said
to
Gemma.

The
baby
stared
up
at
her,
uncomprehending.

“But
you
can’t
hide
when
you’ve
married
someone
in
the
most
prominent
family
here,
can
you,
Gem?”


    • “I
know
I
haven’t
been
the
best
dad
to
you,
and
I’ve
barely
even
started,”
Will
said
to
Meg,
holding
her
close.

How
could
she
be
so
Hny?

“But
I
want
you
to
know
that
I
love
you.”

    • Will
didn’t
speak
unHl
he
waved
goodbye
to
Jan,
leEng
her
know
that
he
was
going
to
work
and
that
he
hoped
she
had
a
good
day.

She
wished
him
the
same.



    • Because
Will
was
sHll
at
work
when
the
twins’
birthdays
came
around,
Jan
bought
their
cakes
and
took
the
twins
to
them
in
turn.

    • Gemma
grew
up
first,
with
a
personality
of
8/8/9/7/1
(Aries).

    • She
proceeded
to
go
off
and
get
herself
into
trouble
while
Jan
blew
out
Meg’s
candles
for
her.

    • Something
about
Meg
seemed
more
grown‐up
than
Gemma,
so
Jan
gave
her
a
more
mature
hairstyle.

Meg’s
personality
is
7/8/4/7/6
(Taurus).


    • Meg
definitely
did
not
want
Jan
to
leave,
but
Jan
wasn’t
ready
to
give
up
her
job
just
yet.

    • Will
came
back
from
work
just
before
Jan
had
to
leave,
sHll
feeling
blue.

He
should
have
been
promoted.

He
had
all
the
skills
and
all
the
friends
that
he
needed.

His
boss
said
that
his
aEtude
was
bad,
and
maybe
it
was,
but
Will
sHll
felt
like
he
was
being
toyed
with.

    • Gemma
was
sHll
sleeping
when
Will
got
to
the
second
floor
nursery.

His
remaining
suspicions
dissipated
as
he
watched
her
sleep.

Will
could
see
almost
all
of
his
features
in
her
face.

The
brown
hair
sHll
didn’t
make
sense,
but
Gemma
was
so
plainly
Will’s
daughter
that
he
had
to
admit
he
was
wrong.



    • On
the
other
hand,
Meg
hadn’t
gone
to
bed
yet,
so
Will
took
her
out
of
her
crib
to
start
teaching
her
skills.



    • Sadly,
though,
Meg
refused
to
talk.

Whenever
it
seemed
like
Will
was
making
progress,
Meg
turned
away
and
curled
up
in
a
ball,
shaking
her
head.

    • No
promoGon,
no
Law,
Jan
probably
hates
me,
I
have
no
idea
what
to
do
when
Sansa
shows
up
again,
and
Meg
won’t
talk,
Will
thought.

And
it’s
not
like
how
Sabriel
wouldn’t
talk
just
to
be
contrary.

    • Gemma
cut
off
Will’s
thoughts
by
screaming
for
a[enHon,
not
at
all
happy
that
her
dad
was
siEng
with
Meg
while
she
had
to
be
by
herself
in
a
crib.

    • Luckily,
though,
she
seemed
to
enjoy
learning
to
walk
more
than
Meg
had
enjoyed
learning
how
to
talk.

Will
was
in
the
process
of
leading
Gemma
through
a
few
steps
when
the
doorbell
rang.

    • “Hello,”
the
newcomer
said.

“Will
Stark?”
“Yes,”
Will
said.

“What’s
your
name?”
“India
VeHnari.”

They
shook
hands.

“I’m
an
a[orney.”

    • Will
frowned
and
took
a
step
back,
his
suspicions
raised.

“You’re
not
welcome
here.”

What
did
Indy
want?

He
couldn’t
think
of
anything
but
protecHng
the
children.

“Go.”
“No.

I’m
not
one
of
Piper’s.

I’m
offering
you
help.”

    • “Why?”

Will
wanted
to
believe
him,
but
didn’t
know
if
he
could.
“Because
anyone
who
represents
himself
has
a
fool
for
a
lawyer.”
“I’m
not
represenHng
myself.

My
brother
and
sister—“

    • “Won’t
be
allowed
to
represent
you
anymore.”
“What?

Why
not?”
“Piper
says
he’s
regulaHng
the
pracHce
of
law,”
Indy
explained.

“Anyone
who
wants
to
pracHce
has
to
fill
out
an
applicaHon
and
be
approved.

I
don’t
know
if
Arthur
and
Sabriel
filed
applicaHons,
but
even
if
they
did,
they
wouldn’t
have
a
ghost
of
a
chance
of
being
approved.”

    • “That…”

Well,
so
much
for
a
“showing
of
good
faith,”
as
Sansa
had
put
it.

“What
about
you?”
“I
don’t
know
yet,
but
word
is
that
they’re
rubber‐stamping
any
applicaHons
that
don’t
have
the
name
‘Stark’
on
them.”

    • “Then
why
should
I
trust
you?”

Will
asked.

“I
want
to
trust
you,
but
I
have
to
ask.

It’s
been
going
badly
when
I
don’t
ask.”
“Because
I’m
not
going
to
give
you
some
pre[y,
meaningless
answer
to
that
quesHon,”
Indy
said.

“But
I’m
here
offering
to
represent
you,
and
no
one
else
is.”

    • When
Arthur
came
back
from
class,
he
found
Sabriel
siEng
in
the
study
area
and
watching
TV
with
a
pair
of
idenHcally
dressed
students.
“Arthur!

There
you
are.

I’d
like
you
to
meet
our
new
minions.”

    • “We
have
minions?”

Arthur
waved
anyway.

“Hey,
guys.”

    • “We’re
minions?”
one
of
the
students
asked.

“I
didn’t
know
this.”
“Neither
did
I,”
the
other
one
responded.

    • “You’ve
agreed
to
help
me
and
Arthur,
so
you’re
our
minions.

And
Arthur,
I
think
it’s
past
Hme
for
you
to
start
geEng
some
minions
of
your
own.”
“I’m
really
not
the
minion
type.

I
like
collaboraHng
with
people
instead
of
telling
them
what
to
do.”

“Admit
it,
Arthur,
you
like
being
told
what
to
do
even
be[er.”

    • “Aren’t
you
going
to
introduce
us?”

one
of
them
asked.
“I
was
geSng
around
to
it,”
Sabriel
said.

“This
is
Ferdinand—“
“I’m
Mag.”
“And
this
is
Magellan.”
“I’m
Ferd.”

    • “No,
you’re
not.”

Sabriel
shook
her
head.

“You
tried
that
on
me
yesterday.

I’m
not
falling
for
it
again.”
“No,
we’re
not,”
Ferd
confirmed.

“It’s
worth
trying
unGl
you
get
it
right,
though.”

    • 
“So,
what
are
we
doing?”

Mag
asked.

“General
mayhem?

Breaking
everything
in
Piper’s
office
that
can
possibly
be
broken?

InterrupHng
meeHngs?”
“Right
now,
we’re
just
trying
to
pass
our
classes,”

Arthur
said.

    • “And
you’re
trying
to
propose
to
your
boyfriend.

Right,
Arthur?”

Sabriel
looked
at
Arthur
for
a
minute
before
looking
back
at
Ferd
and
Mag.

“Mom
told
us
not
to
do
anything
stupid.

Breaking
everything
in
Piper’s
office
probably
qualifies.”

    • “But
your
mom’s
not
going
to
know.”
“And
she
didn’t
make
us
promise.”


“You
can’t
be
held
responsible
for
what
we
do,
right?”

    • Arthur
smiled.

“This
is
an
opHon.

Mom’s
not
around
to
see,
as
sad
as
this
is,
and
I
think
it’d
be
easy
to
pretend
we
didn’t
have
anything
to
do
with
planning
this.”
“Works
for
me,”
Sabriel
said.

    • Jocelyn
was
trying
to
put
on
a
happy
face.

Failing
that,
she
wanted
to
put
on
a
face
that
made
her
look
less
suspicious.

She
hadn’t
come
anywhere
near
recovering
from
Ali’s
death,
though.

    • “I’ll
never
let
you
go,”
she
whispered
to
Kay,
cradling
his
head
against
her
shoulder.

    • Unfortunately,
Kay
had
his
birthday
that
day,
so
Jocelyn
had
to
let
him
grow
up.

He
looked
as
excited
as
she
wished
she
felt.

If
only
there
could
be
another
child
that
she
could
raise
with
Ali.





    • If
only
she
could
protect
him
from
all
the
terrors
that
haunted
outside
the
walls
of
the
house.

It
was
such
a
cold
world.

Couldn’t
Kay
just
stay
with
her?

    • For
now,
though,
Kay
didn’t
mind
the
cold
so
much.

He
had
a
snowball
in
his
hand
and
an
enemy
to
defeat.

    • As
for
Julian,
he
could
only
spend
so
much
Hme
leEng
Kay
win
before
fighHng
back
in
earnest.

    • “Kay!

Dinner!”

Jocelyn
called
when
it
got
dark
and
her
son
sHll
hadn’t
come
back
inside.

    • “I
was
having
fun,”
Kay
said
as
he
came
into
the
kitchen,
but
he
sat
and
began
to
eat
his
sandwich
anyway.
“There’s
a
good
boy,”
Jocelyn
said,
not
seeming
to
hear
him.

“I
need
you
to
be
careful,
Kay.

Promise
me.

We
have
terrible
enemies.”
Julian
would
have
liked
to
know
what
Jocelyn
meant
by
that.

When
he
asked
later,
though,
all
she
told
him
was
that
he
needed
to
talk
to
his
nephew.

    • On
his
way
back
home,
Kay
came
out
to
say
goodbye
to
Julian.
“It
was
nice
meeHng
you,”
Julian
told
him.

“You
can
come
over
to
my
house
to
play
someHme,
if
you
want.

I
have
a
daughter
who’s
about
your
age.

Maybe
you’d
get
along.”

    • Kay
looked
up
at
Julian,
completely
serious.

“You
can’t
have
a
kid.

You’re
a
boy.

Only
girls
can
have
kids.”

    • “Yes,
we
can,”
Julian
said.

“My
brother
had
three
kids.”

He
held
his
fingers
up.
“No
way!”
“It’s
true.

You
have—had
two
moms,”
he
corrected
himself.

“But
most
people
have
both
a
mom
and
a
dad.

The
dad’s
the
boy,”
Julian
added
for
Kay’s
benefit.

    • “Just
my
mum
now.”

Kay
shivered.

“My
mama’s
dead.

My
mum
sHll
talks
to
her,
but
mama’s
not
really
there.

It’s
just
her
urn.”

    • “Right.”

Julian
thought
it
would
be
good
for
this
kid
if
he
could
get
out
of
the
house
and
play
with
ValenHne
a
li[le
bit.



    • I
took
a
knife
and
cut
out
her
eye
I
took
it
home
and
watched
it
wither
and
die
Well,
she’s
lucky
that
I
didn’t
slip
her
a
smile
 That’s
why
she
sleeps
with
one
eye
open
 That’s
the
price
she
paid
“Girl
With
One
Eye”
–
Florence
+
The
Machine

    • 
When
Julian
finally
got
through
to
Will
aBer
six
tries,
Will
had
no
idea
what
Julian
was
talking
about.
“Who’s
Jocelyn
Morgan?”

Will
asked.
“She
was
at
the
trial.

You
know,
that
blonde
who
looked
like
she
thought
Sansa
was
going
to
get
up
from
the
witness
chair
and
eat
her
alive
any
minute.”

    • “I
wasn’t
looking
at
the
people
around
us.

She
was
supposed
to
have
said
something
to
me?”

Will
asked.
“Yeah—wait.

It
might
have
been
Arthur.

I’m
coming
over
tonight
when
Sansa’s
going
to
show
up.

I’m
going
to
be
there
with
you.”


“You
are?

Are
you—“

    • “Yes.

Jan’s
going
to
be
at
work,
and
you
need
to
have
someone
with
you
besides
the
twins.

Plus,
I
want
to
meet
them.”


Julian
hung
up.

Time
to
try
geEng
in
touch
with
Arthur.

Great.

It’d
be
really
helpful
if
Will
was
having
more
luck
with
the
phones,
but
if
they
were
proving
as
intractable
as
the
educaHon
system,
Julian
might
have
to
wait
a
while.


    • This
Hme,
it
took
ten
phone
calls
before
somebody
picked
up.

“Hello?”
“Arthur!

It’s
good
to
hear
from
you.

Listen,
did
you
talk
to
Jocelyn
Morgan?“

    • “Yeah,”
Arthur
said.

“I
wasn’t
supposed
to
tell
anyone
what
happened,
but
now
that
you
menHon
it,
I
think
you
need
to
know—and
so
does
Will.

Sansa
killed
Jocelyn’s
wife.”




“Then—if
she
kills
people
when
she
doesn’t
get
what
she
wants—“
“I
didn’t
even
realize
that.”

Arthur
stared
ahead,
stunned.

“What
are
we
going
to
do?”

    • “I’m
going
to
go
to
the
house.

I’m
going
to
take
care
of
it.

You
need
to
stay
in
school,
finish
your
studies,
and
keep
going
full
speed
ahead
with
your
plans
to
bring
back
parHes
and
take
over
the
housing
market.

You
need
to
survive
this.”
“Survive
this?

Uncle
Julian—“
“You
need
to
survive
this.

I
don’t,”
he
repeated.

“Because
no
ma[er
what,
I
won’t
be
able
to
survive
this
much
longer.”
“What
do
you
mean?”

Arthur
pressed.

    • “She
has
to
die,”
Julian
said.
“No!”
“It’s
the
only
way.

Sansa’s
dangerous.

If
she’s
willing
to
kill
for
what
she
wants,
then
Will’s
life
is
in
danger.

So
is
yours.

I
can’t
let
that
happen.”
“But
she’s
your
grandmother—“
“My
grandmother’s
dead,”
Julian
said.

“I’ll
be
dead,
too.

Even
if
Piper
catches
up
with
me
before
my
Hme,
it
won’t
ma[er.

But
if
he
catches
up
with
any
of
you…”



    • He
didn’t
need
to
say
it.

“I
understand,”
Arthur
said.
Julian
tried
to
smile.

“Just
don’t
tell
Sabriel.

She’ll
want
to
do
it
herself.”

    • Ferd
and
Mag
had
done
one
be[er
than
simple
destrucHon:
they
had
brought
Sabriel
copies
of
all
the
new
laws
passed
since
Piper
seized
power.

She
scratched
her
head
and
rolled
her
eyes,
which
were
glazing
over
far
more
quickly
than
she
wanted
them
to.
“There
are
so
many
of
them,”
she
told
herself.

“How
are
we
supposed
to
keep
track
of
all
the
changes?

When
Uncle
Brandon
published
these,
he
would
say
what
the
change
was
and
what
it
meant.”



    • Instead,
Sabriel
turned
to
her
other
project.
“Pillow
fighHng.

Great.

Aren’t
they
going
to
do
anything
romanHc?”

Of
course,
she
had
to
go
to
class.

Why
was
nothing
going
well?

    • “We’re
going
to
graduate
really
soon,”
Arthur
said
to
Sullivan.

“That’s
why
I’ve
been
doing
all
that
extra
credit
work.

I
had
to
make
up
for
the
classes
I
missed
for
the
trial.”

    • Sullivan
looked
more
upset
than
he
usually
did
when
Arthur
beat
him
at
rock‐paper‐scissors.

“I’ll
miss
you,”
he
said.

    • “I’ll
miss
you,
too.

But
I
sHll
want
to
start
making
a
name
for
myself
in
Winterfell.

Then,
I’ll
come
back
here
and
give
you
a
new
haircut.”
“I
don’t
need
a
new
haircut.”
“Yes,
you
do.

You
don’t
have
to
have
hair
like
mine,
but
you
don’t
have
to
keep
plastering
your
hair
to
your
head
like
you
do
now,
either.”

    • ABer
they
had
gone
to
the
hot
tub,
Arthur
decided
that
if
he
was
going
to
do
this,
he
would
have
to
do
it
now.

“I
want
you
to
come
with
me,”
he
said.
“You
do?”
“Yeah.

You
should
get
out
of
the
hot
tub.

I
need
to
do
this
right.”

    • “Sullivan
Livingston,
will
you
marry
me?”

Arthur
asked.

“I
know
I
won’t
be
able
to
do
it
unHl
aBer
I
become
a
famous
actor,
but
we
will
have
a
big
party
once
that
happens.

I
want
you
to
come
back
to
Winterfell
with
me
instead
of
being
stuck
here
any
longer.

I
don’t
know
if
I’m
the
only
one
you’ll
want,
but
you’re
the
only
one
I
want.”

    • “I
thought
you’d
never
ask.”

Sullivan
hugged
Arthur.

“Of
course
I
will.”

    • “Of
course
he
will.

Good!”

Sabriel
congratulated
Arthur.

“I’m
happy
for
the
two
of
you.”

    • Luckily,
Arthur
had
a
chance
to
say
goodbye
to
Sullivan
before
the
taxi
came.

    • Arthur
grew
up
first.

He
usually
found
things
to
wear
that
didn’t
have
any
sleeves,
so
he
wasn’t
sure
about
wearing
a
suit,
but
at
least
he
looked
kind
of
professional.

    • Sabriel
didn’t
manage
to
escape
the
pink
enHrely,
but
she
got
to
wear
pants,
which
made
her
new
ouuit
a
vast
improvement.

    • Sansa
had
just
said
that
she
would
come
over
someHme
at
night,
so
Julian
came
back
at
about
nine
o’clock,
aBer
Will
got
back
from
his
job
and
Jan
leB
for
hers.


    • “Jan
said
she
hasn’t
come,”
Will
said
when
he
opened
the
door.

“Thanks
for
coming.

I
didn’t
know
if
I’d
be
able
to
see
you
again.”

    • “You’re
welcome.

You
shouldn’t
be
alone
for
this.”
“It
does
help,
having
you
here,”
Will
said.

“I
sHll
didn’t
have
a
plan.”

    • “Don’t
worry
about
it.

Why
don’t
you
introduce
me
to
the
girls?”

Julian
asked.

“How
can
you
be
old
enough
to
have
your
own
children?

I
remember
when
you
were
the
same
size
as
ValenHne.”


    • “Trust
me,
I
don’t
know
how
I’m
old
enough
to
be
a
father,”
Will
said
once
they
got
upstairs.

He
walked
over
to
Meg’s
crib
and
tucked
her
in.

“I
don’t
want
to
wake
her
up.

Gemma
wakes
up
if
I
so
much
as
step
on
a
floorboard
here.

Good
thing
she’s
already
up.”

    • “Same
with
ValenHne,”
Julian
said,
siEng
next
to
Gemma
as
she
played
with
her
bunny
head.

“I
think
she
wants
to
know
whenever
one
of
us
is
in
the
room
with
her
so
that
she
doesn’t
miss
out
on
a
chance
to
get
a[enHon.”


    • Will
laughed.

“I’d
never
have
thought
that
I’d
be
talking
about
my
kids
and
yours
like
this.

Like
they’d
be
the
same
age.

Well,
they
are‐‐”
Downstairs,
they
heard
Sansa
pounding
on
the
door.

    • “She
bothered
to
knock?”

Will
asked.

“I’m
surprised.”
“I
know.

I’ll
take
care
of
it.

Stay
here
with—“
Julian
paused.

“No.

Stay
here
with
the
kids.”

    • 
So
Will
waited.
“Get
out
of
my
way,”
he
heard
Sansa
say.

“My
business
is
with—“
A
shot
rang
out.



    • “Julian!”

Will
shouted.

He
ran
downstairs,
not
caring
what
his
uncle
had
said.

If
he
had
just
gone
with
his
uncle,
then
Julian
wouldn’t
have
go[en
caught
in
the
dispute,
and
he
would
sHll
be
alive.


    • But
Julian
was
alive.

Sansa
was
the
one
curled
up
in
a
ball
at
his
feet.


    • “Why
did
you
do
that?”

Will
asked.

Even
though
he
had
just
spoken
and
he
could
hear
his
daughters
crying
upstairs,
the
first
floor
seemed
completely
silent.


    • “To
save
everyone,”
Julian
said,
watching
Sansa’s
body
fade
away.

It
didn’t
leave
an
urn.

“I
had
to
do
it.”
Will
nodded.

He
didn’t
say
anything
for
what
felt
like
ages.

“It’s
over,
then?”

    • “This
part
is.”

Julian
pocketed
the
gun.

He
also
didn’t
speak
for
a
long
Hme.

When
he
finally
did,
he
said,
“I
should
go.”
“I…I
guess
you
should.”
“I’ll
try
to
come
back.”

Julian
turned
away,
then
looked
over
his
shoulder.

“Will—be
careful.”


    • Next
Hme
on
An
Apocalypse
of
Ice:
+
To
state
the
obvious:
Killing
Sansa
is
going
to
have
consequences.

I
will
leave
the
quesHons
of
“what
consequences”
and
“consequences
for
whom”
up
in
the
air,
though.
+
Arthur
and
Sabriel
move
back
home!

Who’s
going
to
liB
a
restricHon
first?
+
TODDLERS!
:D
:D
:D

    • Guest
starring:
+
Ferdinand
Penguino
(The
Penguino
Legacy)
+
Indy
VeHnari
(The
VeGnari
Dualegacy)
+
Magellan
Penguino
(The
Penguino
Legacy)
+
Spencer
Fitzhugh
(The
Fitzhugh
Legacy)
…Thanks
to
Pen,
Doc,
and
Marina
for
use
of
their
sims!

Also,
thanks
to
Rose,
De,
and
Pen,
each
of
whom
reviewed
some
part
of
this
chapter
while
it
was
in
the
making.

    • Yes…the
streaker
really
is
dancing
for
the
penguin.
Happy
Simming!