The Advanced User Interface –                                                                                             ...
The Advanced User Interface –                 Essential for the Safe and Connected Car        AutoTechinsider LLC White Pa...
The Advanced User Interface –                 Essential for the Safe and Connected Car        AutoTechinsider LLC White Pa...
The Advanced User Interface –                 Essential for the Safe and Connected Car        AutoTechinsider LLC White Pa...
The Advanced User Interface –                 Essential for the Safe and Connected Car        AutoTechinsider LLC White Pa...
The Advanced User Interface –                 Essential for the Safe and Connected Car        AutoTechinsider LLC White Pa...
The Advanced User Interface –                 Essential for the Safe and Connected Car        AutoTechinsider LLC White Pa...
The Advanced User Interface –                 Essential for the Safe and Connected Car        AutoTechinsider LLC White Pa...
The Advanced User Interface –                 Essential for the Safe and Connected Car           AutoTechinsider LLC White...
The Advanced User Interface –                 Essential for the Safe and Connected Car        AutoTechinsider LLC White Pa...
The Advanced User Interface –                 Essential for the Safe and Connected Car           AutoTechinsider LLC White...
The Advanced User Interface –                 Essential for the Safe and Connected Car        AutoTechinsider LLC White Pa...
The Advanced User Interface –                 Essential for the Safe and Connected Car        AutoTechinsider LLC White Pa...
The Advanced User Interface –                       Essential for the Safe and Connected Car              AutoTechinsider ...
The Advanced User Interface –                                                                                             ...
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Advanced Hmi Autotechinsider White Paper 11 10

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Why the Automotive UI – Strategic to the Brand and sells more Cars.

Take our latest survey and receive the results to understand why.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/AUTO_UI_2012_1

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Advanced Hmi Autotechinsider White Paper 11 10

  1. 1. The Advanced User Interface – Essential for the Safe and Connected Car AutoTechinsider LLC White Paper November 2010  The Automotive UI – Strategic to the BrandThe auto industry is getting a “bum wrap”, as they say. Every article that we have read overthe last few years characterized our industry as conventional, conservative or “old-school”,that is, resistive to adapting new ideas. Not true – our auto industry is undergoingtremendous change and is embracing technologies to produce a connected, green and safercar. As Charles Dickens said in the Tale of Two Cities, “It was the best of times, it was theworst of times…” The US auto industry is emerging from the worst of financial times, theworst crisis it has faced since the depression. Fortunately, our Industry has embracedtechnologies that will produce the “best” possible driving experience for the driving pubic. TheFord Motor Company is held up as the shining example of embracing change with SYNC asthe marquee product. Ford is selling more cars with compelling technology and what istermed the signature-branded User Interface (UI). “Ford SYNC has shown there is a demandfor advanced UIs,” according to Joe Kennedy, president of Pandora. Ford was the first OEMto announce Internet radio in the car!Customers crave newfeatures, especially thoserelated to entertainment.These new features are nowcalled ‘applications’ becausethey work on variouscomputing or smart phoneplatforms and in various cars.The Apple app store is thefastest growing enterprise. OnJanuary 16, 2009, Appleannounced that 500 millionapps had been downloaded;the billionth application wasdownloaded only four monthslater.1 Ford announced at theJanuary 2010 ConsumerElectronics Show that a SYNCcar would supportdownloadable apps stores.Other OEMs are quicklyresponding, ushering in thebest of times for the drivingpublic.                                                                                                                1 http://www.apple.com/ca/press/2009_04/app_store.htmlDave  McNamara  -­‐  Autotechinsder  LLC     1   November  8,  2010  
  2. 2. The Advanced User Interface – Essential for the Safe and Connected Car AutoTechinsider LLC White Paper November 2010  The advanced UI is strategic to getting more features/functions in the car. AutotechinsiderLLC has quantified the UI space as a large and growing business. We conducted a recentstudy for Telematics Update Business Intelligence, which quantified a $1.8 Billion market in2013 for displays, software, and controls - switches/haptics. The overall HMI revenue with aCAGR of about 14% (2009-2016) is significant. New hardware components will be added toallow drivers and passengers to access new features, especially connected vehicle services.HMI components are estimated at about 2-3% of overall total ADAS and infotainment costs,which are growing at about a 7–8% annual rate. In conclusion, growth not de-contenting ofvehicles can be expected. The HMI is the all- important means to bring new content into thevehicle. Hence, the HMI is strategic and worthy of investment as a new, affordable robusttechnology becomes available. The size of the HMI OpportunityDave  McNamara  -­‐  Autotechinsder  LLC     2   November  8,  2010  
  3. 3. The Advanced User Interface – Essential for the Safe and Connected Car AutoTechinsider LLC White Paper November 2010  If this is not enough, safety systems, specifically Diver Assistance Systems (DAS), are thefastest growing auto elecs. segment, with ACC and side vision as the vanguard.i In the past,ABS, seat belts and airbags were high safety wants. Today, OEMs are positioning DASespecially on luxury vehicles as a key product differentiator. On top of this new infrastructurebased safety features, based on Vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) and Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I)or I2V will show up in cars in the 2014-17 time frame. As shown in the chart on the nextpage, these new safety features will have significant impact on the automotive UI. Pleasevisit the IntelliDriveSM website, www.intelidrive.org, to see the videos of Intersection collisionwarning/mitigation features to see first how drivers will benefit.ii The goal in mind iseventually autonomous driving or cooperative driving. The Volvo City Driving feature, stop-and-go ACC is a forerunner of new “autonomous driving” to allow hands off the wheel andfoot off the accelerator driving under certain conditions.iii It’s easy to envision stop-and-goACC evolving into “Platooning” – the driver relies on the system for low speed driving, joininga group of vehicles travelling faster than the “congestion” speed. Today, new ADAS systemsrequire the driver to be fully responsible for mitigating any collision, e.g. blind spot detectionand lane departure. Autonomous driving is a ways off, therefore, capable HMIs will beneeded to support all this new information presented to the driver.Dave  McNamara  -­‐  Autotechinsder  LLC     3   November  8,  2010  
  4. 4. The Advanced User Interface – Essential for the Safe and Connected Car AutoTechinsider LLC White Paper November 2010  As shown below new features/functions, such as forward collision, night vision, intersectionsafety, do not pass, etc. will have a major design impact on the UI requiring newtechnologies. For example, several of the HMI experts we interviewed indicated the need forHeads-Up displays (HUDs) as the means to get new safe treated information into the car.Even though HMI experts agree auditory alerts, especially the “alarm bell” type get ourattention, we need a visual display in the field of view with the critical information as to thenature of the alert. The Impact of new features/functions on the automotive HMIDave  McNamara  -­‐  Autotechinsder  LLC     4   November  8,  2010  
  5. 5. The Advanced User Interface – Essential for the Safe and Connected Car AutoTechinsider LLC White Paper November 2010  The basis of this article is the author’s work to compile a comprehensive report for TelematicsUpdate Business Intelligence, titled “The Automotive User Interface the Key BrandDifferentiator”.iv In-depth interviews with more than 30 experts in the U.S. and Europe wereconducted and 75 users and decision makers were surveyed. These industry leaders agreedon the strategic importance of the HMI and that their customers wanted both new safety andconnectivity features! OEMs are learning from Apple and the CE industry to be user-experience focused versus developing task-centric UIs. Great user experiences are clearlydefined by the iPhone and iPod, according to the Telematics Update survey and expertinterviews. “Apple has showed us that there is a market for the better user interface, Theytook complex devices and made them simple – hiding the complexity”, according to RodMacKenzie ITS-America’s CTO. What translates well from the CE world to the automotiveword is still a subject of debate, however. Defining the user experience for the car meansincluding a wide range of features and functions, encompassing safety, infotainment, andnow the use of devices outside the car (remote control apps, for example).The experts described to us why the advanced UI is important, as:1. A brand differentiator, overall the car is easier to use and safer than the competition2. An enabler of valued safety features/functions: the need to integrate new DAS features and deal with infotainment-related distraction issues3. Improved time-to-market with new features; the UI has now become a constraint, new adaptable platforms and tools are needed4. A response to consumer demand - affordable, capable UIs are moving downscale because consumers want them5. A response to the Consumer Electronics (CE) industry. The CE industry drives demand, but doesn’t design with driving in mind and can’t do integration at the car level. OEMs need to take control and build a capable UI platform.The HMI Development Process is the Key EnablerOEMs think they are best at designing the UI with driving as the primary task. “The CEindustry doesn’t design with driving in mind” explains why the industry is viewed as slow andconservative. The OEM HMI development process is resource and time consuming. Theprocess is geared to minimize the risk of inappropriate customer “field testing” andimportantly distraction. But, everyone today agrees that safety features and connectivity sellcars. How to get all these features/functions in the car while meeting the highest quality,reliability and affordability?The OEMs and Suppliers interviewed and our on-line survey described the “best-in-class”development process as keeping these goals in mind:74.0% of respondents listed easy-to-use/simple12.3% of respondents listed safe to use5.5%of respondents listed aesthetics/attractiveness2.7%of respondents listed cost valueDave  McNamara  -­‐  Autotechinsder  LLC     5   November  8,  2010  
  6. 6. The Advanced User Interface – Essential for the Safe and Connected Car AutoTechinsider LLC White Paper November 2010  The industry as a first step has participated in government and industry cooperative efforts asthe means to understand key safety related problems .The Collision Avoidance MetricsPartnership (CAMP) is the key industry effort, in collaboration with NHTSA and the USDOT;to develop an understanding on how new safety features/functions should work. v CAMP,created by GM and Ford in 1995 has worked to resolve the key pre-competitive issuesneeded for deployment of these new safety features. OEMs will take these learnings todevelop executions consistent with their brands and vehicle/interior architectures. Also, theIntegrated Vehicle-Based Safety Systems (IVBSS), the five-year cooperative researchproject, combined several DAS features/functions (forward collision, lane departure, lanechange, and curve speed warning) into an integrated system.The concern for ease and simple to use applies to safety and connectivity features/functionsalike. The key question is how well do safety features work, the class of features that interactdirectly with the driver through the senses and rely on the driver to take action. Do these newsafety have “value”, in the sense of reducing accidents with out negative consequences?Relative to HMI development we ask a different set of questions, how effective is the “alert”that is being understood and appropriately acted on. In the case of infotainment features,that we use everyday of an entertainment (Pandora) and information (navigation with traffic)related, distraction is the key issue.As mentioned, designing safe treatedfeatures/functions has a very different setof considerations. The use of vehiclesimulators has significantly increased theunderstanding of alerts and warnings,because realistic driving scenarios can becreated to measure response withoutputting anyone at risk. Ford, Toyota, GM,and other OEMs and suppliers havevehicle simulators and have used them totest possible warning solutions. Many ofthese experiments have been done incollaboration with NHTSA, specificallywith CAMP. The naturalistic studiesfocused on front collision, blind spot, lanechange, curve speed, and backup-warning systems. The systems that madeuse of instrument cluster based displays,heads-up displays, haptic seats, and avariety of audible warnings. Resultsshowed that the most effective solutionsuse warnings that appropriately communicate urgency and combine sensory alerts.Basically, haptic warnings must be intuitively related to event, visual warnings must be clearlyseen without having to look down, and the audible warnings must be of a frequency that isclearly heard by people of all ages.  Dave  McNamara  -­‐  Autotechinsder  LLC     6   November  8,  2010  
  7. 7. The Advanced User Interface – Essential for the Safe and Connected Car AutoTechinsider LLC White Paper November 2010  To make these warning systems truly useful for protecting people and saving lives, thesystem that detects the problem condition (and generates a warning) must have a highdegree of accuracy, and must not generate false positives. If drivers lose confidence inwarning systems, they will disregard the warning and render it useless. Basically, theaccuracy and dependability of the detection system is as important as the effectiveness ofthe warning itself. CAMP has identified these criteria for designing displays, the combinationof visual and auditory alerts: vi 1. get attention (auditory best) 2. convey urgency (auditory best) 3. be annoying (combination) 4. be understandable (visual best) 5. be effective at indicating where the collision is (visual best) 6. be effective about what to do (visual best) 7. overall utility.viiThe OEMs surveyed all have formal design processes that are an intimate part of theiroverall vehicle design process. This implies that design guidelines must be met and verifiedbefore proceeding. Several tier ones also have a formal process around capturing customerand technology trends and verifying requirements. Some of those surveyed indicated thatthey are currently creating a disciplined HMI process. Regardless of whether the OEM directsand specifies all or some of the HMI development process, these are the critical successfactors:  Human factors: professionals who are knowledgeable and experienced  Strong internal design guidelines  Continuous benchmarking of the competition  Participation in key consortiums  Generic usability or naturalistic studies to understand driver behavior  A formal software development process: involving requirements capture  On-going product improvement through social networks: including customer and developer involvementDave  McNamara  -­‐  Autotechinsder  LLC     7   November  8,  2010  
  8. 8. The Advanced User Interface – Essential for the Safe and Connected Car AutoTechinsider LLC White Paper November 2010  It is important to identify the tier two suppliers who are focused on providing platforms andtool sets for developing advanced UIs. The three that were often mentioned in our interviewswere Altia, Elektrobit, and MECEL who are revolutionizing UI design, providing software toolsand collaborative approaches. To help us visualize the process, the graphic below outlines ageneric process for creating an infotainment system with a touch screen. The starting pointsfor this process are well thought-out use cases.Dave  McNamara  -­‐  Autotechinsder  LLC     8   November  8,  2010  
  9. 9. The Advanced User Interface – Essential for the Safe and Connected Car AutoTechinsider LLC White Paper November 2010  Advanced UIs – The Future Safe and Connected CarWe asked the experts (in our interviews and on-line survey) who are the current leaders,what technologies and processes do they employ (previously discussed) and what will thefuture UI look like (with 2015 in view). You will have to read the full 100-page report becauseof the brevity of this article, but here are selected findings:  The multi-modal UI as represented by the Audi A8 received high marks. Multi-modal means the use of large displays, easy to reach controls/steering wheel controls supplemented by voice.  The use of large panel displays in the cluster and center stack, especially. Haptics will largely be a luxury vehicle application, as will be OLEDs. As one expert said, “It’s all about getting larger, more capable displays in the cars.” According to another expert, “Affordability is the issue relative to application.” Volume application, expected around 2015 is needed in HUDs and large cluster LCDs before wide adoption in mid-range and smaller cars. The 2010 Range Rover with the 12inch LCD and the Lexus with the use of super bright OLEDs are showing us the future.Dave  McNamara  -­‐  Autotechinsder  LLC     9   November  8,  2010  
  10. 10. The Advanced User Interface – Essential for the Safe and Connected Car AutoTechinsider LLC White Paper November 2010   Lexus OLED for Navigation Display 2010 Range Rover LCD Display ClusterDave  McNamara  -­‐  Autotechinsder  LLC     10   November  8,  2010  
  11. 11. The Advanced User Interface – Essential for the Safe and Connected Car AutoTechinsider LLC White Paper November 2010    Haptics as represented by the new BMW 5-series has arrived and significantly improved i-Drive such that it received a best-in-class rating. Also, surprisingly many think haptics will relegate voice recognition to complex data entry tasks (e.g. Music search implemented in Ford SYNC).  OEMs such as Mercedes are showing publically implementations of new collision warning features see below. Challenges remain on how these new functions associated with curve speed warning and intersection safety will be integrated in the car. For this reason, the USDOT proposed a safety pilot of 1000 or so vehicles in the 2011-2012 time frame, as well as continuing CAMP’s work.viii  Surprising the resurgence of HUDs is expected, as several experts indicated that HUDs are now affordable and more importantly packageable. HUDs are a new display surface, a way to get important information into the car! Our report forecasted significant growth in HUD applications in the 2013-2015 tine frameDave  McNamara  -­‐  Autotechinsder  LLC     11   November  8,  2010  
  12. 12. The Advanced User Interface – Essential for the Safe and Connected Car AutoTechinsider LLC White Paper November 2010  The year 2015 will be an important one for the auto industry and for the advancement of theauto UI. The U.S. auto industry is expected to have restructured and largely recovered by2015, returning to the 1976–2020 trend line of about 16 million vehicles sold per yearix. Thevehicle of 2015 will be safe and connected, built on open, green, and energy-efficientplatforms. We think the new technological trends include:• Significant penetration of DAS features augmented by IntelliDrive SM features, cooperative driving systems introduced• Connected car technologies will be available on all vehicle types, including mid-range and lower-end vehicles, with UIs designed to be safe, affordable, easy to use, and aligned with brand identity.• Best-practice HMI development process and associated tool sets adopted• The strongest brands and suppliers will be the winners. They are best placed to respond to customer demands and have already adopted advanced UIsDave  McNamara  -­‐  Autotechinsder  LLC     12   November  8,  2010  
  13. 13. The Advanced User Interface – Essential for the Safe and Connected Car AutoTechinsider LLC White Paper November 2010  In conclusion, below are two contrasting views of the advanced UI or cockpit of the 2015vehicle. The windscreen display is “over-the-top” but recognizes the need for a new displaysurface. We agree expanded but a more judicious use of HUDs. The graphic on the nextpage is what we summarized from what the experts told us, the “multi-modal” UI. Wired Magazine – the windshield is the displayDave  McNamara  -­‐  Autotechinsder  LLC     13   November  8,  2010  
  14. 14. The Advanced User Interface – Essential for the Safe and Connected Car AutoTechinsider LLC White Paper November 2010  The 2105 Advanced UI Adoption of the advance UI will be steady and will require significant “value engineering” to achieve the right performance with quality and affordability. We expect governments to encourage and accelerate deployment through regulatory actions. For example in the US we expect NHTSA to use New Car Assessment Program (NCAP) to encourage OEMs to build safer vehicles and consumers to buy them. Important to the development of new active safety products, NHTSA has added new rating categories to NCAP. The current focus on “crash worthiness” testing to change to “crash avoidance” testing. Dave  McNamara  -­‐  Autotechinsder  LLC     14   November  8,  2010  
  15. 15. The Advanced User Interface – Essential for the Safe and Connected Car AutoTechinsider LLC White Paper November 2010  The HMI is indeed strategic as we enter the “best of times”, as our cars become safer andconnected. We just need to design easy to use and effective UIs to accommodate morefeatures/functions and at the same time deal with driver distraction. Fortunately, our former“old-school” auto industry is up to these challenges. The unfortunate alternative is de-contenting, what the driving public doesn’t want!!                                                                                                                          Frost  and  Sullivan  2008  market  reports  iii  http://www.intellidriveusa.org/library/videos/ica.php  iii  2009  New  York  Auto  Show:  Volvo  XC60  with  City  Safety  forerunner  of  Platooning  iv  http://www.telematicsupdate.com/human-­‐machine-­‐interface-­‐report/index.html  v  VEHICLE  SAFETY  COMMUNICATIONS  IN  THE  UNITED  STATES,  Michael  Shulman  Ford  Motor  Company  United  States  Richard  Deering  General  Motors  Corporation  United  States  Paper  Number  07-­‐0010  vi  NHTSA  –  CAMP  Annual  Report  vii  http://www.nhtsa.gov/people/injury/research/pub/acas/Ch3-­‐10.htm  viii  The  USDOT  has  recently  announced  that  a  site  will  be  chosen  to  launch  this  ―safety  pilotǁ‖  of  V2V  safety  applications,  thousand  of  vehicles  will  be  involved  •  the  pilot  goals  presented  at  a  recent  USDOT  workshop  were  to  support  the  2013  Regulatory  V2V  Decision  with  field  data  and  drive  public  awareness  &  acceptance.  •  Expect  this  project  to  be  a  launched  in  2011  running  through  2012  as  a  key  input  to  federal  rulemaking.    According  to  the  Center  for  Automotive  Research  ixDave  McNamara  -­‐  Autotechinsder  LLC     15   November  8,  2010  

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