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NQ Holistic Approaches to Child Health Session 2
 

NQ Holistic Approaches to Child Health Session 2

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Revised Outcome 1(a) re some theoretical approaches to health. ...

Revised Outcome 1(a) re some theoretical approaches to health.
Been introduced to Outcome 1(b): Explain the basic health needs of children.
Know about the categories of basic health needs for children.
Began to examine the basic health needs of children.

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    NQ Holistic Approaches to Child Health Session 2 NQ Holistic Approaches to Child Health Session 2 Presentation Transcript

      • NQ Holistic Approaches to Child Health
      Session 2 DM40 12
      • Revised Outcome 1(a) re some theoretical approaches to health.
      • Been introduced to Outcome 1(b): Explain the basic health needs of children.
      • Know about the categories of basic health needs for children.
      • Began to examine the basic health needs of children.
      Hopefully, by the end of this session you will have:
      • Summary:
      • Hierarchy of needs – relevant to ALL people, not just for children.
      • Some needs take precedence over other needs.
      • Five levels of need – physical, safety, social, self-esteem, creativity.
      • Each level must be met before progressing to the next level – Basic needs must be met before those on the next level become important.
      • Difficult to reach full potential unless the lower level needs have been met.
      Humanistic Perspective: Abraham Maslow:
      • Summary:
      • Maslow’s theory is usually depicted in the form of a triangle to demonstrate ascendency.
      Humanistic Perspective: Abraham Maslow: Physiological needs Safety Needs Belonging/love needs Esteem needs Cognitive needs Aesthetic needs Self actualisation needs
      • Physiological needs:
      • The first human need is to live somewhere - then to obtain food, water, warmth, shelter.
      • If one of these needs is not satisfied there will be very little interest in the other needs.
      Humanistic Perspective: Abraham Maslow:
      • Security and safety needs:
      • When the physiological needs are satisfied, the next important need is security.
      • This includes the need to feel safe, out of danger.
      • Security does not only mean personal security fences, but also includes aspects such as economic security - enough money - a secure position at work, insurance policies and some type of saving.
      Humanistic Perspective: Abraham Maslow:
      • Belonging and love needs:
      • To affiliate with others, be accepted and belong.
      • This level of needs is only reached after the first two levels of needs have been satisfied.
      • There is a need to love and be loved, to belong and to be accepted by a small group, such as family and friends.
      • Often people will work hard, without reward to satisfy this need, for instance, to be accepted as a member of a committee or organization.
      Humanistic Perspective: Abraham Maslow:
      • The ego or self-esteem needs:
      • To achieve, be competent and gain approval and recognition.
      • This need manifests only after the first three needs have been satisfied.
      • This is the force that drives modern man - the need to be recognized by others, to have self-respect, to be given status, an important position, etc.
      • For some people this need is symbolized by a desire for status-car, a large office or an important job title.
      Humanistic Perspective: Abraham Maslow:
      • Cognitive needs:
      • To know, understand and explore.
      Humanistic Perspective: Abraham Maslow:
      • Aesthetic needs:
      • Symmetry, order and beauty
      Humanistic Perspective: Abraham Maslow:
      • Self actualisation/ Self realisation needs:
      • To find self-fulfilment and realise one’s potential.
      • This is the last need to be satisfied - the self-fulfilment need; the need to achieve the best that is possible; to be able to show and express your feelings and to find ways to use your talents or skills.
      • It is important to remember that once a need has been fulfilled, it no longer drives a person, i.e. there is no longer a need to meet that desire.
      Humanistic Perspective: Abraham Maslow:
      • BUT!
      • There is a tendency for needs to mix and different needs may be more important at different times, depending on the situation.
      Humanistic Perspective: Abraham Maslow:
      • Summary: Four Basic Needs:
      • The need for love and security.
      • The need for new experiences.
      • The need for praise and recognition.
      • The need for responsibility.
      Mia Kelmer Pringle:
      • Summary:
      • All needs are interrelated and interdependent.
      • This theory was developed specifically for child development.
      • For children to develop their full potential ALL needs must be met – no hierarchical sequence.
      • Concentrates on psycho-social needs – four basic needs which require to be met throughout life.
      • Early experiences and environment greatly influence later development.
      Mia Kelmer Pringle:
      • Explain the basic health needs of children.
      Introduction to Outcome 1(b):
      • Workbook page 23:
      • As you can see, a ’need’ is a requirement of life that must be satisfied in order for people to survive, grow, develop and reach their full potential.
      • Needs are not static, they vary according to age and stage of development and according to cirumstances.
      • In text books, needs are often split into different categories.
      • As seen from the WHO definition and the previous activities it’s clear that there are a number of different aspects of health.
      • Let’s look at the different aspects of health for children more closely.
      Basic Health Needs:
      • Physical health needs.
      • Social health needs.
      • Emotional health needs.
      • Cognitive health needs.
      The categories of Health Needs we will look at are: 4 Categories
      • Workbook page 24:
      • Put each of the needs listed on page 24 into the area that you feel is most relevant. (You may feel that some words fit into more than one box).
      • Share your ideas with the rest of the class.
      Paired Task:
      • Physical needs:
      • First of all, we will examine physical needs.
      • Physical health needs relate to the physical functioning of the body. For example, for our bodies to remain healthy we need:
      • Food
      • Rest and sleep
      • Warmth
      • Protection from injury
      • Exercise
      • Fresh air
      • Hygiene
      • Medical care
      Physical Health Needs:
      • Food:
      • Food is needed for growth of the body, the repair of tissues of the skin, for energy, heat control of the body, to fight off infection and to maintain all the body systems.
      • Adults providing a well balanced diet are important in maintaining a child’s healthy body.
      • Failure to have sufficient food can result in a child ‘failing to thrive’.
      • Read more about food on pages 25 and 26 of your workbook.
      • N.B. You might want to note that this is a physical need on your workbook pages guys.
      Physical Health Needs: Food
      • Paired Task: Workbook page 27:
      • All foods consist of one or more of seven types of substances listed on this page.
      • Complete the chart in relation to the diet of children.
      • Share your ideas with the rest of the class.
      Physical Health Need: Nutrition
      • Research Task: Workbook page 29:
      • Research and make notes on the different types of diet listed on page 29.
      • Note any differences in food preparation and customs associated with meals from different cultures.
      • Share your ideas with the rest of the class.
      Physical Health Need: Dietary Requirements
      • Research Task: Workbook page 29: (Answers):
      • Low sugar, low fat, high fibre with a regular intake of starchy carbohydrate foods is important to keep the child’s blood glucose level close to normal range.
      • What did YOU find out about this?
      Physical Health Need: Dietary Requirements: Diabetic Diet:
      • Research Task: Workbook page 29: (Answers):
      • Vegans exclude animal flesh, animal products and the use of animal products.
      • Lacto-vegetarians include milk and other dairy products in their diet.
      • Lacto-ovovegetarians eat dairy products, eggs and milk.
      • What did YOU find out about this?
      Physical Health Need: Dietary Requirements: Vegetarian, Vegan:
      • Research Task: Workbook page 29: (Answers):
      • Foods to be avoided:
      • Wheat, rye, oats and barley food products, biscuits, pastas, pastry, sausages.
      • Use gluten free products.
      • What did YOU find out about this?
      Physical Health Need: Dietary Requirements: Gluten Free:
      • Research Task: Workbook page 29: (Answers):
      • Foods to be avoided:
      • Food made with peanuts, peanut butter, satay sauce, peanut oil, or any nut product e.g. hazelnut chocolate spread.
      • No nut products, careful reading of food labels.
      • What did YOU find out about this?
      Physical Health Need: Dietary Requirements: Peanut Allergy:
      • Research Task: Workbook page 29: (Answers):
      • Foods to be avoided:
      • Egg, egg yolk, egg white, meringues, egg sponges, omelettes, battered foods e.g. fish fingers.
      • What did YOU find out about this?
      Physical Health Need: Dietary Requirements: Egg Allergy:
      • Research Task: Workbook page 29: (Answers):
      • Kosher Diet:
      • Cows, goats and sheep are kosher (acceptable); horses and pigs are not.
      • Fish must have scales and fins.
      • Food must be butchered and prepared in the kosher (acceptable) way.
      • Animals must be in perfect health.
      • Fruit is always kosher unless damaged.
      • What did YOU find out about this?
      Physical Health Need: Dietary Requirements: Judaism:
      • Research Task: Workbook page 29: (Answers):
      • Most Hindus are strict vegetarians, some may not even eat eggs or fish, although most will probably accept dairy products.
      • Some Hindus will eat meats but not pork, beef or beef products (the cow is considered sacred).
      • No foods or medication should contain by products of slaughtered cattle.
      • A nursery vegetarian menu will satisfy the needs of Hindu children.
      • What did YOU find out about this?
      Physical Health Need: Dietary Requirements: Hinduism:
      • Research Task: Workbook page 29: (Answers):
      • ‘ Halal’ is an Arabic word which means permissible. Halal refers to food that Muslims are permitted to consume under Islamic law.
      • Meat has to be slaughtered by a trained Muslim man in abattoirs under the supervision of an Islamic religious organisation.
      • Pork is not allowed.
      • What did YOU find out about this?
      Physical Health Need: Dietary Requirements: Islam:
      • Research Task: Workbook page 29: (Answers):
      • Diet:
      • There are not strict dietary requirements, but many Sikhs are vegatrian or do not eat beef.
      • Beef is only permitted if it is ‘jhatka’ – the animal is killed instantaneously with one stroke.
      • Those Sikhs who eat meat should not eat halal meat (animals killed according to Muslim law).
      • What did YOU find out about this?
      Physical Health Need: Dietary Requirements: Sikh: