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Science At Ud

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presenting assistive technology

presenting assistive technology

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  • Teachers :address elements necessary for the achievement of desired educational goals and objectives. Teachers are designers. They design activities, materials and curricula. Equitable Provide the same means for all users. If a science class has binoculars for field trips, then at least one pair should have image stabilization which allow a tired person or one with motor problems to use the same device. All students should be able to physically access the activity.Should be able to lift items, carry objects, turn knobs, press keys and or move computer mice. Alternative means must be available if they are unable to physically engage in the activity.
  • The product, system and environment must effectively communicate necessary information to the user. Utilize multiple modes of information presentation - verbal, iconic, pictorial, tactile. Provide contrast between the information and its surroundings. The expanded use of sound field systems exemplifies this principle. Students perform better academically. On any given day students have temporary hearing problems due to colds, flu, allergies and fatigue. Different representations such as concept maps and then outline form appeal to different learning styles.
  • Interactive science software: Zap and Virtual Lab by Edmark for upper elementary and Thinkin’ Science for grades 1 & 2, Sammy’s Science House for pre-K. Logger Pro by Vernier software - science software that records data from separate sensors and performs graph analysis - can be connected to a graphing calculator. Can use an overlay of a periodic table for writing chemical equations. Can use Reach Interface Author to customize a periodic table for chemistry. Use Inspiration/Kidspiration to help students organize reports, procedure charts for science experiments and other smart charts. Wordbar, and word predictors (Co:Writer, Soothsayer, Word Q) can be used to help write science assignments. Dictionaries within a word predictor can be created to specify science or math terms. Digital microscopes (Intelplay from Mattel) also from Edmund Scientific and other science oriented vendors. Viewing can be displayed on to a computer or projected onto a screen. Voice Input can be used to help students write science reports.
  • Clicker 4 and IntelliTalk II authoring software with speech output for all levels of math and science - used to create templates for science report, tests, study guides - both have graphic capabilities.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Assistive Technology for Science Classes Jorge S Mustafa Representing Assistive Technology Resource
    • 2. Objectives
      • Increase knowledge of assistive technology.
      • Increase understanding of universal design.
      • Increase awareness of tools for science .
    • 3. Definition of Assistive Technology (AT) The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) defines assistive technology devices as “any piece of equipment, or product system, whether acquired commercially off the shelf, modified, or customized, that is used to increase, maintain, or improve functional capabilities of children with disabilities.”
    • 4. SETT by Joy Zabala (1994) S TUDENT – What are the student’s special needs and abilities? Why does the student need AT? E NVIRONMENT – Where will the student use AT? What supports, resources are available? T ASKS – What IEP goals will be addressed with AT? What activities is the student expected to do? T OOLS – What assistive technology (no/low tech, and high tech) options should be considered to address the tasks? What strategies might be used to increase student performance? A Framework for considering assistive technology
    • 5. Universal Design For Learning
      • Teachers are designers. They design activities , materials and curricula.
      • Coupling between abilities and task requirements
      • Targets educational needs of all students while addressing different learning styles.
      • Technology increases the adaptability and flexibility.
    • 6. Physically and Cognitively Accessible
      • Wheelchair accessibility, alternative keyboards, screen readers.
      • Perceptual accessibility - color blindness, hearing loss or visual impairments.
      • Cognitively impaired as well as different learning styles and strengths.
      • Multiple ways of engaging the material, presenting the material and reporting results.
    • 7. Universal Design
      • Utilize multiple modes of information presentation - verbal, iconic, pictorial, tactile.
      • Provide contrast between the information and its surroundings. The expanded use of sound field systems exemplifies this principle. Students perform better academically. On any given day students have temporary hearing problems due to colds, flu, allergies and fatigue.
      • Different representations such as concept maps and then outline form appeal to different learning styles.
    • 8. Tasks for Science
      • Performing experiments
      • Recording observations
      • Collecting & Recording data (measuring)
      • Analyzing Data - graphs
      • Writing Science/Lab Reports
      • Reading science textbooks, research
      • Using scientific calculators, converting units
      • Studying and Test taking
      • List is not comprehensive, but examples
    • 9. Science Tools
      • Interactive science software: Zap and Virtual Lab by Edmark for upper elementary and Thinkin’ Science for grades 1 & 2, Sammy’s Science House for pre-K.
      • Logger Pro by Vernier software - science software that records data from separate sensors and performs graph analysis - can be connected to a graphing calculator.
    • 10. Tools for Science
      • Overlay of a periodic table for writing chemical equations.
      • Reach Interface Author to customize a periodic table for chemistry.
      • Inspiration/Kidspiration to help students organize reports, procedure charts for science experiments and other smart charts.
    • 11. Tools
      • Wordbar, and word predictors (Co:Writer, Soothsayer, Word Q, Text Help: Read & Write) can be used to help write science assignments. Dictionaries within a word predictor can be created to specify science terms.
    • 12. Tools
      • Digital microscopes (Intelplay from Mattel) also from Edmund Scientific, Motic Play (www.moticplay.com) and other science oriented vendors. Viewing can be displayed on to a computer or projected onto a screen.
      • Voice Input can be used to help students write science reports. (Dragon Naturally Speaking version 7)
    • 13. Assistive Technology is used to increase a student’s learning through increased participation in activities. By employing a “hands on” approach, the teacher creates an opportunity to engage the student’s mind.