1213 art3ren short

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Renaissance crash course for my students.

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  • Out of the dark ages into the enlightenment.... \nWhat does that mean?\n
  • Out of the dark ages into the enlightenment.... \nWhat does that mean?\n
  • Out of the dark ages into the enlightenment.... \nWhat does that mean?\n
  • Out of the dark ages into the enlightenment.... \nWhat does that mean?\n
  • Out of the dark ages into the enlightenment.... \nWhat does that mean?\n
  • Out of the dark ages into the enlightenment.... \nWhat does that mean?\n
  • Out of the dark ages into the enlightenment.... \nWhat does that mean?\n
  • Out of the dark ages into the enlightenment.... \nWhat does that mean?\n
  • Out of the dark ages into the enlightenment.... \nWhat does that mean?\n
  • Out of the dark ages into the enlightenment.... \nWhat does that mean?\n
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  • What does Renaissance mean?\n
  • What does Renaissance mean?\n
  • What does Renaissance mean?\n
  • What does Renaissance mean?\n
  • What does Renaissance mean?\n
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  • Key characteristics:\nNaturalism\nAllegory - What does that mean fable: a short moral story (often with animal characters)\nemblem: a visible symbol representing an abstract idea\nan expressive style that uses fictional characters and events to describe some subject by suggestive resemblances; an extended metaphor\n\ndepth -how?\n
  • Key characteristics:\nNaturalism\nAllegory - What does that mean fable: a short moral story (often with animal characters)\nemblem: a visible symbol representing an abstract idea\nan expressive style that uses fictional characters and events to describe some subject by suggestive resemblances; an extended metaphor\n\ndepth -how?\n
  • Key characteristics:\nNaturalism\nAllegory - What does that mean fable: a short moral story (often with animal characters)\nemblem: a visible symbol representing an abstract idea\nan expressive style that uses fictional characters and events to describe some subject by suggestive resemblances; an extended metaphor\n\ndepth -how?\n
  • Key characteristics:\nNaturalism\nAllegory - What does that mean fable: a short moral story (often with animal characters)\nemblem: a visible symbol representing an abstract idea\nan expressive style that uses fictional characters and events to describe some subject by suggestive resemblances; an extended metaphor\n\ndepth -how?\n
  • Key characteristics:\nNaturalism\nAllegory - What does that mean fable: a short moral story (often with animal characters)\nemblem: a visible symbol representing an abstract idea\nan expressive style that uses fictional characters and events to describe some subject by suggestive resemblances; an extended metaphor\n\ndepth -how?\n
  • Key characteristics:\nNaturalism\nAllegory - What does that mean fable: a short moral story (often with animal characters)\nemblem: a visible symbol representing an abstract idea\nan expressive style that uses fictional characters and events to describe some subject by suggestive resemblances; an extended metaphor\n\ndepth -how?\n
  • Key characteristics:\nNaturalism\nAllegory - What does that mean fable: a short moral story (often with animal characters)\nemblem: a visible symbol representing an abstract idea\nan expressive style that uses fictional characters and events to describe some subject by suggestive resemblances; an extended metaphor\n\ndepth -how?\n
  • Key characteristics:\nNaturalism\nAllegory - What does that mean fable: a short moral story (often with animal characters)\nemblem: a visible symbol representing an abstract idea\nan expressive style that uses fictional characters and events to describe some subject by suggestive resemblances; an extended metaphor\n\ndepth -how?\n
  • Key characteristics:\nNaturalism\nAllegory - What does that mean fable: a short moral story (often with animal characters)\nemblem: a visible symbol representing an abstract idea\nan expressive style that uses fictional characters and events to describe some subject by suggestive resemblances; an extended metaphor\n\ndepth -how?\n
  • Key characteristics:\nNaturalism\nAllegory - What does that mean fable: a short moral story (often with animal characters)\nemblem: a visible symbol representing an abstract idea\nan expressive style that uses fictional characters and events to describe some subject by suggestive resemblances; an extended metaphor\n\ndepth -how?\n
  • Key characteristics:\nNaturalism\nAllegory - What does that mean fable: a short moral story (often with animal characters)\nemblem: a visible symbol representing an abstract idea\nan expressive style that uses fictional characters and events to describe some subject by suggestive resemblances; an extended metaphor\n\ndepth -how?\n
  • Key characteristics:\nNaturalism\nAllegory - What does that mean fable: a short moral story (often with animal characters)\nemblem: a visible symbol representing an abstract idea\nan expressive style that uses fictional characters and events to describe some subject by suggestive resemblances; an extended metaphor\n\ndepth -how?\n
  • Key characteristics:\nNaturalism\nAllegory - What does that mean fable: a short moral story (often with animal characters)\nemblem: a visible symbol representing an abstract idea\nan expressive style that uses fictional characters and events to describe some subject by suggestive resemblances; an extended metaphor\n\ndepth -how?\n
  • Key characteristics:\nNaturalism\nAllegory - What does that mean fable: a short moral story (often with animal characters)\nemblem: a visible symbol representing an abstract idea\nan expressive style that uses fictional characters and events to describe some subject by suggestive resemblances; an extended metaphor\n\ndepth -how?\n
  • Key characteristics:\nNaturalism\nAllegory - What does that mean fable: a short moral story (often with animal characters)\nemblem: a visible symbol representing an abstract idea\nan expressive style that uses fictional characters and events to describe some subject by suggestive resemblances; an extended metaphor\n\ndepth -how?\n
  • Order over passion. Mathematical. Opposite of gothic emotionalism\n
  • Another popular explanation for the Italian Renaissance is the thesis, first advanced by historian Hans Baron,[7] that states that the primary impetus of the early Renaissance was the long-running series of wars between Florence and Milan. By the late 14th century, Milan had become a centralized monarchy under the control of the Visconti family. Giangaleazzo Visconti, who ruled the city from 1378 to 1402, was renowned both for his cruelty and for his abilities, and set about building an empire in Northern Italy. He launched a long series of wars, with Milan steadily conquering neighbouring states and defeating the various coalitions led by Florence that sought in vain to halt the advance. This culminated in the 1402 siege of Florence, when it looked as though the city was doomed to fall, before Giangaleazzo suddenly died and his empire collapsed.\nBaron's thesis suggests that during these long wars, the leading figures of Florence rallied the people by presenting the war as one between the free republic and the despotic monarchy, between the ideals of the Greek and Roman Republics and those of the Roman Empire and Medieval kingdoms. For Baron, the most important figure in crafting this ideology was Leonardo Bruni. This time of crisis in Florence was the period when most of the major early Renaissance figures were coming of age, such as Ghiberti, Donatello, Masolino, and Brunelleschi, and that they were inculcated with this republican ideology. These and other figures later went on to advocate republican ideas that were to have an enormous impact on the Renaissance.\n\n
  • Another popular explanation for the Italian Renaissance is the thesis, first advanced by historian Hans Baron,[7] that states that the primary impetus of the early Renaissance was the long-running series of wars between Florence and Milan. By the late 14th century, Milan had become a centralized monarchy under the control of the Visconti family. Giangaleazzo Visconti, who ruled the city from 1378 to 1402, was renowned both for his cruelty and for his abilities, and set about building an empire in Northern Italy. He launched a long series of wars, with Milan steadily conquering neighbouring states and defeating the various coalitions led by Florence that sought in vain to halt the advance. This culminated in the 1402 siege of Florence, when it looked as though the city was doomed to fall, before Giangaleazzo suddenly died and his empire collapsed.\nBaron's thesis suggests that during these long wars, the leading figures of Florence rallied the people by presenting the war as one between the free republic and the despotic monarchy, between the ideals of the Greek and Roman Republics and those of the Roman Empire and Medieval kingdoms. For Baron, the most important figure in crafting this ideology was Leonardo Bruni. This time of crisis in Florence was the period when most of the major early Renaissance figures were coming of age, such as Ghiberti, Donatello, Masolino, and Brunelleschi, and that they were inculcated with this republican ideology. These and other figures later went on to advocate republican ideas that were to have an enormous impact on the Renaissance.\n\n
  • Another popular explanation for the Italian Renaissance is the thesis, first advanced by historian Hans Baron,[7] that states that the primary impetus of the early Renaissance was the long-running series of wars between Florence and Milan. By the late 14th century, Milan had become a centralized monarchy under the control of the Visconti family. Giangaleazzo Visconti, who ruled the city from 1378 to 1402, was renowned both for his cruelty and for his abilities, and set about building an empire in Northern Italy. He launched a long series of wars, with Milan steadily conquering neighbouring states and defeating the various coalitions led by Florence that sought in vain to halt the advance. This culminated in the 1402 siege of Florence, when it looked as though the city was doomed to fall, before Giangaleazzo suddenly died and his empire collapsed.\nBaron's thesis suggests that during these long wars, the leading figures of Florence rallied the people by presenting the war as one between the free republic and the despotic monarchy, between the ideals of the Greek and Roman Republics and those of the Roman Empire and Medieval kingdoms. For Baron, the most important figure in crafting this ideology was Leonardo Bruni. This time of crisis in Florence was the period when most of the major early Renaissance figures were coming of age, such as Ghiberti, Donatello, Masolino, and Brunelleschi, and that they were inculcated with this republican ideology. These and other figures later went on to advocate republican ideas that were to have an enormous impact on the Renaissance.\n\n
  • Another popular explanation for the Italian Renaissance is the thesis, first advanced by historian Hans Baron,[7] that states that the primary impetus of the early Renaissance was the long-running series of wars between Florence and Milan. By the late 14th century, Milan had become a centralized monarchy under the control of the Visconti family. Giangaleazzo Visconti, who ruled the city from 1378 to 1402, was renowned both for his cruelty and for his abilities, and set about building an empire in Northern Italy. He launched a long series of wars, with Milan steadily conquering neighbouring states and defeating the various coalitions led by Florence that sought in vain to halt the advance. This culminated in the 1402 siege of Florence, when it looked as though the city was doomed to fall, before Giangaleazzo suddenly died and his empire collapsed.\nBaron's thesis suggests that during these long wars, the leading figures of Florence rallied the people by presenting the war as one between the free republic and the despotic monarchy, between the ideals of the Greek and Roman Republics and those of the Roman Empire and Medieval kingdoms. For Baron, the most important figure in crafting this ideology was Leonardo Bruni. This time of crisis in Florence was the period when most of the major early Renaissance figures were coming of age, such as Ghiberti, Donatello, Masolino, and Brunelleschi, and that they were inculcated with this republican ideology. These and other figures later went on to advocate republican ideas that were to have an enormous impact on the Renaissance.\n\n
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  • 1213 art3ren short

    1. 1. GOTHIC
    2. 2. 1100-140 0
    3. 3. 1401
    4. 4. Renaissance
    5. 5. “rebirth”
    6. 6. highRenaissance
    7. 7. 1401-1492
    8. 8. naturalism
    9. 9. allegory
    10. 10. depth
    11. 11. Brunelleschi • Brunelleschi created the early Renaissance, Architecturally • First to study the exact measurements of ancient monuments • Invented linear perspective • Won the building of the Florence Cathedral Dome- created a new way of distributing weight and a new hoisting machine for construction • Interior- order rather than Passion. Precise andSan Lorenzo 1421-69 mathematical
    12. 12. Brunelleschi • Brunelleschi created the early Renaissance, Architecturally • First to study the exact measurements of ancient monuments • Invented linear perspective • Won the building of the Florence Cathedral Dome- created a new way of distributing weight and a new hoisting machine for construction • Interior- order rather than Passion. Precise andSan Lorenzo 1421-69 mathematical
    13. 13. WhyFlorence?
    14. 14. WhyFlorence?
    15. 15. Duke of Milan Why Francesco Sforza Florence?
    16. 16. Duke of Milan Why Francesco Sforza Florence?
    17. 17. Duke of Milan Why Francesco Sforza Florence?
    18. 18. Brunelleschi Florence Cathedral Dome 1417
    19. 19. Brunelleschi Florence Cathedral Dome 1417
    20. 20. Brunelleschi Cupola - A rounded convex roof on a circular base; a dome of a small size. Florence Cathedral Dome 1417
    21. 21. compare... • Life-sized figures • Mass and volume much more realistic than Medieval • Heads based on Roman sculpture • This time form and content are not separated like in MedievalNanni di Banco, Four Saints, c.1410-14
    22. 22. compare... • Life-sized figures • Mass and volume much more realistic than Medieval • Heads based on Roman sculpture • This time form and content are not separated like in Medieval Jamb statues, west portalNanni di Banco, Four Saints, c.1410-14 Chartres Cathedral 1145-70
    23. 23. Donatello Based on Classical proportions Symbolic of struggle between Florence and MilanDavid, 1425-30, Bronze
    24. 24. Donatello Humanism - renewed interest in art & writings of antiquity. A belief that the body is beautiful. Based on Classical proportions Symbolic of struggle between Florence and MilanDavid, 1425-30, Bronze
    25. 25. Donatello Based on Classical proportions Symbolic of struggle between Florence and MilanDavid, 1425-30, Bronze
    26. 26. Donatello Based on Classical proportions Symbolic of struggle between Florence and MilanDavid, 1425-30, Bronze
    27. 27. Donatello Based on Classical proportions Symbolic of struggle between Florence and MilanDavid, 1425-30, Bronze
    28. 28. Donatello Based on Classical proportions Symbolic of struggle between Florence and MilanDavid, 1425-30, Bronze
    29. 29. MasaccioThe Tribute Money c. 1427
    30. 30. Masaccio Three scenes in one painting DidacticThe Tribute Money c. 1427 Use of Perspective Christ is the Vanishing Point Fresco Figures treated Sculpturally
    31. 31. compare...
    32. 32. Botticelli Mythological Allegorical Illustrative Savanarola Neo-platonismThe Birth of Venus, 1480, Tempera on Canvas
    33. 33. Neo-platonism - Philosophical Botticelli attempt to justify Humanism with Christianity by rationalizing pagan imagery as metaphor. Mythological Allegorical Illustrative Savanarola Neo-platonismThe Birth of Venus, 1480, Tempera on Canvas
    34. 34. Review
    35. 35. Review Why was Florence the birthplace of the Renaissance?
    36. 36. Review Why was Florence the birthplace of the Renaissance? How did Science and Mathematics became tools of the artist?
    37. 37. Review Why was Florence the birthplace of the Renaissance? How did Science and Mathematics became tools of the artist? How is ancient Rome and Greece are sources for inspiration?
    38. 38. Review Why was Florence the birthplace of the Renaissance? How did Science and Mathematics became tools of the artist? How is ancient Rome and Greece are sources for inspiration? What is Humanism and how does it differ from Neo- platonism?
    39. 39. Review Why was Florence the birthplace of the Renaissance? How did Science and Mathematics became tools of the artist? How is ancient Rome and Greece are sources for inspiration? What is Humanism and how does it differ from Neo- platonism? Name some characteristics of Early Renaissance art and architechure?
    40. 40. 1450
    41. 41. High Renaissance
    42. 42. Balance
    43. 43. Heroic
    44. 44. Sfumato
    45. 45. Key Concepts Rome becomes center of the art in Europe The notion of Artist as Genius is born Chiaroscuro Sfumato painterly
    46. 46. • Very atmospheric, figures emerge from the background (sfumato) -makes the painting intimate • Do not know who the other figures are and its hard to place the symbolism but painting is very simpleLeonardo Da Vinci, The Virgin of the Rocks c. 1485
    47. 47. MichelangeloDavid1501-4Marble -Michelangelo (1475-1564) -considered a genius by others and by himself- sometimes he thought of this as a curse -he thought that he should answer to no human because of his genius -sculptor first- only thing that satisfied him was to “liberate real three-dimensional bodies from recalcitrant matter”- kind of like God! -the human figure as the ultimate vehicle for expression linked him with the Greeks-all of his figures have Pathos -David commissioned in 1501 (he was 26!) Meant to be placed high on Florence Cathedral but moved to the center of Florence -Has pent up energy, action in repose, very unlike Donatello Had spent time in Rome studying Laocoon and other Hellenistic work
    48. 48. Raphael, School of Athens, 1510-11-Raphael was working at the Vatican at the same time as Michelangelo-in the Pope’s library- Frescos represented the liberal arts-This one is about philosophy- its considered Raphael’s masterpiece-he had probably seen the Sistine Chapel and was influenced by it-similar feel as the last supper- attention to the individual
    49. 49. Review
    50. 50. Review • Both a culmination of the early Renaissance and a departure from it
    51. 51. Review • Both a culmination of the early Renaissance and a departure from it • Viewed the artist as a genius rather than a craftsman- creation rather than making
    52. 52. Review • Both a culmination of the early Renaissance and a departure from it • Viewed the artist as a genius rather than a craftsman- creation rather than making • This caused the patrons of the Renaissance to spend vast amounts of money and the artists to devote a huge amount of time
    53. 53. Review • Both a culmination of the early Renaissance and a departure from it • Viewed the artist as a genius rather than a craftsman- creation rather than making • This caused the patrons of the Renaissance to spend vast amounts of money and the artists to devote a huge amount of time • Less concerned with rational order and more with visual effectiveness
    54. 54. Review • Both a culmination of the early Renaissance and a departure from it • Viewed the artist as a genius rather than a craftsman- creation rather than making • This caused the patrons of the Renaissance to spend vast amounts of money and the artists to devote a huge amount of time • Less concerned with rational order and more with visual effectiveness • New drama meant to engage the viewer
    55. 55. Review • Both a culmination of the early Renaissance and a departure from it • Viewed the artist as a genius rather than a craftsman- creation rather than making • This caused the patrons of the Renaissance to spend vast amounts of money and the artists to devote a huge amount of time • Less concerned with rational order and more with visual effectiveness • New drama meant to engage the viewer • Key monuments all produced between 1495 and 1520
    56. 56. Review • Both a culmination of the early Renaissance and a departure from it • Viewed the artist as a genius rather than a craftsman- creation rather than making • This caused the patrons of the Renaissance to spend vast amounts of money and the artists to devote a huge amount of time • Less concerned with rational order and more with visual effectiveness • New drama meant to engage the viewer • Key monuments all produced between 1495 and 1520
    57. 57. Mannerism Parmigianino Madonna with the Long Neck (1534-40) Oil exaggerated stylized
    58. 58. Mannerism Parmigianino Madonna with the Long Neck (1534-40) Oil
    59. 59. Mannerism El Greco Laocoon 1608-1614 Oil
    60. 60. Caravaggio Baroque The Calling of St. Matthew 1599-1600 Oil
    61. 61. Jan van Eyck Northern Renaissance The Arnolfini Wedding 1434 oil on panel
    62. 62. Discussion Questions What are the primary stylistic achievements of the 15th-century Italian artist? How do these traits reflect a change in mans view of spirituality and the emergence of Humanism? Do important political families today patronize the arts as during the Renaissance? Why or why not? Can you cite examples?

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