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NQ Holistic Approaches Outcome 1 Session 1
 

NQ Holistic Approaches Outcome 1 Session 1

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This unit enables you to gain an understanding of the basic health needs of children from 0-12 years. ...

This unit enables you to gain an understanding of the basic health needs of children from 0-12 years.
You will also examine the role of professionals, carers and agencies in the promotion of child health.
You will also investigate influencing factors on the health of children.

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    NQ Holistic Approaches Outcome 1 Session 1 NQ Holistic Approaches Outcome 1 Session 1 Presentation Transcript

      • NQ Holistic Approaches to Child Health
      Session 1 DM40 12
      • Been informed about the Outcomes and assessment information about the Unit.
      • Been given some information about the structure of this unit (Statement of Standards).
      • Been introduced to Outcome 1 of the Unit.
      • Examined what is meant by the term ‘Health’.
      • Know about the ‘aspects’ or ‘dimensions’ of health.
      • Been introduced to Outcome 1(a): Describe current theoretical approaches in relation to the basic health needs of children.
      • Began to examine theoretical approaches to basic health needs.
      Hopefully, by the end of this session you will have:
    • So what is the Unit about? This unit enables you to gain an understanding of the basic health needs of children from 0-12 years. You will also examine the role of professionals, carers and agencies in the promotion of child health. You will also investigate influencing factors on the health of children.
      • Explain the basic health needs of children from 0-12 years.
      • Explain the contribution of agencies, professionals and carers in maintaining and promoting child health.
      • Evaluate the main influencing factors which affect the health of children.
      What will I be Learning About? This Unit has 3 Outcomes:
      • Basic health needs in children including children for whom additional support is required; including physical, cognitive, social and emotional needs
      • Benefits of meeting these needs and ways of ensuring health needs are being met – medical check ups, screening, immunization, health education
      • The role and responsibilities of an early years worker in recognising signs of illness in a child and being aware of common allergies
      • Statutory and voluntary agencies contributing to the promotion of child health including government initiatives, UNICEF Baby Friendly Initiative, the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child and the European Association for Children in Hospital Charter
      What will I be Learning About? You will learn about:
      • The role of agencies in the promotion of child health
      • The role of professionals and carers in promoting child health
      • Positive and negative aspects of family, socio-economic, cultural and environmental factors on the health of children
      • Impact of social trends on the health of children
      What will I be Learning About? You will learn about:
    • Evidence Requirements:
      • Outcome 1-3 Assessments:
      • The assessment for Outcomes 1, 2 and 3 is a closed book class exam folks!
      • Reading Task: Page 4:
      • Information about the Outcomes and knowledge, skills requirements for this unit may be found on page 4 of your workbook guys.
      General Information:
      • Explain the basic health needs of children from 0-12 years.
      Introduction to Outcome 1:
      • Describe current theoretical approaches in relation to the basic health needs of children.
      • Explain the basic health needs of children.
      • Investigate a range of ways in which the basic health needs of children are met.
      Outcome 1: Outcome 1 Performance Criteria – What do you need to do to achieve?
      • In this outcome we will be investigating the basic health needs of children from 0–12 years.
      • The outcome begins with a discussion of what is meant by the word ‘health’ and an examination of the different aspects of health that contribute to well-being. Different theoretical approaches to health needs are then considered concentrating on Maslow, Kellmer Pringle and Lindon.
      Outcome 1: Outcome 1 What is Outcome 1 about?
      • A range of basic health needs of young children will be reviewed encompassing physical, cognitive, social and emotional needs. The importance of these needs in contributing to the health of children and the benefits of meeting these needs will be explored.
      • Finally the ways in which the health needs of all children are met will be investigated. Different aspects of primary, secondary and tertiary child health promotion will be discussed including immunization, child health surveillance screening and health education.
      Outcome 1: Outcome 1 You also need to know about:
      • In small groups discuss what the word ‘health’ means to you.
