An Apocalypse of Ice; chapter 10.1

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  • 1. Previously
on
An
Apocalypse
of
Ice:

 Everybody
celebrated!

The
Stark
family
could
finally
eat
as
much
as
they
wanted,
and
Julian
had
finally
opened
up
the
schools
 and
colleges
to
everyone.

There
was
much
rejoicing
and
smustling
involved.
 But
there
was
trouble
on
the
horizon.

Will
wasn’t
quite
as
happy
about
the
opportunity
to
go
to
college
as
he
thought
he
should
 have
been.

He
had
never
liked
school,
but
now
he
liked
it
even
less,
and
he
started
fearing
going
to
class.

Mal
found
out
that
 Julian’s
girlfriend,
Jan
Tellerman,
was
a
Theorist
and
started
thinking
about
arranging
a
marriage
between
Jan
and
Will.

And
 wannabe
Captain
Hero
Ali
Merana
decided
it
would
be
a
good
idea
to
resurrect
Sansa
Stark.

Considering
that
she’s
planning
to
 get
back
to
her
old
family
and
take
over
by
any
means
necessary,
no
maLer
how
extreme,
Ali
appears
to
have
been
wrong
about
 this.

Sansa
is
calling
herself
Alayne
Stone
and
is
probably
going
to
cause
a
lot
of
trouble.

  • 2. Will
hadn’t
known
what
to
expect
when
he
went
to
college,
but
passing
out
in
the
sand
while
considering
himself
lucky
to
have
a
 roof
over
his
head
was
not
on
the
list.

He
hadn’t
even
had
any
alcohol.

  • 3. He
had
brought
a
few
items
with
him,
but
the
money
he
had
was
barely
enough
for
walls
around
him,
a
roof,
and
a
toilet.

 Oldtown
University
might
have
been
something
special
in
Sansa’s
day,
but
right
now
the
administrators
couldn’t
handle
the
rush
 of
students
who
had
come
now
that
it
was
open
again.

Uncle
Julian
was
probably
trying
to
correspond
with
the
professors
and
 deans
to
help
them
out,
but
Winterfell
was
a
long
way
from
Oldtown,
and
it
was
difficult
to
communicate
in
the
best
of
Qmes.

  • 4. He
declared
the
math
major,
because
math
had
been
one
of
the
few
things
that
Will
liked
in
high
school.

Math
problems
usually
 had
answers,
even
though
he
didn’t
always
know
how
to
find
them.

Will
preferred
that
to
trying
to
scour
old
books
for
answers
 that
didn’t
seem
to
exist
and
that
he
wouldn’t
recognize
even
if
they
did
exist.

  • 5. But
college
was
harder
than
he
had
ever
thought
it
would
be,
especially
because
he
could
afford
so
liLle.

Will’s
life
had
narrowed
 down
to
studying,
eaQng,
and
trying
to
get
some
sleep
in
the
recliner
he
had
purchased.

He
wondered
if
it
had
been
like
this
for
 his
ancestors
when
they
had
first
returned
to
Winterfell.

  • 6. But
there
were
strange
phone
calls
that
livened
up
his
day.
 “Who
are
you?”
 “Aliena
Merana—”
 “Who’s
that?

And
how
did
you
get
my
number?”
 “That’s
not
important.

You
might
be
in
danger.

Sansa
Stark
has
come
back—”


  • 7. “Wait.

Are
you
for
real?”

Will
asked.
 “Yes!

I
saw
her
come
back
from
the
dead!”
 “No,
you
didn’t.

People
don’t
come
back
from
the
dead.

THAT’S
WHY
THEY’RE
DEAD.”

  • 8. He
talked
for
a
liLle
while
longer,
just
because
it
was
interesQng
to
talk
somebody,
no
maLer
how
crazy.

Then
he
decided
it
was
 Qme
for
a
nap.

  • 9. “What
am
I
supposed
to
do
to
get
him
to
believe
me?”

Aliena
asked
herself
while
sing
at
the
chess
board.

She
understood
 Will’s
insistence
that
dead
was
dead.

That
was
what
she
had
always
thought
unQl
she
had
received
the
telephone.

But
that
 wasn’t
true
anymore,
and
if
she
was
going
to
be
a
hero
instead
of
the
bad
guy,
then
she
would
have
to
get
the
Stark
family
to
 believe
her
before
any
of
them
had
a
run‐in
with
Alayne
Stone.

  • 10. She
tried
to
warn
anyone
she
saw
come
by
the
house
when
Alayne
was
out
of
earshot,
but
it
looked
like
her
warnings
were
going
 over
everyone’s
heads.
 “I
wish
it
wasn’t
true,”
Ali
told
Chris
Stark
as
she
finished
telling
the
story.

“But
I
know
it
is.

I
saw
her
come
back.

And
she’s
 obsessed
with
your
family.

If
I
don’t
find
a
way
to
stop
her,
then
I
don’t
know
what
she’ll
do
to
you
in
order
to
take
control
of
 Winterfell
for
herself.”

  • 11. Unlike
Will,
Chris
gave
the
tale
some
consideraQon.
 I’ve
seen
almost
all
of
the
other
ghosts,
she
thought.

Eowyn
sure
does
like
to
scare
me.

But
never
Sansa.

Julian’s
the
only
one
 who’s
seen
her
haun?ng.

And
if
they
can
come
back
from
beyond
the
grave
this
way…why
not
another
way?

  • 12. Chris
at
least
seemed
to
be
thinking
about
it.
 “I
wish
I
knew
whether
I
could
believe
you
or
not,”
she
said.

“There’s
no
way
to
know.

Sansa’s
been
dead
for
long
enough
that
 most
people
who
knew
her
are
probably
gone,
too.

But
it’s
possible.

And
if
anyone
like
that
comes
near
our
family…”
What
 would
they
do?

“We’ll
protect
ourselves.”

  • 13. But
things
in
Aliena’s
house
were
a
liLle
bit
normal.

Alayne
had
taken
a
job
as
a
test
subject.

Even
though
Ali
was
wary
of
leng
 Alayne
out
of
the
house,
they
had
to
earn
money,
and
it
was
beLer
for
Alayne
to
have
a
job
than
to
leave
her
alone
at
the
house.

 Who
knew
what
pies
she
might
get
her
fingers
in
there?

At
least
if
she
had
a
job,
other
people
would
sQll
be
keeping
an
eye
on
 her.
 For
her
part,
Alayne
rose
in
her
career
quickly.

A`er
all,
she
had
been
a
renowned
ecological
guru
before,
and
she
sQll
 remembered
a
few
things.

If
she
kept
on
geng
promoted,
she
reasoned,
maybe
she
would
come
to
her
family’s
noQce,
and
they
 would
realize
what
she
could
do
for
them.





  • 14. And
Aliena
was
in
love.

She
wasn’t
sure
exactly
how
she
had
met
Jocelyn
Morgan,
but
she
knew
that
they
had
been
lucky
to
find
 each
other.

There
was
just
something
about
Jocelyn
that
completely
enchanted
Ali.

Half
the
Qme,
it
looked
like
she
was
dreaming
 of
a
place
where
life
was
ten
Qmes
beLer
than
it
was
here.

The
other
half
of
the
Qme,
it
looked
like
she
was
trying
to
find
a
way
to
 bring
that
perfect
world
in
her
head
to
life.

  • 15. “I
don’t
know
how
to
do
it,”
Jocelyn
told
Ali
over
chess
a`er
Ali
asked
her
about
the
perfect
world
in
her
mind.

It
sounded
like
she
 was
talking
to
someone
far
off
in
the
distance,
but
Jocelyn
sounded
like
that
when
she
spoke
to
everyone.

“There’s
so
much
 wrong
with
this
place.

People
are
so
cruel,
and
when
you
find
someone
you
like,
she
slips
away
from
you
all
too
o`en.”
 “And
the
constant
snow.”
 Jocelyn
blinked
a
few
Qmes.

“No,”
she
said.

“The
snow
is
beauQful.

I
don’t
want
to
see
a
world
without
it.”

  • 16. She
had
even
told
Jocelyn
about
the
debacle
with
Sansa
Stark,
and
she
just
thought
it
was
sweet
that
she
was
willing
to
go
so
far
 to
make
a
beLer
world.

How
could
Ali
be
lucky
enough
that
someone
like
Jocelyn
would
be
interested
in
her
a`er
all
the
mistakes
 she
had
made?

  • 17. So
once
Ali
told
Jocelyn
that
she
loved
her,
they
got
married
right
away.

If
Ali
let
her
slip
away,
who
knew
if
they
would
ever
find
 each
other
again,
when
it
was
so
difficult
to
stay
in
contact
with
anyone
out
here?

She
had
to
take
this
chance
while
she
could,
 before
Jocelyn
came
to
her
senses
and
found
someone
else
who
was
actually
good
enough
for
her.

  • 18. Of
course,
things
weren’t
going
to
be
normal
around
here
as
long
as
Aliena
had
a
formerly
dead
person
in
the
house
making
 extreme
plans,
but
at
least
it
felt
like
now
she
could
start
to
live
her
life
again.



  • 19. “The
kids
are
growing
up
so
quickly,”
Mal
observed
as
Chris
beat
him
at
mahjong.

“Will’s
off
to
college,
and
now
Sabriel’s
about
to
 become
a
teenager
and
choose
her
aspiraQon.

Wasn’t
it
just
yesterday
when
they
were
small
enough
to
pick
up?”

  • 20. “I
know.

I
was
just
helping
Sabriel
with
a
speech
she
has
to
give
for
school
today,
and
I
was
thinking
about
how
she’s
not
going
to
 be
so
liFle
anymore.”

 “They
have
to
give
speeches
for
school
now?

Back
in
my
day,
it
was
just
reading
and
math
problems.”
 “Julian
thought
it
was
a
good
idea
to
help
kids
with
their
charisma.”
 “It
is.

I
should
tell
him
that
some?me,
if
he’ll
talk
to
me.”

  • 21. “Why
wouldn’t
he
talk
to
you?”
 “He—”
Mal
started.

“We
need
to
have
a
family
meeQng.

Jan’s
a
theorist,
and
she
could
really
help
the
family.

But
to
do
that—”


 “I
see,”
Chris
said.

She
couldn’t
help
think
that
this
could
have
been
avoided
if
she
had
achieved
her
lifeQme
want,
and
she
didn’t
 want
to
think
about
resolving
the
conflict,
so
she
changed
the
subject.

“What
aspiraQon
do
you
think
Sabriel
will
choose?”
 “I
was
hoping
one
of
the
kids
would
pick
Fortune,”
Mal
said.

“I
know
we
don’t
have
to
work
as
hard
to
get
by
as
we
used
to,
but
 our
family
has
always
valued
hard
work.”

  • 22. “Will
and
Arthur
had
to
choose
what
was
right
for
them,
though.

They
wouldn’t
have
been
happy
if
they’d
picked
their
aspiraQons
 to
please
us.”
 “I
know.

I’m
just
hoping
the
kids
are
going
to
be
as
dedicated
to
making
things
beLer
around
here
as
we
were.”

  • 23. “Well,
we
had
a
lot
to
do,”
Chris
pointed
out.

“Laws,
showers,
food,
and
college
were
not
small
potatoes.

They
won’t
have
to
do
 as
much
as
we
did,
but
as
long
as
they
stay
commiLed
to
the
work,
everything
should
be
fine.”

  • 24. “I
know.

I
just
hope—you
won
again?”
 “Yep.”

Chris
smiled.
 “How
do
you
keep
winning
this
game
without
cheaQng?”

  • 25. As
usual,
not
enough
people
were
paying
aLenQon
to
Sabriel
as
she
grew
up
a
few
hours
later.

  • 26. But,
unfortunately,
she
couldn’t
stop
herself
from
growing
up
unQl
her
dad
and
her
uncle
tore
themselves
away
from
the
mahjong
 table,
so
she
grew
up
in
the
corner.
 At
least
I
have
decent
clothes,
Sabriel
thought.

But
what
do
I
want?

  • 27. It
didn’t
take
very
much
thought.

Sabriel
wanted
to
break
out
of
the
house
and
go
on
adventures.

But
her
adventures
were
going
 to
be
beLer
than
every
single
one
her
dad
and
great‐grandfather
had
ever
been
on.

There
was
sQll
so
much
of
the
world
yet
to
 discover,
and
she
was
going
to
do
it.

  • 28. Mal
hoped
that
everyone
would
play
nice
and
come
to
the
consensus
that
would
be
best
for
the
family.

But
as
he
waited
for
 Julian
with
Brandon
and
Chris,
he
had
a
feeling
that
their
discussion
of
marrying
Jan
into
the
family
would
be
anything
but
nice.

 Julian
had
said
that
he
should
have
known
Mal
was
going
to
do
this
to
him.

It
wasn’t
as
if
Mal
wanted
to
hurt
Julian,
but
how
 could
the
family
pass
up
this
chance?



  • 29. “Am
I
insane
for
even
thinking
this
is
a
good
idea?”
he
asked
Chris.
 “Not
as
insane
as
you
might
think,”
she
answered.

“It’s
far
from
ideal,
but
there’s
so
much
that
Jan
could
do
with
our
help.

Not
 just
for
us,
but
also
for
everyone
in
the
community.

This
marriage
is
at
least
worth
considering.”

  • 30. “Considering?”

Julian
asked,
taking
his
seat.

“You’ve
already
decided
to
go
forward
with
it,
haven’t
you?

Do
I
even
have
to
be
 here
for
this?”
 “Yes,
Julian,”
Mal
said.

“We
haven’t
made
any
decisions
yet.

We
just
think
it’s
worth
thinking
about.”

  • 31. “It’s
disgusQng,
that’s
what
it
is.

Think
about
it.

You’re
trying
to
set
Will
up
with
his
uncle’s
girlfriend.

Isn’t
that
incest?”
 “No,”
Brandon
said.

“Will
and
Jan
aren’t
related
by
blood.”
 “Well,
it
should
be.”

  • 32. Halfway
down
the
stairs
to
the
second
floor,
Sabriel
heard
her
parents
and
uncles
talking.

She
stopped
at
the
landing
to
listen.

 Was
it
true?

Could
she
be
the
heir?

She
had
dreamed
that
everyone
would
realize
she
was
best
for
the
job,
but
she
had
never
 thought
it
could
be
real.

  • 33. “This
could
be
one
of
the
best
things
that
ever
happened
to
the
family,
though,”
Mal
suggested.
 “The
only
way
that
this
is
the
best
thing
for
the
family
is
if
I’m
not
part
of
the
special
liLle
‘family’
of
Fortune
Sims
that
you’re
 talking
about.

Or
if
I’m
not
significant
enough
to
be
in
your
family—“
 “You
are
important
to
us,
Julian.”

  • 34. “You’re
sure
not
acQng
like
it,
Mal.

And
what
about
Will?

I’m
not
leng
you
do
this
to
him,
either.

You
always
talked
about
being
 a
beLer
parent
than
Mom
and
Dad,
and
you
walked
the
walk
for
a
while,
but
it
looks
like
in
the
end
you’re
going
to
make
just
as
 big
of
a
mistake
as
them,
if
not
bigger.”
 Mal
opened
and
closed
his
mouth,
not
knowing
how
to
respond
to
that.

  • 35. “That’s
enough,
Julian.”

Chris
cut
him
off.

“Will
can
decide
what
he
wants
for
himself.

If
he
decides
that
this
is
too
weird
for
him,
 that’s
his
choice.

But
this
marriage
has
advantages.”
 “Name
one
of
them.”
 “Fine.

She’s
already
almost
at
the
top
of
her
career,
and
she
does
something
that
we
were
desperately
hoping
to
get
done
during
 our
Qme
leading
the
family.

Remember
when
Brandon
and
Mal
decided
that
one
of
them
would
be
a
mad
scienQst
and
the
other
 one
would
be
a
celebrity
chef?

Well,
none
of
us
ever
became
mad
scienQsts,
because
there
were
never
any
ways
to
break
into
the
 field.

Jan
is
in
the
field,
and
she’s
good
at
what
she
does.”

  • 36. “That’s
true,”
Mal
said,
glad
that
somebody
was
supporQng
him
now.

“And
then
there
are
the
things
we’d
be
able
to
do.

Not
just
 else,
but
everyone
else
who
lives
in
this
community.

Lights.

Electronics.

And
we’d
be
able
to
move
out.”
 “Good.

So
I
could
die
alone
in
some
house
somewhere
and
not
have
to
watch
the
two
of
them
pawing
at
each
other,”
Julian
said.
 “Do
you
have
anything
producQve
to
say?”

Brandon
snapped
from
the
other
end
of
the
table.



  • 37. “Of
course
it’s
hard
to
find
a
job
and
get
promoted.

I
know
that,
maybe
beLer
than
any
of
you,”
Julian
said.

“But
it’s
what
we’ve
 always
done.

There’s
no
reason
why
you
can’t
let
Will
marry
someone
he
loves
and
let
that
person
top
the
career.”

  • 38. “Hey,
I’ve
got
a
brilliant
idea,”
Brandon
said.

“Is
there
anybody
else
who
could
invent
all
these
amazing
contrapQons
we’re
 thinking
about?

Then
we
can
arrange
a
marriage
between
Will
and
that
person
and
avoid
all
of
this.”
 “Well,
my
friend
Benjamin
Long
is
a
mad
scienQst,”
Chris
said.

“If
Sabriel
was
the
heir,
she
could
marry
him,
and
we
could
avoid
all
 this
weirdness.”

  • 39. “But
that’s
not
how
it
works,”
Brandon
said.

“The
firstborn
son
inherits.

I
know
that
I
didn’t
want
to
be
the
heir,
but
I
had
the
 opQon
to
decide
whether
I
wanted
it
or
not.

We
can’t
just
disinherit
Will
while
we’re
sing
around
this
table.”

  • 40. Sabriel
headed
for
the
chess
board
to
pracQce.

She
had
heard
enough.

  • 41. “So
you’re
saying
we
should
just
go
to
Will
and
ask
him
if
this
is
what
he
wants?”

Mal
asked.
 “Yes,”
Brandon
said.

“He’s
almost
grown
up,
and
he
can
make
the
decision
if
he
really
wants
to
be
heir
or
step
aside
in
Sabriel’s
 favor.

It’s
not
ideal,
but
it
will
help
us.”
 “Fine,”
Julian
said.

It
didn’t
look
like
anyone
was
going
to
budge,
and
he
was
as
Qred
of
sing
around
the
table
as
the
rest
of
 them.

Besides,
Will
would
never
agree
to
this.



  • 42. “I
never
meant
it
to
go
this
way,”
Mal
said
to
Julian.

“I’m
sorry.”

  • 43. “Of
course
you
didn’t
want
this.”

Julian
didn’t
think
that
Mal
was
out
to
get
him,
but
a`er
listening
to
the
other
people
around
 the
table
talk
about
his
relaQonship
as
if
it
meant
nothing,
it
definitely
didn’t
feel
like
he
was
part
of
this
family.

  • 44. This
Qme,
Sabriel
wasn’t
scowling
at
the
board
just
because
she
hated
chess.
She
hurt,
and
she
didn't
want
to
show
it,
even
 though
nobody
was
around.
"It
doesn’t
maLer,"
she
told
the
white
knight
across
the
board
as
she
moved
it
forward
two
spaces
 and
one
space
to
the
right.
StarQng
by
advancing
the
king's
pawn
forward
two
spaces
was
geng
boring.

  • 45. "Hey,
Sable!"
Arthur
said,
sing
down
at
the
board
across
from
her.
"What's
up?”
 "Nothing."
She
advanced
her
queen's
pawn.
 “But
you
said
‘It
doesn’t
maLer.’”
 “Nothing
you’d
understand.”
Sabriel
stressed
the
last
word
so
that
Arthur
would
back
off.
 “Okay.
Whatever.”


  • 46. Of
course
Arthur
had
backed
off.
He
always
did
every
Qme
she
challenged
him.
That
just
made
this
whole
situaQon
ten
Qmes
 worse.
He
would
just
want
to
play
a
peaceful
game
of
chess,
even
though
he
hated
chess
almost
as
much
as
her,
and
that
was
the
 last
thing
she
wanted
to
do.
Sabriel
wanted
a
fight.

 “Why
can’t
girls
inherit
Winterfell?”
she
asked.
 “What
are
you
talking
about?
Of
course
they
can.”
 “Only
when
there
aren’t
any
boys
around.
Grandma
was
an
only
child,
and
our
great‐grandma
would
have
been
some
powerless
 queen
somewhere
if
her
brothers
hadn’t
been
murdered.
But
you’d
never
think
of
that,
would
you?”

  • 47. Arthur
moved
a
piece.
“Do
you
want
to
be
the
heir?
I
bet
if
you
told
Dad,
he’d
let
you.”
 “That’s
not
the
point.”
 “What
is?”

  • 48. “He
shouldn’t
have
to
let
me,”
Sabriel
snapped
back.

“Uncle
Brandon
said
when
he
gave
it
to
Dad
that
it
should
go
to
the
person
 who’d
be
the
best
at
it,
but
apparently
he
didn’t
really
mean
it,
he
was
only
saying
it
because
he
only
had
brothers—“
 “Wait.

What
are
you
talking
about?”
 “I
overheard
our
parents
and
uncles
talking
about
who
they
were
going
to
marry
Will
to.

It’s
really
sick
and
twisted—you
don’t
 want
to
know.

And
Mom
said
that
one
of
her
friends
was
a
Mad
ScienQst,
and
that
I
could
marry
him
and
it
wouldn’t
be
so
sick
 and
twisted.

But
Uncle
Brandon
said
something
about
how
it
should
go
to
Will
first,
because
he
was
the
firstborn
son
and
 Winterfell
was
his
to
accept
or
turn
down—“

  • 49. “Well,
that
doesn’t
mean—“
 “Would
you
stop
interrupQng
me?”

Arthur
looked
away
from
her.

Good.

“God,
someQmes
I
wish
I’d
had
a
few
more
sisters
and
 aunts
and
a
few
less
brothers
and
uncles.

They’d
understand.”
 “I’m
trying
to
understand,
Sabriel.”

  • 50. “You
don’t
even
want
to
be
the
heir,”

Okay,
maybe
that
wasn’t
true,
but
that
wasn’t
the
point.

“You’d
rather
just
sit
around
in
 your
pajamas,
go
to
parQes,
and
play
mahjong
all
the
live
long
day
a`er
you
do
what
you
have
to
do
for
the
family.”




 “I’ve
never
thought
about
whether
I
want
to
be
heir.”
 “Because
you
can’t
be
the
heir.”

And
they’d
s?ll
consider
you
over
me,
even
though
it’d
be
just
as
sick
and
twisted
if
you
married
 Jan,
and
you’d
like
it
even
less
than
Will
would.

Even
though
you
shouldn’t
be
the
heir
if
you
won’t
just
fight
back.
 “Well,
I’ll
ask
you
again—do
you
want
to?”

  • 51. This
conversaQon
was
starQng
all
over
again,
but
with
one
important
difference:
Sabriel
had
poured
her
heart
out
to
Arthur,
and
 he
sQll
didn’t
get
it.

“I’ll
tell
you
again.”

She
got
up
from
the
chair.

“That’s
not
the
point.”

  • 52. Will
had
a
bed
and
a
sink.

This
was
an
improvement.

But
having
a
couple
more
basic
ameniQes
while
Will
studied
unQl
he
 dropped
didn’t
hurt.

  • 53. Sure,
the
assignments
sQll
felt
like
they’d
never
end.

Apparently,
Will
was
supposed
to
have
learned
something
called
calculus
in
 school.

He
wasn’t
sure
how
he
was
supposed
to
do
that,
seeing
as
there
hadn’t
been
any
schools
unQl
a
couple
of
days
before
he
 was
due
to
become
an
adult,
but
all
his
professors
assumed
that
he
knew
how
to
calculate
something
called
a
derivaQve.

He
 didn’t.

 It
also
would
have
helped
if
he
could
read
the
words
and
numbers
wriLen
on
the
pages
that
were
supposed
to
explain
the
 problems
to
him.

Will
had
trouble
focusing,
and
when
he
put
his
assignment
book
away
to
take
a
look
at
it
later,
he
noQced
that
 his
eyes
hurt.

Why
was
that
happening
to
him
when
he
needed
to
focus
as
much
as
possible?

  • 54. Aliena
hadn’t
stopped
calling
to
dangle
her
conspiracy
theories
in
front
of
him,
and
Will
had
started
to
get
to
know
her
beLer.

She
 didn’t
really
act
like
he
expected
a
crazy
person
to
act.

Aliena
just
seemed
like
a
normal
person
who
wanted
a
beLer
life
for
 herself.

She
didn’t
rant
or
rave
about
anything
but
the
supposed
return
of
Sansa
Stark,
going
by
Alayne
Stone.

Could
she
be
right?



  • 55. “Nah.

Can’t
be.”

  • 56. Will
decided
to
freestyle
for
Qps
when
he
got
back
from
class
and
couldn’t
even
think
about
derivaQves
for
another
minute:
 They
got
the
situa?on,
they
got
me
facing
 I
can’t
live
a
normal
life,
I
was
raised
by
the
stripes
 So
I
goFa
be
down
with
the
hood
team
 Too
much
television
watching
got
me
chasing
dreams…
 Tell
me
why
are
we
so
blind
to
see
 That
the
ones
we
hurt
are
you
and
me

  • 57. He
didn’t
get
any
Qps,
but
he
did
get
to
meet
a
girl
named
Celeste.

Will
would
have
liked
to
meet
more
girls,
but
being
stuck
in
his
 dorm
unable
to
call
anyone
and
having
to
teach
himself
calculus
really
did
a
number
on
one’s
ability
to
meet
people.


 “It
is
so
cold
out
here,”
Will
complained.

“I
know
I’m
supposed
to
be
used
to
it,
but
I
don’t
think
I
ever
will
be.”



  • 58. “I
don’t
think
I
will
be,
either,”
Celeste
said.

“And
that’s
good.

It’ll
kill
you
if
you
let
it.”
 They
talked
for
a
liLle
while
longer
before
Celeste
had
to
go
to
class
and
Will
went
inside
for
an
instant
drink.

  • 59. Somewhere
along
the
line,
what
Will
wanted
out
of
life
had
changed.

The
thought
of
being
a
celebrity
chef
like
his
mom
didn’t
 seem
as
appealing
anymore.

That
would
just
mean
more
studying
a`er
he
had
done
something
important
for
the
family.

Will
 wanted
something
that
didn’t
mean
as
much
work,
and
he
wanted
to
have
a
liLle
fun
and
companionship
instead
of
constantly
 going
from
bed
to
refrigerator
to
the
patch
of
floor
with
his
assignments.

That
was
why
he
wanted
to
meet
girls
at
college.

But
 with
the
phone
lines
down
so
o`en,
it
was
next
to
impossible
to
stay
in
contact
with
anyone.

  • 60. Will
wasn’t
sleeping
as
well
as
he
used
to.

He
had
nightmares
where
he
never
saw
his
family
again
and
was
trapped
in
this
small
 house
without
wallpaper
or
floors
for
the
rest
of
his
life.
 I
should
work
on
my
assignment,
he
thought.

But
finishing
those
last
twenty
math
problems
didn’t
appeal
to
Will
at
all.

  • 61. Five
more
minutes,
he
told
himself.

Five
more
minutes
and
then
I’ll
get
to
work.

  • 62. “Well,
snowman?”
he
asked.

“It’s
got
to
get
beLer,
right?”

  • 63. “Hey,
Sabriel,
about
earlier
today—”
 “Just
a
second.

I’m
looking
for
a
job.”
 “How
hard
do
you
have
to
look?”

Arthur
asked.

“There’s
nothing
in
the
paper.

And
why
do
you
want
a
job?

Isn’t
school
and
 skilling
enough?”


  • 64. “Hmmm.

Volunteering
in
a
poliQcal
campaign,”
Sabriel
told
the
paper.

“Sounds
like
that’s
right
up
my
alley.

And
it’s
not
enough
 for
me,”
she
said,
lowering
the
paper
to
look
at
Arthur
and
trying
not
to
sound
angry.

“I
want
to
get
out
of
the
house.

Dad
 worked
at
an
embassy
before
he
started
geng
serious
about
adventuring,
and
I
want
to
try
that.

Plus,
it’s
not
too
early
for
me
to
 start
on
my
resume.”
 “What’s
a
resume?”

 “Are
you
serious?”
 “Yes,
Sabriel.

I
really
am
asking
you
what
a
resume
is.”

  • 65. “Am
I
wrong,
or
are
you
more
focused
on
Ricky
Cormier
than
your
prepara?ons
for
going
to
Oldtown?”

 “…”
 “I
guess
I’m
not
wrong,
then.”

  • 66. “Sabriel,
it’s…”

Arthur
took
a
bite
of
his
grilled
cheese
sandwich
and
watched
his
sister
focus
on
the
paper.

“How
did
you
know?”
 “How
did
I
know?

You
spend
more
Qme
staring
at
him
in
history
class
than
you
do
taking
notes.”
 “Yeah,
but…I’m
not
supposed
to
think
about
guys
that
way,
am
I?”
 “Who
says?”

Sabriel
shrugged.

“I
don’t
think
about
anybody
that
way.”

  • 67. “Come
on.

Let’s
work
on
our
body
points
together
so
that
Dad
will
actually
let
me
go
to
this
job.

I
don’t
really
think
I’d
be
 aFacked,
but
he’s
weird
about
stuff
like
that.”

  • 68. As
expected,
Sabriel
gained
her
body
points.

“See,
Dad?”
she
muLered
as
she
walked
down
the
steps.

“I’ll
show
you.

I’ll
show
all
 of
you.”

  • 69. “How
does
she
do
it?

I’m
already
bored
out
of
my
mind,”
Arthur
complained
a`er
another
long
day
at
school.

He
had
a
gazillion
 assignments
for
his
college
prep
classes,
and
he
also
had
to
keep
building
up
his
skills.

Having
a
good
Qme
didn’t
seem
to
be
on
 anyone’s
agenda
but
his
own.

  • 70. Sabriel
didn’t
know
the
answer
to
that
quesQon,
either.

She
had
spent
three
hours
shuffling
paper
around
and
trying
to
get
phone
 lines
out
to
talk
to
prospecQve
donors,
and
it
was
even
more
boring
than
chess.

But
she
had
to
do
it.

She
had
to
do
something
if
 she
was
going
to
stay
sane.

  • 71. “Nothing
to
do,
people
who
don’t
believe
me
when
I
say
the
phone
lines
are
down,
and
I’m
working
for
a
crook,”
she
ranted.

“And
 I’m
coming
back
here
to
people
who
don’t
respect
me
and
don’t
think
I
have
anything
to
contribute
to
the
family?

I
don’t
think
 so!”

Sabriel
clenched
her
fists.

She
didn’t
care
if
anyone
heard
her.

In
fact,
part
of
her
wanted
them
to
hear
so
they’d
rethink
 making
Will
the
heir.

  • 72. She
had
thought
geng
a
job
and
geng
out
of
the
house
would
make
things
beLer.

It
wasn’t.



  • 73. Mal
had
considerably
more
job
saQsfacQon,
having
just
received
his
final
promoQon.

He
returned
from
his
latest
mission
feeling
 like
he
was
on
top
of
the
world.

  • 74. When
Will
received
a
phone
call
from
Spencer
at
the
end
of
his
second
year
of
college
asking
if
he’d
like
to
come
visit,
Will
 gratefully
accepted
as
soon
as
the
semester
ended
and
he
could
get
transportaQon
from
Oldtown.

There
were
a
few
weeks
 before
classes
began,
and
he
was
not
going
to
spend
those
weeks
in
his
four‐wall
shack
if
he
could
help
it.

Unfortunately,
he
was
 having
the
usual
trouble
with
the
phones,
so
he
hadn’t
been
able
to
get
everything
in
order
to
arrange
a
visit
to
his
family.
 “Hey,
Will!”
Spencer
greeted
him.

His
cheerfulness
was
a
liLle
disorienQng.

“How’s
college
treaQng
you?”

  • 75. A`er
hours
of
transportaQon,
Will
was
in
no
mood
to
mince
words.

“Badly,”
he
said.

“I
don’t
know
why
everyone
else
in
the
 family
wanted
to
go
so
much.

If
they
were
there,
they
would
have
hated
it,
too.”

  • 76. “I’m
sorry
to
hear
that,”
Spencer
said.

“Is
it
anything
that
being
back
here
can
help?”

  • 77. “Not
really,”
Will
sighed.

“Class
sucks.

Maybe
it
wouldn’t
suck
so
much
if
it
didn’t
consume
my
enQre
life.

That
and
trying
to
have
 a
good
night’s
sleep
and
make
my
eyes
stop
hurQng.

And
it’s
nice
that
you’ve
invited
me
over
and
that
you’re
willing
to
listen
to
 me
complain,
but
things
are
going
to
be
just
as
bad
when
classes
start
again.”
 “Well,
I
know
that
if
you
don’t
talk
to
someone,
it’ll
only
get
worse,
and
it
doesn’t
sound
like
you
have
very
many
people
to
talk
to
 out
there,”
Spencer
told
Will.

“Maybe
your
eyes
hurQng
is
something
to
tell
your
dad
about,
though.”

  • 78. “Yeah.”

Will
doubted
whether
his
dad
would
be
able
to
help,
famous
doctor
or
not.

  • 79. “Well…why
don’t
you
come
in
and
relax
for
a
while
before
you
have
to
go
back
to
Oldtown?”

Spencer
suggested.

“Standing
out
 here
in
the
cold
isn’t
going
to
do
you
any
good.

Play
some
darts.

Have
something
to
eat.

Do
something
that
isn’t
about
school
for
 a
liLle
while.”
 “Sounds
good
to
me,”
Will
said.

  • 80. He
stared
at
the
bulls‐eye
and
grasped
the
dart.

No
trouble
seeing
this.

  • 81. While
walking
around
the
neighborhood,
Sabriel
thought
she
saw
Will
through
one
of
the
windows
of
the
house.

Could
it
really
 be
him?

Without
even
thinking
about
what
the
consequences
might
be
(this
was
an
adventure,
a`er
all),
Sabriel
knocked
on
the
 door,
where
she
promptly
met
Spencer
Fitzhugh
and
discovered
that
Will
was
actually
there.

  • 82. “Sabriel!

It’s
great
to
see
you!

You
got
tall!”

Will
said
as
his
sister
joined
him
at
the
darts
game.
 “I
did!

It’s
a
good
thing.

People
don’t
try
to
pat
me
on
the
head
anymore,”
Sabriel
said.

“It’s
great
to
see
you,
too.

Where
have
 you
been?”
 “At
college.”
 “No,
I
mean,
why
haven’t
you
called?”

  • 83. “Same
reason
why
nobody
calls.

I
can’t,”
Will
explained.

“All
I
get
when
I
pick
up
the
phone
is
‘This
number
cannot
be
reached
at
 this
Qme.

Please
try
again
later.’”

 “Well,
that’s
dumb.”
 Will
didn’t
know
why
this
irritated
him
so
much.

Of
course
it
was
dumb.

But
it
was
just
the
way
things
were,
and
he
couldn’t
do
 anything
about
it
now.

  • 84. “Weren’t
you
going
to
come
home
if
you
were
here?”

Sabriel
asked.


 “Sable,
I’ve
got
to
head
back
to
Oldtown,”
Will
explained.

“I’m
studying
all
the
Qme.

Literally.

All
the
Qme.”

 “That’s
stupid.”

Somehow,
Will
being
in
this
house
made
Sabriel
too
angry
to
think.

“You
think
Spencer
is
important
enough
to
 visit,
but
not
your
own
family?”

  • 85. “He
called
me
and
asked
me
to
come
over,”
Will
said.

“You
haven’t.

What
was
I
supposed
to
do?”
 “You’re
supposed
to
care,”
Sabriel
said,
holding
the
darts
in
her
hand
and
focusing
on
the
board.

She
didn’t
want
to
look
at
Will.

 “You’re
supposed
to
at
least
try.”
 “I
am
trying.

I’m
trying
harder
than
I’ve
ever
tried
in
my
life,
just
to
get
by.

College
is
hard,
Sabriel.

It’s
not
some
magic
kingdom
 in
the
sky
like
Dad
says.”

  • 86. “Huh.”

Sabriel
went
to
retrieve
her
darts
and
pointed
at
Will.

“You
know…”
 When
had
his
liLle
sister
started
being
such
a
control
freak?

What
had
he
done
to
offend
her,
other
than
not
calling,
which
wasn’t
 an
opQon?

He
should
have
realized
there
was
something
wrong
with
her
when
she
was
a
toddler
and
she
got
weird
about
 learning
to
talk.

Why
had
he
helped
her
do
that?

She
wouldn’t
shut
up
now.

  • 87. “Uh,
hello?

Are
you
even
listening
to
me?”

Sabriel
waved
her
le`
hand
around
in
the
air.
 “Uh,
yeah.”

Will
paused.

“What
were
you
saying?”
 “You
should
do
something
about
the
phones.

You’ve
got
to
do
something
for
the
family,
right?

And
it
can’t
be
food,
because
 Mom
did
that.

So
maybe
it
can
be
phones.”

  • 88. “Yeah.”

How
would
be
go
about
doing
that,
exactly?

Will
took
the
darts
and
stared
at
the
board
again,
feeling
just
about
as
upset
 as
he
had
when
he
turned
up
at
the
house.

He
never
should
have
come
anywhere
near
Winterfell.

  • 89. A`er
he
finished
making
the
sandwiches,
Spencer
le`
them
to
themselves
and
headed
outside
to
meet
the
bruneLe
who
had
 walked
by.

  • 90. “I
haven’t
decided
what
I
want
to
do
yet,”
Sabriel
said
as
they
sat
down
to
eat.

“I’m
working
on
a
poliQcal
campaign
now,
but
I
 don’t
like
it
that
much.”

 “Well,
what’s
your
lifeQme
want?”

Will
asked,
hoping
to
steer
the
conversaQon
to
more
friendly
ground.

He
felt
like
he
barely
 knew
anything
about
Sabriel
now
that
she
was
a
teenager,
and
he
wanted
to
fix
that.
 “Adventure,
of
course.

Lots
of
it.

I
am
a
Stark,
a`er
all.

But,
like
you,
I
can’t
do
what
I
want.”
 What
would
you
say
if
I
told
you
I
wanted
to
woohoo
twenty
women?

Will
thought.

That
I’m
not
a
Stark?

  • 91. “No.

I
guess
not.

I
haven’t
been
able
to
do
what
I
wanted
ever
since
I
le`
for
college.”

  • 92. Sabriel
couldn’t
take
listening
to
him
anymore.

“Oh,
boo
hoo,”
she
said.
 “What?”
 “Everyone’s
been
waiQng
for
the
opportunity
to
go
to
college.

Dad,
Uncle
Brandon,
and
Grandma
wanted
it
so
badly
that
they
 had
mental
breakdowns
when
they
couldn’t
go.

Everyone’s
worked
as
hard
as
they
could
to
make
those
dreams
into
a
reality
for
 you.

What
are
you
doing?

You’re
throwing
those
dreams
away!

And
you’re
the
heir!

What
kind
of
heir
are
you
going
to
be,
if
you
 don’t
value
what
your
ancestors
have
done
for
you?”

  • 93. “One
who
doesn’t
think
that
life
should
be
all
about
work!”

Will
stamped
his
foot
on
one
of
the
table
legs.

“So
I
think
that
we
 shouldn’t
have
to
spend
every
waking
minute
at
work,
skilling,
or
trying
to
meet
our
most
basic
needs.

I
didn’t
think
that
was
a
 crime.”
 “It’s
not
like
things
are
magically
perfect
now
that
we
have
showers
and
food
again.

There’s
sQll
a
lot
to
fix—”
 “I
know!

I
know
beLer
than
you
do!

I’m
always
cold.

I’ve
been
paying
off
the
mob
for
two
years,
which
is
a
lot
harder
when
 you’re
not
sing
on
generaQons
of
money.

I
can’t
call
out,
even
though
you
don’t
seem
to
believe
me.

And
my
only
hope
of
 being
able
to
keep
geng
by
is
to
work
every
minute
of
every
day.

Don’t
tell
me
things
are
magically
perfect.”




  • 94. Will
looked
off
in
the
direcQon
of
Oldtown
as
the
light
started
to
fade.

  • 95. The
woman
who
had
walked
by
the
house
introduced
herself
as
Alayne
Stone
as
Sabriel
went
back
home,
probably
to
do
some
 more
of
that
precious
work
of
hers.

Will
thought
“totally
hot
bruneLe.”

  • 96. “What
brought
you
here?”

Will
asked
Alayne.
 “A
stroke
of
good
luck,”
she
said.
 “Good
luck?

Being
around
here?

I’m
not
sure
if
I’d
describe
it
that
way.”

  • 97. “BeLer
than
the
alternaQve,”
she
said,
heading
over
to
throw
a
dart.

“Winterfell’s
hardly
the
worst
place
in
the
world.”
 “I
guess.”

Will
shrugged.

A`er
all,
he
could
think
of
somewhere
that
was
worse.

  • 98. They
sat
down
at
the
table
a`er
their
game,
and
Will
started
explaining
the
way
his
a`ernoon
had
gone:
escaping
from
college,
 trying
to
cool
off,
and
eventually
losing
his
temper
with
Sabriel.

He
talked
about
being
the
heir
and
about
all
the
pressure
he
was
 under.

He
talked
about
his
studies
and
about
how
he
couldn’t
see
the
words
in
front
of
him
someQmes.

  • 99. She
just
listened
with
the
same
half‐smile
on
her
face.

  • 100. Special
guest
star:
Spencer
Fitzhugh,
The
Fitzhugh
Legacy,
by
smoothiequeen87
 Music
credit:
“Gangsta’s
Paradise”
‐
Coolio

  • 101. Next
Qme
on
An
Apocalypse
of
Ice:
 +
More
college
shenanigans,
or
lack
thereof.
 +
Love

 +
The
main
event
will
be
the
resoluQon
of
the
generaQon
4
heirship.

Arthur
doesn’t
seem
to
care
about
it,
but
Will
and
Sabriel
 definitely
do.

How
will
everyone
work
things
out
when
Will
comes
home
on
Tuesday
to
visit?

Will
I
be
able
to
get
all
the
photos
 that
I
need?
:P

  • 102. “LILY.

WHY
IS
THIS
PICTURE
STILL
ON
YOUR
HARD
DRIVE?

DELETE
IT
NOW!”
 Hahahaha,
never.
:P

Happy
Simming!