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Apocalypse of Ice Chapter 12 Part 1 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Previously
on
An
Apocalypse
of
Ice:
 We
got
a
li2le
bit
of
insight
into
the
legal
world
of
Winterfell,
where
we
met
Brandon’s
assistant,
the
slightly
wide‐eyed
Natalie
 Horn,
and
one
of
the
thorns
in
his
side,
the
poli@cian
Pius
Piper
(who
has
also
been
spo2ed
spying
on
Arthur
and
Sabriel).

Arthur
 and
Sabriel
prepared
for
the
day
when
they
would
assume
Brandon’s
posi@on
as
The
Law,
beginning
to
draI
a
governing
 instrument
that
they
would
use
to
both
summarize
the
le2er
and
the
spirit
of
Brandon’s
Code.

Will
and
Jan
kept
going
in
their
 paths,
anxious
about
when
they
would
meet
one
another
again.

Finally,
Aliena
came
to
blows
with
the
resurrected
Sansa
when
 Sansa
started
becoming
too
close
to
Ali’s
son,
Kay.

That
ended
when
Sansa
was
thrown
out
of
the
house—but
not
before
 poisoning
Aliena
in
retalia@on.


 [Note:

I
went
a
li2le
bit
crazy
with
default
replacement
clothes,
makeup,
and
hair
in
between
Chapter
11
and
this
chapter.

If
a
 sim
looks
different
(and
by
“a
sim”
I
mean
“Will”),
it’s
because
of
that,
not
because
I’m
flou@ng
the
Show
Business
restric@on.]

  • 2. When
Will
got
home,
no
one
was
in
the
front
part
of
the
house.

He
picked
up
the
newspaper
and
scanned
for
the
job
lis@ng.

 There
it
was:
the
posi@on
in
the
Gamer
track
he
had
been
looking
for.

He
accepted
the
posi@on.

  • 3. With
that
done,
he
began
to
meditate
by
the
kitchen
area
un@l
the
sun
came
up.

  • 4. Julian
came
downstairs
a
few
hours
later
to
find
Will
by
the
dishwasher
and
turned
away.

How
was
Will
already
here?

Julian
had
 thought
he
wasn’t
supposed
to
arrive
for
a
couple
more
days.

Maybe
that
was
just
wishful
thinking.

It
wasn’t
like
Jan
would
look
 him
in
the
eye
anyway,
and
why
would
she?

But
things
weren’t
going
to
get
any
be2er
now
that
Will
was
here.

  • 5. Chris
was
the
next
one
to
come
downstairs.

By
that
@me,
it
was
almost
dawn,
and
Will
had
come
out
of
his
trance
to
get
ready
for
 his
first
day
on
the
job.

“Welcome
home,”
she
said,
kissing
him
on
the
cheek.

“It’s
so
good
to
have
you
back.”

Thank
goodness,
 she
almost
said.

The
family
needed
its
heir
back.

  • 6. “Thanks,”
Will
said.

“It’s
good
to
be
home.”

He
wasn’t
sure
if
it
was.

What
if
it
all
went
wrong?

But
it
was
the
right
thing
to
say,
 even
if
he
wasn’t
sure
if
he
meant
it.

  • 7. Jan
was
the
next
one
to
come
down
the
stairs.
 Konstan5ne
came
walking
down
the
stairs
 Doesn’t
she
look
good
 Standing
in
her
underwear?
 My
Konstan5ne
came
walking
down
the
stairs
 And
all
that
I
could
do
 Was
touch
her
long
blonde
hair

  • 8. It
wasn’t
as
if
Will
had
never
seen
her
in
her
underwear
before.

He’d
seen
her
undressed
a
lot.

But
this
was
the
first
@me
that
he
 had
seen
her
like
this
and
known
that
he
was
supposed
to
marry
her.


 “Hi,”
he
said,
trying
not
to
think
about
how
Jan
would
look
without
that
underwear
on.

“How
are
you?”

  • 9. “I
guess
I’m
all
right,”
she
said.

“I
might
be
up
for
my
promo@on
at
work
today.”
 “That’s
great!”

Will
grinned.

“So,
this
is
it,
then?

Mad
Scien@st?”
 “I
hope
so.”

  • 10. “What
are
you
going
to
invent
once
you
get
it?”

Will
asked.
 Jan
narrowed
her
eyes,
thinking
about
it
but
not
wan@ng
to
at
the
same
@me.

“I’d
rather
not
say,”
she
said.

“I
don’t
know
how
 well
it’s
going
to
be
received.”

  • 11. Not
for
the
first
@me,
Will
wondered
what
in
the
world
he
was
supposed
to
say
to
get
Jan
to
talk
to
him.

“It
can’t
be
that
bad,”
he
 said.

It
came
out
more
sharply
than
he
had
meant.

“I
mean,
you
couldn’t
have
go2en
this
far
if
it
was,
right?”


 “Maybe
you’re
right.”

Jan
smiled.

  • 12. Then
she
went
in
for
a
@ckle.
 “Hey!

No
fair!”

Will
squirmed
away.

  • 13. AIer
Will
leI
for
work,
Jan
sat
down
on
a
couch
with
one
of
her
books.

She
found
herself
smiling
even
as
she
paged
through
the
 trials
she
had
conducted
of
the
effects
of
cheesecake
on
pregnant
women.
 Sooner
or
later,
she
was
going
to
have
to
admit
that
she
liked
Will.

It
didn’t
make
sense,
but
there
was
something
about
being
 around
him
that
made
her
smile.

Maybe
this
@me
could
be
different.

Jan’s
heart
s@ll
felt
so
heavy,
though.

  • 14. But
things
went
on
mostly
as
usual
at
the
house.

Brandon
and
Julian
s@ll
teased
each
other
over
mahjong,
though
their
jibes
had
 grown
more
good‐natured
with
age.



  • 15. Chris
kept
working
on
maxing
her
skills.

Strangely,
she
felt
like
she
was
growing
less
logical
as
she
prac@ced
chess,
not
more.

 There
was
something
just
beyond
her
grasp
that
was
going
to
result
in
a
disaster
for
the
family.

What
was
it?

  • 16. “Hello,
this
is
Chris.”
 “Hey,
Mom.”
 “Sabriel!

How
are
you?”

  • 17. “Oh,
I’m
fine,”
Sabriel
said.

“Is
Will
around?”

  • 18. “He’s
at
work
right
now,”
Chris
said.

“Apparently
he
got
the
job
he
wanted
right
away.

Except
the
job
he
wanted
is
to
sit
around
 and
play
games.

I
don’t
understand.”
 “Really?

He
told
us
that
his
big
plan
was
to
fix
up
the
phones.”

Sabriel
laughed.

“What
do
games
have
to
do
with
that?”
 “There
must
be
some
kind
of
connec@on.”

Chris
shrugged.

Will
would
figure
it
out
eventually.

“Tell
me
what
you’re
up
to
at
 college.”

  • 19. “Oh,
Arthur
and
I
are
just
up
to
the
usual.

Classes.

Exams.

Planning
for
what
we’re
going
to
do
aPer
gradua5on.

Pillow
figh5ng.”

  • 20. “That’s
good.

Are
you
skilling?”
 “Yes,
Mom.

It’s
like
I’m
chained
to
the
damn
chessboard
un5l
I
get
those
last
couple
logic
points.

So’s
Arthur.

Skilling,
I
mean.

I
 think
he
likes
it
more.”

  • 21. Sabriel
yawned
at
the
thought
of
chess.

“Anyway,
I’ve
got
to
go.

Class
is
in
an
hour
and
I
need
my
minions
to
explain
it
to
me.

You
 should
come
over
some@me.”

  • 22. “I
think
we
will,
the
next
@me
we
can
get
out
of
the
house.”

That
was
assuming
that
Brandon
wasn’t
too
sick
to
travel,
but
Chris
 hoped
that
he
would
be
rela@vely
well.

  • 23. “Yes!

I
got
a
bulls‐eye!”

Arthur
cheered.
 “Isn’t
that
great
for
you,”
Sabriel
said.

“I’m
s@ll
in
the
middle
of
working
out
the
Storm’s
End
Defense
here.”

  • 24. “I
think
this
might
be
a
good
5me
for
you
to
step
away
from
the
chess
table.”
 “I
think
you’re
right.”

Sabriel
toppled
the
white
king
for
good
measure.

“It
was
@me
for
me
to
step
away
from
this
thing
an
hour
 ago.”

  • 25. Downstairs,
she
saw
a
dormie
walking
by
and
remembered
that
a
couple
of
weeks
ago,
Arthur
had
told
her
to
make
new
friends.

 Sabriel
had
brushed
off
his
advice
at
the
@me,
saying
that
it
was
too
hard
to
get
in
touch
with
anyone.

Besides,
she
had
both
a
 brother
and
her
economics
minions.

But
Sabriel
was
bored,
and
it
couldn’t
be
so
bad
to
commiserate
with
someone,
could
it?
 So
she
walked
out
of
the
house
and
greeted
the
dormie:

“Hi.

I’m
Sabriel
Stark.”

  • 26. “Meadow
Tsang,”
the
girl
said,
smiling
as
she
shook
Sabriel’s
hand.

“Wait.

You’re
a
Stark?”
 “Yep.

Bringing
law,
order,
and
full
hygiene
bars
to
Winterfell
since…well,
since
my
parents’
@me.”


  • 27. “So
you’re
one
of
Sansa’s…”
Meadow
trailed
off.
 “Great‐grandkids.”
 “There’s
no
way
it’s
been
that
long!

I
remember
her
like
it
was
yesterday.”

Meadow
smiled.
“She
was
amazing.

She
knew
that
 trouble
was
coming,
but
somehow
she
stayed
so
op@mis@c,
all
the
same.

I
wish
I
was
as
strong
as
she
was.”

  • 28. “So
you’re
one
of
Sansa’s…”
Meadow
trailed
off.
 “Great‐grandkids.”
 “There’s
no
way
it’s
been
that
long!

I
remember
her
like
it
was
yesterday.”

Meadow
smiled.
“She
was
amazing.

She
knew
that
 trouble
was
coming,
but
somehow
she
stayed
so
op@mis@c,
all
the
same.

I
wish
I
was
as
strong
as
she
was.”

  • 29. Sabriel
watched
Meadow
gush
about
her
great‐grandmother,
feeling
oddly
detached.

Sansa
Stark,
the
saint.

Would
anyone
ever
 think
of
her
that
way
aIer
she
was
gone?

Then
Sabriel
remembered
that
Sansa
wasn’t
exactly
gone.



  • 30. “You
should
probably
know
that
she’s
come
back.”
 “Really?”

Meadow
asked.

“That’s
great
news!”

  • 31. Meadow
was
so
enthusias@c
that
Sabriel
hated
to
correct
her,
but
it
had
to
be
done.

“No,
it’s
not,”
she
said.

“She’s…not
the
same
 anymore.”
 “What
do
you
mean?”
 “I
haven’t
seen
her
for
myself.

This
is
just
what
the
woman
who
brought
her
back
told
my
mom,”
Sabriel
said.

“But
apparently
 she’s
gone
over
the
edge.

She’ll
do
anything
to
get
back
into
the
house
and
rule
Winterfell
again.”

At
least
there
wasn’t
any
more
 chance
of
her
marrying
her
brother.

  • 32. “There’s…I’m
sorry.

That
can’t
be
possible.”

Meadow
crossed
her
arms.

“That’s
not
the
Sansa
I
know!”
 “She’s
not
even
calling
herself
Sansa
anymore.

She’s
decided
to
go
by
Alayne.”

Sabriel
didn’t
know
why
she
thought
that
 ma2ered.
 “She’s
s@ll
the
same
Sansa
I
know.”

  • 33. “No.

She’s
not!

That’s
what
I’m
trying
to
tell
you!”

Sabriel
threw
her
hands
in
the
air.

 “You
didn’t
know
her
like
I
did.

That
can’t
be
right.

Even
if
it
is,
she’s
probably
just
trying
to—”
 “Marry
her
own
great‐grandson
so
she
could
be
back
with
the
family
again.

That’s
what
she
was
trying
to
do
before
my
parents
 arranged
a
marriage
for
Will!

You’re
not
supposed
to
mess
with
life
and
death,
and
Alayne
is
the
perfect
example
of
why.

If
you’re
 so
blinded
by
loyalty
to
her
that
you
can’t
see
why—”

  • 34. “I’m
not
blinded.”

Meadow
gave
the
lie
to
this
conclusion
by
closing
her
eyes
and
turning
her
face
away
from
Sabriel.

“She
was
 my
friend,
and
there’s
no
way
she’d
do
something
like
that.”

  • 35. Sabriel
was
going
to
answer,
but
she
remembered
that
she
was
supposed
to
be
making
friends.

Maybe
she
could
persuade
 Meadow
if
they
became
friends.

Even
if
she
couldn’t,
it
was
cold
out,
and
she
didn’t
want
to
be
here
anymore.

“Forget
it,”
she
 said.

“You
want
to
come
in
for
lunch?”


  • 36. Arthur
had
made
his
chili.

Usually,
Sabriel
would
grab
a
bowl
right
away,
but
she
had
class
in
an
hour
and
didn’t
have
@me.

So
she
 gave
the
sink
a
quick
cleaning,
then
headed
off
to
class
while
Arthur
and
Meadow
talked.

  • 37. “I
haven’t
seen
her,
either,”
Arthur
said.

“But—Sabriel’s
probably
already
told
you
this,
but
coming
back
from
the
dead
just
isn’t
 right.

She
probably
was
just
as
great
as
you
say
she
was.

She
just
isn’t
that
way
anymore.”

  • 38. “I
don’t
want
to
believe
it,”
Meadow
said
more
quietly
than
she
had
before.
 “Neither
do
we.

But
we’re
going
to
have
to
deal
with
it
eventually.”

  • 39. When
Jan
got
home,
she
wasn’t
smiling.

It
was
because
she
hadn’t
allowed
herself
to
think
about
her
promo@on
for
such
a
long
 @me
that
she
didn’t
even
know
what
to
do
with
herself
now
that
she
had
it.

  • 40. That
uncertainty
evaporated
as
she
saw
Chris
reading
in
the
front
room.

Jan
placed
a
lamp
on
the
wall,
then
turned
to
Chris
and
 waved.

“I
did
it!

Mad
Scien@st!”

  • 41. “Congratula@ons!”

Chris
s@ll
wished
she
could
have
done
it,
but
she
didn’t
feel
bi2er.

“That’s
your
inven@on
for
gehng
light
into
 the
house
when
the
sun’s
s@ll
up?”

  • 42. Jan
nodded.

“I
s@ll
can’t
believe
I
actually
did
it.

It’s
great.”

  • 43. Will
didn’t
get
promoted,
but
he
was
happy
to
congratulate
Jan
on
her
promo@on.

“What
are
you
going
to
do
next?”

he
asked
 her.
 “My
life@me
want
is
to
be
a
Rock
God,”
Jan
said.

“But
I
want
to
see
what
else
I
can
invent
first.

Plus,
the
hours
are
short
and
I
 don’t
have
to
put
in
that
much
face
@me
at
the
lab,
so
it’ll
be
easy
to
hide
pregnancies.”



  • 44. “Sounds
like
a
good
enough
plan
to
me,”
Will
said.

“You’ve
worked
hard
to
get
here,
and—Jan?”

She
had
turned
from
him
and
 closed
her
eyes.

“What’s
wrong?”
 “Nothing.”

Jan
remembered
how
hard
she
had
tried
to
not
get
pregnant.

She
thought
of
what
Julian
had
said
about
her
not
being
 the
marrying
kind.

It
was
too
late
now
to
decide
that
he
was
right
aIer
all.

  • 45. Will
wanted
Jan
to
like
him,
but
he’d
had
enough
of
trying
to
start
a
conversa@on
with
her
and
gehng
nothing.

The
words
spilled
 out
of
his
mouth:

“What
the
hell
do
I
have
to
say
to
get
you
to
talk
to
me?”
 Jan
didn’t
say
anything.

Will
could
have
predicted
that.
 “I
want…”

Will
wanted
everything.

He
kept
his
hands
on
his
hips
because
if
he
didn’t,
he’d
reach
out
to
touch
Jan,
and
she
would
 turn
away
before
his
fingers
even
touched
the
skin
of
her
jawline,
before
he
could
lean
in
and
kiss
her.

“I
don’t
want
you
to
hate
 me.”

  • 46. “I
don’t
hate
you,”
Jan
said.

She
didn’t
know
how
to
feel
about
Will,
but
she
knew
that
much.

“I’m
sorry.

Stop
me
if
you’ve
heard
 this
before,
but
it’s
not
you,
it’s
me.”



  • 47. “Well,
I’m
glad
you
don’t
hate
me,
at
least,”
Will
said.

“I
know
this
situa@on
isn’t
what
either
one
of
us
wanted.

But
I
hope
it’ll
 work,
anyway.”

  • 48. Sabriel
was
supposed
to
be
working
on
the
cons@tu@on,
but
she
decided
to
take
advantage
of
a
computer
game
Jan
had
mailed
to
 her.
 “Hahaha!

I
don’t
care
what
your
highest
score
was,
Will!

I’m
going
to
get
double
your
score
and
then
trample
all
over
you!

This
is
 awesome!”

  • 49. “Sabriel!

Everyone’s
here!”
 “I
just
have
to
finish—”

Sabriel
turned
back
to
the
screen
to
find
that
her
character
had
fallen
off
a
cliff
and
died.

“FINE.

I’ll
be
 there.”

  • 50. The
family
visit
that
Sabriel
had
proposed
had
materialized.

Brandon
couldn’t
make
it,
but
everyone
else
was
there.

  • 51. “Hi
everyone!”

Arthur
said.

“Welcome
to
our
li2le
house.

Those
of
you
who
haven’t
already
seen
it,
of
course.”

  • 52. “Thanks!”

Chris
said.

“I’m
glad
we
could
finally
come
out
to
see
you
here.

I’ve
been
wan@ng
to
see
the
college
for
a
while
now.”
 “And
I
never
thought
I’d
be
glad
to
see
this
place,
but
it’s
nice
to
see
you
again,”
Will
said.
 Oddly,
Julian
stayed
silent.

  • 53. Then,
Arthur
turned
to
greet
Jan.

He
barely
knew
her,
but
he
wanted
to
both
get
to
know
her
be2er
and
prevent
any
poten@al
 family
fisiights
from
breaking
out.

  • 54. As
they
talked,
the
rest
of
the
family
began
to
smustle,
and
the
classmate
Arthur
had
invited
arrived
at
the
door.

  • 55. Sullivan
Livingston
was
a
fellow
drama
major
who
Arthur
had
a
crush
on.

It
looked
like
the
feeling
was
mutual.

  • 56. He
looked
a
li2le
confused
by
the
family’s
decision
to
do
the
smustle
outside,
but
since
it
looked
like
Arthur
was
having
a
good
 @me
leading
everyone
in
the
dance,
Sullivan
joined
in.

  • 57. At
first,
he
thought
Arthur’s
uncle
was
poking
him
in
the
stomach,
since
Arthur
had
warned
him
that
some
of
his
rela@ves
were
a
 li2le
low
on
nice
points.

It
turned
out
that
Julian
was
just
trying
to
do
the
smustle
correctly,
though.

  • 58. Eventually,
though,
everyone
caught
on.

With
everybody
doing
a
reasonably
synchronized
smustle,
bringing
back
par@es
can’t
be
 too
far
behind.

  • 59. Meanwhile,
Sabriel
was
playing
chess
with
Jan.

Playing
against
a
new
opponent
made
the
game
marginally
less
boring,
but
she
 didn’t
like
Jan
for
some
reason
that
she
couldn’t
quite
explain.

This
bothered
Sabriel,
because
usually
she
could
describe
exactly
 why
she
disliked
someone
in
no
uncertain
terms.

  • 60. Jan
didn’t
seem
thrilled
by
the
game,
either.

  • 61. “Your
brother
is
really
hot,”
she
said
almost
to
herself
as
Will
walked
up
the
stairs.
 Sabriel
probably
wasn’t
supposed
to
respond
to
that,
but
she
didn’t
care.

“Whatever.

Life’s
so
much
be2er
without
all
these
 roman@c
dilemmas.

That’s
definitely
one
point
for
not
being
the
heir.”

  • 62. “I’m
really
glad
somebody
thinks
you’re
hot,
Will,”
Sabriel
said
as
Jan
went
downstairs
for
salad.
 “Who?

Jan?”
 “No,
the
dartboard.

Yes,
Jan.”

  • 63. “Huh.”

That
probably
made
him
sound
even
more
stupid,
but
Jan
was
s@ll
within
earshot,
so
Will
didn’t
want
to
say
what
he
was
 thinking:
Could
have
fooled
me.

  • 64. Downstairs,
Arthur
would
be
well‐advised
to
rein
in
the
drama@c
gestures
before
his
salad
winds
up
all
over
the
kitchen.
 “Do
you
think
it’s
overkill
if
I
wave
my
hands
around
like
this
during
the
monologue,
Sullivan?”

  • 65. “I
don’t
think
so,”
Sullivan
said.

“It
is
a
drama@c
scene,
and
a
li2le
hand‐waving
is
in
order.

Plus,
it’s
fun.”

  • 66. “So,
what
do
you
think
of
the
hot
tub?”

Sabriel
asked
Meadow,
who
had
also
come
to
the
party.

 “It’s
great.

AIer
three
genera@ons
of
restric@ons,
it’s
a
relief
to
sit
back
and
relax
there.

You
must
be
there
all
the
@me.”


  • 67. “Not
really.

It’s
more
of
Arthur’s
thing,”
Sabriel
said.

“I—can’t
remember
the
last
@me
I
sat
back
and
relaxed.

Shoo@ng
things
on
 the
computer
is
pre2y
relaxing,
though.

You
don’t
seem
like
a
shoo@ng
kind
of
person—”
 “I’m
not.

But
other
people
like
it,
and
I
see
how
it
could
be
fun.”

  • 68. Meanwhile,
Julian
was
distracted
by
the
bubble
blower.

  • 69. Chris,
Sullivan,
and
Arthur
had
taken
over
the
hot
tub.

  • 70. Downstairs,
if
you
put
two
Romance
Sims
with
fiIeen
playful
points
together,
then
you
get
a
pillow
fight
where
Will
seems
to
be
 aiming
for
Jan’s
bu2.

It’s
the
closest
he’s
go2en
to
feeling
her
up
so
far.

  • 71. “So,
Sabriel
was
congratula@ng
me
on
somebody
thinking
I’m
hot,”
Will
said
as
he
watched
the
feathers
fall.

  • 72. “She
was?”

Jan
asked,
not
paying
a2en@on
to
what
Will
was
actually
saying.

  • 73. “Yeah.

I
think
I
should
congratulate
you,
too.

Somebody
also
thinks
you’re
hot.”

  • 74. Without
any
further
ado,
Will
stepped
forward
and
kissed
Jan.

  • 75. “That
was
all
right,
wasn’t
it?”

Will’s
hand
lingered
on
the
fabric
of
Jan’s
coat.

  • 76. “Yeah.”

Jan
paused
to
think.

“Be2er
than
all
right.”

  • 77. “That
wasn’t
fair!

Stop
that
right
now!”
 “But
everything’s
fair
in
love
and
pillow
figh@ng!”

Will
grinned.
 Chris
sipped
her
coffee
as
she
watched
them.

She
couldn’t
focus
on
skilling
anymore.
 “No
it—wait,
love
and
pillow
figh@ng?

Did
you
really
just
say
that?”

  • 78. It
took
a
while
before
the
double
entendre
dawned
on
Will.

“Yes,
I
just
did,”
he
said,
stepping
closer
to
Jan.
 “Oh,
Will.

You’re
funny.

In
a
good
way.”

  • 79. As
they
leI
the
room,
Chris
set
down
her
cup
and
let
out
the
sob
that
she
had
been
holding
in.

  • 80. If
Will
was
thinking
anything
as
he
touched
Jan,
it
was
that
he
didn’t
know
why
he’d
ever
thought
about
not
marrying
her.

  • 81. So
aIerward,
they
had
a
quick
wedding
to
make
it
official.

  • 82. Then,
Jan
prepared
a
cheesecake.

As
a
theorist,
she
had
conducted
an
experiment
to
determine
how
cheesecake
caused
one
 zygote
to
become
two.

She
wanted
to
get
her
pregnancies
over
with
so
that
they
wouldn’t
disrupt
her
career,
so
using
the
recipe
 on
herself
made
sense.

  • 83. While
Jan
baked,
Chris
came
up
to
Will.

She
had
thought
about
saying
any
number
of
things,
but
the
only
ques@on
she
could
ask
 was,
“Are
you
happy?”

  • 84. “Yeah.”

His
mom
wouldn’t
stop
looking
at
him.

“I
love
her,
Mom.”
 “Good.”

  • 85. AIer
all,
whenever
Jan
was
in
the
room,
Will
couldn’t
stop
looking
at
her.

He
had
trouble
not
thinking
about
her
when
she
was
 out
of
the
room,
too.

  • 86. And
with
Jan,
Will
never
had
to
be
lonely.

  • 87. Julian
might
have
been
out
of
the
house
carrying
on
with
his
job
as
Educa@on
Minister,
but
he
wasn’t
stupid.

He
saw
Will
and
Jan
 talking
at
the
dining
table
and
turned
toward
the
phone,
trying
not
to
feel
so
sad.





  • 88. Could
things
between
Julian
and
Jan
have
been
different
if
he
had
just
accepted
her
insistence
that
what
she
did
to
earn
a
living
 didn’t
ma2er?

  • 89. Brandon
stopped
trying
to
tease
Julian
completely,
so
much
that
Julian
wondered
if
the
figh@ng
spirit
had
gone
out
of
Brandon
 with
his
illness.

  • 90. Chris
also
wondered
if
she
was
star@ng
to
lose
the
figh@ng
spirit.

She
thought
back
to
how
everything
had
started
with
the
fire
 and
mee@ng
Addison
aIerward.

Too
many
people
had
died
or
were
about
to
die.

  • 91. Jan
helped
Will
with
his
logic.
 “Stop
and
think
before
you
move
that
pawn.

You
know
what’s
going
to
happen
when
you
play
against
yourself,
but
that
doesn’t
 work
when
you
have
an
opponent.

What
do
you
think
will
happen
when
you
move
it?

How
is
that
going
to
help
you
five
moves
 from
now?”

  • 92. And
not
long
aIer
that,
she
got
empirical
proof
of
her
pregnancy.

  • 93. “See,
I
told
you
she
thought
you
were
hot,”
Sabriel
said
when
she
found
out.
 Will
didn’t
say
anything.

  • 94. “Yes,
I
am
going
to
congratulate
you.

Congratula@ons.

And
that’s
all
I’m
going
to
say
because
I
s@ll
can’t
stand
the
thought
of
you
 boinking
anybody.”




 “Well,
the
same
goes
for
you.

I
guess
I’m
supposed
to
beat
up
anybody
who
threatens
my
liWle
sister’s
virtue.”

  • 95. “Well,
I’m
glad
you’re
not
going
to
have
that
problem.

No
one’s
going
to
threaten
my
so‐called
virtue,
and
if
they
do,
I
can
do
my
 own
bea@ng
up.

Oh,
plumbob,
I’m
going
to
be
an
aunt.

I’m
too
young
to
be
an
aunt.”

  • 96. “Sihng
around?

Why
aren’t
you
working
out?”
 Was
this
man
going
to
insist
on
disturbing
Arthur’s
hot
tub
@me?

Apparently.

He
opened
his
eyes
a
sliver.

“Because
I
have
ten
 body
points
and
I
don’t
need
to.

Please
stop
yelling
at
me.”

Arthur
closed
his
eyes
again.

  • 97. Later
that
semester,
Sabriel
achieved
her
independence
from
the
chess
table
aIer
she
gained
her
ninth
logic
point.

  • 98. She
celebrated
by
purchasing
a
television.

Unfortunately,
while
the
technology
might
have
been
invented,
there
weren’t
very
 many
things
to
watch.

  • 99. “YOU
SUCK,”
Sabriel
shouted
at
both
Angela
and
Lilith
Pleasant.

She
couldn’t
decide
which
one
she
hated
more.

She
sympathized
 with
Lilith
a
li2le,
but
then
Lilith
turned
around
and
started
sleeping
with
every
guy
in
sight
just
to
get
a2en@on.

  • 100. “Great.

Now
I’m
emo@onally
invested
in
this
crap.”

  • 101. “Arthur,
you
need
your
own
TV
show
when
you
graduate,”
Sabriel
said.

“All
this
dreck
is
really
depressing.”
 “Dreck?

I
haven’t
been
watching,”
Arthur
said.

  • 102. “You
know.

Watching
other
people’s
sibling
drama,
watching
some
guy
who
doesn’t
know
how
to
cook—he
actually
set
himself
 on
fire,
which
was
pre2y
funny
even
though
I
felt
kind
of
ashamed
of
myself
for
laughing—it’s
a
nice
escape
from
studying,
but
I
 feel
like
I’m
losing
skill
points
just
by
watching
it.

You’d
own
all
those
other
shows.”
 Arthur
added
the
face
to
the
snowman
as
Sabriel
talked.

“Sounds
like
that’s
the
place
to
start
for
bringing
a
few
fun
and
games
 into
people’s
lives
again,”
he
said.

“Maybe
I
should
start
watching.”
 “Go
for
it.

I
need
to
be
able
to
talk
to
someone
about
how
ridiculous
the
Pleasants
are
and
lament
why
I
can’t
stop
watching
 them.”

  • 103. To
be
con5nued
in
Part
2…