      • Come up with as many ideas as you can then write them down.
      • When you are finished, share your ideas with the rest of the class group.
      • Right, let’s see how you got on!
      What is ‘Health’?
      • Health is a concept which means different things to different people. For example:
      • health is not being ill
      • health is being able to work and get through the day
      • health is living to a ripe old age
      • health is feeling happy
      • health is being fit and active.
      • Also…
      What is ‘Health’?
      • A person’s idea of what being healthy means is not static and their definition can change with time and circumstances.
      • Many studies into concepts of health have shown that people’s ideas of health are shaped by a number of factors such as experience, knowledge, culture, values and expectations.
      • Read pages 14 and 15 of your workbook.
      What is ‘Health’?
      • In 1948 the World Health Organization (WHO) defined health as:
      • ‘ a state of complete physical, mental and social well being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity’.
      • This was a far sighted definition for the time because it presented a holistic view, including mental and social well-being, as well as physical. It doesn’t however; allow for people to have a disability or condition and still be healthy, for example, people with conditions such as asthma, diabetes or those with a sensory impairment.
      • However...
      What is ‘Health’?
      • In 1984 the WHO updated their definition, stating that ‘health’ was:
      • ‘ the extent to which an individual or group is able, on one hand, to realize aspirations and satisfy needs: and, on the other hand, to cope with change or to cope with the environment. Health, therefore, is seen as a resource for everyday life, not an object of living: it is a positive concept emphasizing social and personal resources, as well as physical capacities.’
      • This definition also reflects the holistic approach to health as well as acknowledging the positive and transient nature of health.
      • Can you remember what ‘HOLISTIC’ means?
      What is ‘Health’?
      • Each aspect of a child’s health is so closely linked in that they all influence and interact with each other.
      • The word health itself is derived from the Old English ‘hael’ which means whole .
      • This reflects the fact that health embodies the whole person and includes all aspects of health: physical, emotional, mental, social and spiritual well-being.
      • So, what ARE the ‘ASPECTS’ of health?
      What does ‘Holistic’ mean?
      • Physical health.
      • Emotional health.
      • Cognitive health.
      • Social health.
      • Spiritual health.
      • And…
      The aspects of health we will investigate are: 7 ASPECTS
      • In addition to this the health of the individual is dependent upon everything surrounding him/her. So, we will also look at:
      • Societal health.
      • Environmental health.
      • Any ideas what each of these means?
      • Take a look at them again…
      The aspects of health we will investigate are: 7 ASPECTS
      • Physical health.
      • Emotional health.
      • Cognitive health.
      • Social health.
      • Spiritual health.
      • Societal health.
      • Environmental health.
      • Share your ideas with the rest of the class group.
      The aspects of health we will investigate are: 7 ASPECTS
      • Physical health needs relate to the functioning of the body.
      • Emotional health relates to the way we express emotions. It also relates to the way we cope with stress and anxiety.
      • Cognitive health needs relate to the ability to think clearly and logically.
      • Social health needs relate to the way we interact with others and form and maintain relationships.
      • Spiritual health can include religious beliefs but for many it relates to personal principles and values and the quest for inner peace.
      • And...
      The aspects of health mean:
      • Societal health refers to the interconnection between health and the way society is structured. It is not possible to be healthy in a society that does not provide resources for physical, emotional and cognitive health. For example, it is difficult to be emotionally and spiritually healthy in a country that does not allow personal freedom.
      • Environmental health refers to the physical environment in which the person lives, e.g. housing, transport, pollution, etc.
      • Read about these ‘HOLISTIC’ aspects of health on pages 16 and 17 of your workbook.
      The aspects of health mean:
      • Take a few minutes to consider the following questions. Note down your answers.
      • What does being healthy mean to you?
      • Think of someone you know that you think is very healthy. What is it about them that makes you think they are healthy?
      • Discuss your findings in a small group (3-4 members).
      Group Task: What is ‘Health’?
      • On a large piece of paper write a definition of health that your group is happy with.
      • You will be asked to share and compare your definition with the other groups in the class .
      Group Task: What is ‘Health’?
      • Describe current theoretical approaches in relation to the basic health needs of children.
      Introduction to Outcome 1(a):
      • After reviewing the definitions of health from the different groups, compare and/or contrast them with the official WHO definitions of health:
      • ‘ a state of complete physical, mental and social well being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity’. (WHO, 1948).
      • ‘ the extent to which an individual or group is able, on one hand, to realize aspirations and satisfy needs: and, on the other hand, to cope with change or to cope with the environment. Health, therefore, is seen as a resource for everyday life, not an object of living: it is a positive concept emphasizing social and personal resources, as well as physical capacities.’ (WHO, 1984).
      Group Task: What is ‘Health’?
      • Theories are the ways in which people, or groups of people, explain their own particular ideas and opinions about things.
      • Several different theorists have looked at the needs of children. In this section we are going to look at three of the best known opinions on needs:
      • Maslow
      • Mia Kellmer Pringle
      • Jennie Lindon.
      Theoretical Approaches to Basic Health Needs: Page 19:
      • Abraham Maslow:
      • A great deal has been written about human needs.
      • Maslow (1943) put forward a theory in which he distinguishes these needs in order of importance.
      • Read about this on pages 19-21(top) .
      • In groups, consider Maslow’s theory in terms of your own needs as a child and as an adult.
      • Does your group agree with Maslow’s theory?
      • Give justifications for your decision.
      Humanistic Perspective: Abraham Maslow:
      • Abraham Maslow:
      • Maslow’s theory is well known.
      • Try to relate the levels of the pyramid to your own life.
      • Discuss.
      Humanistic Perspective: Abraham Maslow:
      • Maslow’s Theory in Practice: Group Tasks:
      • What can Early Education and Childcare workers do to support this hierarchy of needs in the child?
      • Group 1: Self-actualisation needs.
      • Group 2: Esteem needs.
      • Group 3: Belongingness and Love needs.
      • Group 4: Safety needs.
      • Group 5: Physiological or Basic needs.
      • Share your ideas with the rest of the class group.
      Humanistic Perspective: Abraham Maslow:
      • Group 1: Self Actualisation Needs:
      • By being enthusiastic and supportive
      • By encouraging children to develop projects and plans
      • By supporting the child through planning, implementation and evaluation cycle
      • By encouraging the child’s ideas and dreams
      Humanistic Perspective: Abraham Maslow:
      • Group 2: Esteem Needs:
      • By praising effort and determination
      • By encouraging independence
      • By showing respect to all children, their beliefs and belongings
      • By being supportive
      • By treating children with dignity
      Humanistic Perspective: Abraham Maslow:
      • Group 3: Belongingness and Love Needs:
      • By listening to children
      • By showing care and consideration
      • By being patient and kind
      • By showing respect for child’s family
      • By encouraging cooperation and interaction with others
      Humanistic Perspective: Abraham Maslow:
      • Group 4: Safety Needs:
      • By knowing and following policies and procedures
      • By providing a safe and secure environment
      • By being alert to potential hazards, risks or dangers
      • By maintaining confidentiality
      • By observation and recording accurately
      Humanistic Perspective: Abraham Maslow:
      • Group 5: Physiological or Basic Needs:
      • By providing opportunities for play, exercise and rest
      • By providing healthy snacks and drinks
      • By providing a warm and welcoming environment
      Humanistic Perspective: Abraham Maslow:
      • Summary:
      • In Maslow’s theory of human needs, developmental needs were thought to be hierarchical in nature. That is, the most basic needs were those necessary for survival (i.e. need for food and water). Once these needs had been met, higher needs such as the need for a loving relationship would emerge.
      • It is now widely held that ALL human needs are INTER-RELATED and INTER-DEPENDENT in a subtle, complex and continuous way.
      Humanistic Perspective: Abraham Maslow:
      • Reading Task: Page 21:
      • Read about the theories of Mia Kelmer Pringle and Jennie Lindon on page 21.
      Other Theories:
      • Page 22:
      • Using your own words, produce a short summary of the three theories.
      • Compare and contrast the three theories by:
      • detailing the similarities
      • detailing the differences
      • Summarise the perceived strengths and weaknesses of each approach.
      • This information will be useful when you are preparing for assessment.
      Theories: Homework Task: