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  • 1. Age of Exploration “Europeans Set Sail” Week 1 1
  • 2. Immersion Check • Have I acknowledged the source for the information I have written down? • How do I know if the information I have written down goes with a key term or a main idea? • What terms and main ideas do I still need to gather more research on? 2
  • 3. Key Terms • Prince Henry the Navigator • Christopher Columbus • Vasco da Gama • caravel • astrolabe • cartography 3
  • 4. Main Ideas 1.What was the Age of Exploration? What reasons did European nations have for wanting to explore new worlds? 2. Why did European leaders and explorers want to find a sailing trade route to Asia instead of continuing to use the overland trade route? 3.Identify Prince Henry and explain his significance to the events of the world at his time. 4.What technological inventions and improvements promoted the Age of Exploration? 5.Identify Christopher Columbus and explain his significance to the events of the world at his time 4
  • 5. Main Idea #1 5
  • 6. Main Idea #1 • How would you define the Age of Exploration? 5
  • 7. Main Idea #1 • How would you define the Age of Exploration? • What reasons did European nations have for wanting to explore new worlds? 5
  • 8. Age of Exploration Reasons • Gain economic wealth • Spread the Christian Religion • Intellectual Curiosity 6
  • 9. Main Idea #2 • Why did European leaders and explorers want to find a sailing trade route to Asia instead of continuing to use the overland trade route? 7
  • 10. 8
  • 11. SPICES 8
  • 12. SPICES In the 1400s, there was no refrigeration. To prevent meat from spoiling, people would drown their meat in salt to preserve and dry it (like beef jerky). They also used a lot of spices like pepper to cover up the taste of the salted or spoiled meat. 8
  • 13. SPICES In the 1400s, there was no refrigeration. To prevent meat from spoiling, people would drown their meat in salt to preserve and dry it (like beef jerky). They also used a lot of spices like pepper to cover up the taste of the salted or spoiled meat. Ancient Romans used to pay $125 for 12 ounces of pepper. The pepper in your local supermarket would have paid for a year's rent. 8
  • 14. Main Idea #3 & #4 9
  • 15. Main Idea #3 & #4 • Identify Prince Henry and explain his significance to the events of the world at his time. 9
  • 16. Main Idea #3 & #4 • Identify Prince Henry and explain his significance to the events of the world at his time. • What technological inventions and improvements promoted the Age of Exploration? 9
  • 17. 10
  • 18. Caravel 10
  • 19. Vasco da Gama 11
  • 20. Main Idea #5 12
  • 21. Main Idea #5 • Identify Christopher Columbus and explain his significance to the events of the world at his time. 12
  • 22. La Pinta La Nina Santa Maria 13
  • 23. Establishing the Southern Colonies 14
  • 24. Key Terms • In your group, discuss the key terms of Week 2. Confirm the definitions you have written, the sources, and add information as needed. 15
  • 25. Success & Failures • Divide the large piece of paper in half. • Go through your notes and write down the factors that contributed to the success of early settlers establishing a permanent settlement. • Go through your notes and write down the factors that contributed to the failures of settlers in establishing a colony. 16
  • 26. • What lessons need to be learned from the early settlers attempts that can help us in space. (REWRITE THIS) 17
  • 27. Week 2 Seminar The Southern Colonies Main Ideas 18
  • 28. Main Idea #1 19
  • 29. Main Idea #1 • What is a joint-stock company? 19
  • 30. Main Idea #1 • What is a joint-stock company? 19
  • 31. Main Idea #1 • What is a joint-stock company? • What did the owners of the Virginia Company of London hope to achieve by financing the creation of a permanent settlement in Virginia? 19
  • 32. - Charter - a document, issued by a sovereign or state, outlining the conditions under which a corporation, colony, city, or other corporate body is organized, and defining its rights and privileges. 20
  • 33. Main Idea #2 • Identify the factors that contributed to the success/ failure of early colonial settlements in the New World. 21
  • 34. 22
  • 35. 22
  • 36. 22
  • 37. 22
  • 38. 22
  • 39. 22
  • 40. 22
  • 41. 22
  • 42. 22
  • 43. 22
  • 44. Main Idea #3 23
  • 45. Main Idea #3 • Compare and contrast each of the Southern colonies political, economic, religious, and social situations. 23
  • 46. •South Carolina •Virginia(Jamestown) •Maryland •North Carolina •Georgia (Savannah) 24
  • 47. Main Idea #4 25
  • 48. Main Idea #4 • What caused Southern colonists to favor slaves over indentured servants? 25
  • 49. Main Idea #4 • What caused Southern colonists to favor slaves over indentured servants? • What allowed Africans to become slaves rather than indentured servants? 25
  • 50. Main Idea #4 • What caused Southern colonists to favor slaves over indentured servants? • What allowed Africans to become slaves rather than indentured servants? • How did Southern Colonists maintain control over their slaves? 25
  • 51. Indentured Servants 26
  • 52. Indentured Servants • Both white and black indentured servants lived, worked, & had families together. • 100,000 out of 130,000 people in Virginia were indentured servants 26
  • 53. Indentured Servants 27
  • 54. Indentured Servants • Contracted workers (4 -7 years) purchased by rich aristocrats who agreed to pay off their debt. • Master fed, clothed, & housed the servant. • Servant received money, tools, & rights to a few acres of land at the end of their contract. 27
  • 55. Indentured Servants 28
  • 56. Indentured Servants • Problems - Leave after a few years, not used to heavy farming or hot weather. 28
  • 57. Indentured Servants • Problems - Leave after a few years, not used to heavy farming or hot weather. • England’s economy improves in the late half of the 17th century. Fewer indentured servants for hire. 28
  • 58. Rise of Slavery • Strong, in-expensive, no government protection, black skin keeps them from blending in with the rest of the crowd, permanent workers. • Black skin became synonymous with being a slave. 29
  • 59. Establishing White Supremacy “How could the ruling class break the bonds between the white and black servant class? How could the nobles enslave one race - the blacks - forever?” -- Slavery and Miscegenation[inter-racial marriage] in America by: Linda Allen Bryant 30
  • 60. Carolina Slave Codes “Carolina authorities developed laws to keep the African American population under control. Whipping, branding, dismembering, castrating, or killing a slave were legal under many circumstances. Freedom of movement, to assemble at a funeral, to earn money, even to learn to read and write, became outlawed.” --http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part1/1narr5.html A Negro Hung Alive by the Ribs to a Gallows 31
  • 61. 32
  • 62. Triangular Trade Route Triangular Trade Route - fueled the growth of slavery in the Americas. • Slave traders brought Africans to the Americas • Rum and sugar cane from the Americas went to Europe • Sales of these products provided money to European slave traders to capture and transport more Africans to the Americas. [Engaging Students in American History] 33
  • 63. 34
  • 64. 35
  • 65. 36
  • 66. 37
  • 67. 38
  • 68. Week 3 Seminar The New England Colonies Main Ideas 39
  • 69. Main Idea #1 40
  • 70. Main Idea #1 What factors led to the development of slavery in the colonies? 40
  • 71. Main Idea #1 What factors led to the development of slavery in the colonies? - Lack of indentured servants 40
  • 72. Main Idea #1 What factors led to the development of slavery in the colonies? - Lack of indentured servants - Europe’s improving economy after 1650 40
  • 73. Main Idea #1 What factors led to the development of slavery in the colonies? - Lack of indentured servants - Europe’s improving economy after 1650 - Easy availability of slaves 40
  • 74. Main Idea #1 What factors led to the development of slavery in the colonies? - Lack of indentured servants - Europe’s improving economy after 1650 - Easy availability of slaves - Advantages of Blacks over Whites 40
  • 75. Main Idea #1 What factors led to the development of slavery in the colonies? - Lack of indentured servants - Europe’s improving economy after 1650 - Easy availability of slaves - Advantages of Blacks over Whites - Church and slave codes 40
  • 76. Main Idea #1 What factors led to the development of slavery in the colonies? - Lack of indentured servants - Europe’s improving economy after 1650 - Easy availability of slaves - Advantages of Blacks over Whites - Church and slave codes Reference: Slaves vs Indentured Servants PDF 40
  • 77. 41
  • 78. Main Idea #2 Describe the conditions and common practices aboard a typical slave ship bound for the middle passage? 41
  • 79. Main Idea #2 Describe the conditions and common practices aboard a typical slave ship bound for the middle passage? 41
  • 80. Main Idea #2 Describe the conditions and common practices aboard a typical slave ship bound for the middle passage? How much better or worse was the voyage to America for those coming as indentured servants? 41
  • 81. 42
  • 82. 43
  • 83. Main Idea #3 44
  • 84. Main Idea #3 Explain the role religion played in the establishment of the New England colonies and in daily colonial life. 44
  • 85. Main Idea #3 Explain the role religion played in the establishment of the New England colonies and in daily colonial life. 44
  • 86. Main Idea #3 Explain the role religion played in the establishment of the New England colonies and in daily colonial life. - The reason many people came to the New England colonies was to escape religious persecution. 44
  • 87. Main Idea #3 Explain the role religion played in the establishment of the New England colonies and in daily colonial life. - The reason many people came to the New England colonies was to escape religious persecution. 44
  • 88. Main Idea #3 Explain the role religion played in the establishment of the New England colonies and in daily colonial life. - The reason many people came to the New England colonies was to escape religious persecution. - Politics and religion were closely linked in Puritan New England. 44
  • 89. Main Idea #3 Explain the role religion played in the establishment of the New England colonies and in daily colonial life. - The reason many people came to the New England colonies was to escape religious persecution. - Politics and religion were closely linked in Puritan New England. 44
  • 90. Main Idea #3 Explain the role religion played in the establishment of the New England colonies and in daily colonial life. - The reason many people came to the New England colonies was to escape religious persecution. - Politics and religion were closely linked in Puritan New England. - Colonists only became full members by passing a public faith test. 44
  • 91. Main Idea #3 Explain the role religion played in the establishment of the New England colonies and in daily colonial life. - The reason many people came to the New England colonies was to escape religious persecution. - Politics and religion were closely linked in Puritan New England. - Colonists only became full members by passing a public faith test. 44
  • 92. Main Idea #3 Explain the role religion played in the establishment of the New England colonies and in daily colonial life. - The reason many people came to the New England colonies was to escape religious persecution. - Politics and religion were closely linked in Puritan New England. - Colonists only became full members by passing a public faith test. 44
  • 93. Main Idea #3 Explain the role religion played in the establishment of the New England colonies and in daily colonial life. - The reason many people came to the New England colonies was to escape religious persecution. - Politics and religion were closely linked in Puritan New England. - Colonists only became full members by passing a public faith test. Reference: Holt Chp.3/Sec.2 PDF 44
  • 94. Mayflower Compact 45
  • 95. Mayflower Compact Settlers consented to follow the rules & regulations of the gov’t for the sake of survival. 45
  • 96. Mayflower Compact Settlers consented to follow the rules & regulations of the gov’t for the sake of survival. 45
  • 97. Mayflower Compact Settlers consented to follow the rules & regulations of the gov’t for the sake of survival. Gov’t gets its power from the people it is governing. 45
  • 98. Mayflower Compact Settlers consented to follow the rules & regulations of the gov’t for the sake of survival. Gov’t gets its power from the people it is governing. 45
  • 99. Mayflower Compact Settlers consented to follow the rules & regulations of the gov’t for the sake of survival. Gov’t gets its power from the people it is governing. Foundation of the United States Constitution 45
  • 100. General Court 46
  • 101. Main Idea #4 47
  • 102. Main Idea #4 Compare and contrast the political, economic, and social situation of the New England colonies to that of the Southern colonies. What similarities and differences exist? 47
  • 103. Main Idea #4 Compare and contrast the political, economic, and social situation of the New England colonies to that of the Southern colonies. What similarities and differences exist? 47
  • 104. Main Idea #4 Compare and contrast the political, economic, and social situation of the New England colonies to that of the Southern colonies. What similarities and differences exist? • How do the reasons for colonial settlement in the New England colonies compare to the reasons for colonial settlement in the Southern colonies? 47
  • 105. Main Idea #4 Compare and contrast the political, economic, and social situation of the New England colonies to that of the Southern colonies. What similarities and differences exist? • How do the reasons for colonial settlement in the New England colonies compare to the reasons for colonial settlement in the Southern colonies? • Did the first colonists in New England suffer hardships and conflicts similar to those suffered by the people at Jamestown? 47
  • 106. Main Idea #4 Compare and contrast the political, economic, and social situation of the New England colonies to that of the Southern colonies. What similarities and differences exist? • How do the reasons for colonial settlement in the New England colonies compare to the reasons for colonial settlement in the Southern colonies? • Did the first colonists in New England suffer hardships and conflicts similar to those suffered by the people at Jamestown? • Who were the key members and leaders of the New England communities? Do they share any similarities to John Smith or James Oglethorpe? 47
  • 107. Main Idea #4 Compare and contrast the political, economic, and social situation of the New England colonies to that of the Southern colonies. What similarities and differences exist? • How do the reasons for colonial settlement in the New England colonies compare to the reasons for colonial settlement in the Southern colonies? • Did the first colonists in New England suffer hardships and conflicts similar to those suffered by the people at Jamestown? • Who were the key members and leaders of the New England communities? Do they share any similarities to John Smith or James Oglethorpe? • How does New England’s colonial economic system compare to the Southern colonial economic system? 47
  • 108. Compare & Contrast 48
  • 109. Compare & Contrast • Pilgrims struggled through the first winter. 48
  • 110. Compare & Contrast • Pilgrims struggled through the first winter. • Dependent on local natives to survive (Squanto) 48
  • 111. Compare & Contrast • Pilgrims struggled through the first winter. • Dependent on local natives to survive (Squanto) • Pilgrims made little $, but were a strong community. 48
  • 112. Compare & Contrast • Pilgrims struggled through the first winter. • Dependent on local natives to survive (Squanto) • Pilgrims made little $, but were a strong community. • Women had the right to sign contracts & own land. 48
  • 113. Compare & Contrast • • Pilgrims struggled Massachusetts Bay through the first winter. Company finances Puritan trip. • Dependent on local natives to survive (Squanto) • Pilgrims made little $, but were a strong community. • Women had the right to sign contracts & own land. 48
  • 114. Compare & Contrast • • Pilgrims struggled Massachusetts Bay through the first winter. Company finances Puritan trip. • Dependent on local • natives to survive Puritans came well (Squanto) prepared & faced little resistance from local • American Indians. Pilgrims made little $, but were a strong community. • Women had the right to sign contracts & own land. 48
  • 115. Compare & Contrast • • Pilgrims struggled Massachusetts Bay through the first winter. Company finances Puritan trip. • Dependent on local • natives to survive Puritans came well (Squanto) prepared & faced little resistance from local • American Indians. Pilgrims made little $, but were a strong community. • Healthful climate • Women had the right to sign contracts & own land. 48
  • 116. Compare & Contrast • • Pilgrims struggled Massachusetts Bay through the first winter. Company finances Puritan trip. • Dependent on local • natives to survive Puritans came well (Squanto) prepared & faced little resistance from local • American Indians. Pilgrims made little $, but were a strong community. • Healthful climate • Women had the right to • sign contracts & own Bad soil, furs, fish, land. shipbuilding 48
  • 117. Compare & Contrast 49
  • 118. Compare & Contrast • Apprentices 49
  • 119. Compare & Contrast • Apprentices • Male church members are the only ones who could vote. 49
  • 120. Compare & Contrast • Apprentices • Male church members are the only ones who could vote. • Schools to be founded in every township of 50 families. 49
  • 121. Compare & Contrast • Apprentices • Male church members are the only ones who could vote. • Schools to be founded in every township of 50 families. • William Bradford & John Winthrop 49
  • 122. Compare & Contrast • • Apprentices Mayflower Compact & the General Court • Male church members are the only ones who could vote. • Schools to be founded in every township of 50 families. • William Bradford & John Winthrop 49
  • 123. John Winthrop 1st Governor of Massachusetts “We shall be a city set on a hill.” A holy city that would be a model for the world. Harmonious and selfless Christian community. Reference: Massachusetts Bay Colony Video 50
  • 124. William Bradford John Smith like? http://www.smithsonianeducation.org/migrations/portrait/bradford.jpg 51
  • 125. William Bradford John Smith like? • Established a rationing system. • Implemented fishing, trade, and agricultural programs. • Negotiated peaceful relations with Narragansett Indians • Kept the colony financially supported Reference: ABC-CLIO, “William Bradford” http://www.smithsonianeducation.org/migrations/portrait/bradford.jpg 51
  • 126. Squanto http://www.mccarterfamily.com/mccarterpage/stories/stephen_hop 52
  • 127. Puritan Life The life of the colony and of its people, the clothes they should wear, the length of their hair, their labors and pastimes, were all supervised and regulated in accordance with the clergy's interpretation of the scriptures. Reference: Pilgrims and Puritans, Part II. 10 September 2007 <http://brownellfamily.rootsweb.com/ Pilgrims2.html>. 53
  • 128. Puritan Life Because Christmas, New Years and other holidays were holy days in the Catholic Church, their observance was prohibited. Since the ministers said that they could find no authority in the Bible for church weddings or church funerals, marriages were performed by civil magistrates, and the dead were buried with a sermon, a song or a prayer. Reference: Pilgrims and Puritans, Part II. 10 September 2007 <http://brownellfamily.rootsweb.com/ Pilgrims2.html>. 54
  • 129. Week 4 Puritan Dissenters 55
  • 130. Puritan Life •Membership restricted to those who could present evidence that they had experienced “saving grace.” •Predestination - God had chosen who was saved and who was damned. •Purge [get rid of] every remnant of the Roman Catholic Church ritual and practice. •Believe that gov’t should strictly enforce public morality. •Individual is expected to conform to the beliefs and practices of the community as defined by the elders. Reference: Puritan Life Video 56
  • 131. 57
  • 132. Roger Williams “The Puritans' Massachusetts Bay royal charter [is] invalid because the king [can] not give away land that belonged to the Indians without their consent. [Roger Williams] compounded his unpopularity by writing a letter to King Charles I accusing him of being an ally of the Devil.” Reference: American History: Roger Williams. 13 September 2007 <http:// www.americanhistory.abc-clio.com/library/searches/ >. 58
  • 133. Roger Williams 59
  • 134. Roger Williams - Established the colony of Rhode Island in 1644 59
  • 135. Roger Williams - Established the colony of Rhode Island in 1644 59
  • 136. Roger Williams - Established the colony of Rhode Island in 1644 i. Gov’t based on the consent of the people 59
  • 137. Roger Williams - Established the colony of Rhode Island in 1644 i. Gov’t based on the consent of the people 59
  • 138. Roger Williams - Established the colony of Rhode Island in 1644 i. Gov’t based on the consent of the people ii. Religious tolerance for all community members 59
  • 139. Roger Williams - Established the colony of Rhode Island in 1644 i. Gov’t based on the consent of the people ii. Religious tolerance for all community members 59
  • 140. Roger Williams - Established the colony of Rhode Island in 1644 i. Gov’t based on the consent of the people ii. Religious tolerance for all community members iii. Separate church & state 59
  • 141. Roger Williams - Established the colony of Rhode Island in 1644 i. Gov’t based on the consent of the people ii. Religious tolerance for all community members iii. Separate church & state 59
  • 142. Roger Williams - Established the colony of Rhode Island in 1644 i. Gov’t based on the consent of the people ii. Religious tolerance for all community members iii. Separate church & state iv. Respect Native Americans 59
  • 143. Roger Williams - Established the colony of Rhode Island in 1644 i. Gov’t based on the consent of the people ii. Religious tolerance for all community members iii. Separate church & state iv. Respect Native Americans 59
  • 144. Roger Williams - Established the colony of Rhode Island in 1644 i. Gov’t based on the consent of the people ii. Religious tolerance for all community members iii. Separate church & state iv. Respect Native Americans Source: 59
  • 145. Roger Williams - Established the colony of Rhode Island in 1644 i. Gov’t based on the consent of the people ii. Religious tolerance for all community members iii. Separate church & state iv. Respect Native Americans Source: [Puritan Dissenters Video] 59
  • 146. Roger Williams - Established the colony of Rhode Island in 1644 i. Gov’t based on the consent of the people ii. Religious tolerance for all community members iii. Separate church & state iv. Respect Native Americans Source: [Puritan Dissenters Video] 59
  • 147. 60
  • 148. 61
  • 149. Anne Hutchinson “People [can] be saved by complete faith in God, [your] faith [is] more important than [your] actions.” Reference: American History: Settling for Determinism. 13 September 2007 <http:// www.americanhistory.abc-clio.com/lessons/topics/topicdisplay.aspx >. 62
  • 150. “God’s universal law gave to man despotic [tyrant] power over his female in due awe.” -- John Milton 63
  • 151. Anne Hutchinson 64
  • 152. Anne Hutchinson - Established the Portsmouth settlement in Rhode Island 64
  • 153. Anne Hutchinson - Established the Portsmouth settlement in Rhode Island 64
  • 154. Anne Hutchinson - Established the Portsmouth settlement in Rhode Island i. One’s salvation was located within oneself, not the church. 64
  • 155. Anne Hutchinson - Established the Portsmouth settlement in Rhode Island i. One’s salvation was located within oneself, not the church. 64
  • 156. Anne Hutchinson - Established the Portsmouth settlement in Rhode Island i. One’s salvation was located within oneself, not the church. ii. One does not need the guidance of a church or its ministers. 64
  • 157. Anne Hutchinson - Established the Portsmouth settlement in Rhode Island i. One’s salvation was located within oneself, not the church. ii. One does not need the guidance of a church or its ministers. 64
  • 158. Anne Hutchinson - Established the Portsmouth settlement in Rhode Island i. One’s salvation was located within oneself, not the church. ii. One does not need the guidance of a church or its ministers. Source: 64
  • 159. Anne Hutchinson - Established the Portsmouth settlement in Rhode Island i. One’s salvation was located within oneself, not the church. ii. One does not need the guidance of a church or its ministers. Source: [Puritan Dissenters Video] 64
  • 160. Anne Hutchinson - Established the Portsmouth settlement in Rhode Island i. One’s salvation was located within oneself, not the church. ii. One does not need the guidance of a church or its ministers. Source: [Puritan Dissenters Video] 64
  • 161. 65
  • 162. Thomas Hooker quot;The foundation of all authority is laid . . . in the free consent of the people. . . .” “It is in their power, also, to set the bounds and limitations of the power and place unto which they call [their appointed government officials].quot; Father of American Democracy? 66
  • 163. Thomas Hooker 67
  • 164. Thomas Hooker - Founded the Connecticut settlement in 1635 67
  • 165. Thomas Hooker - Founded the Connecticut settlement in 1635 67
  • 166. Thomas Hooker - Founded the Connecticut settlement in 1635 i. Drafted the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut 67
  • 167. Thomas Hooker - Founded the Connecticut settlement in 1635 i. Drafted the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut - Allowed non-church members to vote 67
  • 168. Thomas Hooker - Founded the Connecticut settlement in 1635 i. Drafted the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut - Allowed non-church members to vote - Outlined the powers of the general courts. 67
  • 169. Thomas Hooker - Founded the Connecticut settlement in 1635 i. Drafted the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut - Allowed non-church members to vote - Outlined the powers of the general courts. 67
  • 170. Thomas Hooker - Founded the Connecticut settlement in 1635 i. Drafted the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut - Allowed non-church members to vote - Outlined the powers of the general courts. Source: 67
  • 171. Thomas Hooker - Founded the Connecticut settlement in 1635 i. Drafted the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut - Allowed non-church members to vote - Outlined the powers of the general courts. Source: [Puritan Dissenters Video] 67
  • 172. Thomas Hooker - Founded the Connecticut settlement in 1635 i. Drafted the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut - Allowed non-church members to vote - Outlined the powers of the general courts. Source: [Puritan Dissenters Video] 67
  • 173. 68
  • 174. The Middle Colonies New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, & Delaware 69
  • 175. 70
  • 176. 71
  • 177. New Netherlands 1613 72
  • 178. 73
  • 179. William Penn Quakers a.k.a. The Society of Friends 74
  • 180. William Penn Quakers a.k.a. The Society of Friends Reasons for coming? Problems Native Americans Religion Economy 74
  • 181. 75
  • 182. Quakers a.k.a. “Society of Friends” 76
  • 183. Quakers a.k.a. “Society of Friends” Everyone can have a direct relationship with God. 76
  • 184. Quakers a.k.a. “Society of Friends” Everyone can have a direct relationship with God. • No need for a priest, a minister, or to follow religious practices 76
  • 185. Quakers a.k.a. “Society of Friends” Everyone can have a direct relationship with God. • No need for a priest, a minister, or to follow religious practices • Refuse to believe in pre-destination 76
  • 186. Quakers a.k.a. “Society of Friends” Everyone can have a direct relationship with God. • No need for a priest, a minister, or to follow religious practices • Refuse to believe in pre-destination • Refused to pay taxes to the Church of England or bow down to any person of authority 76
  • 187. Quakers a.k.a. “Society of Friends” Everyone can have a direct relationship with God. • No need for a priest, a minister, or to follow religious practices • Refuse to believe in pre-destination • Refused to pay taxes to the Church of England or bow down to any person of authority [New York & New Jersey Video] 76
  • 188. Quakers a.k.a. “Society of Friends” 77
  • 189. Quakers a.k.a. “Society of Friends” • Dressed plainly 77
  • 190. Quakers a.k.a. “Society of Friends” • Dressed plainly • Believed in the equality of men & women before God and religious tolerance 77
  • 191. Quakers a.k.a. “Society of Friends” • Dressed plainly • Believed in the equality of men & women before God and religious tolerance • Pacifists (do not believe in war) 77
  • 192. Quakers a.k.a. “Society of Friends” • Dressed plainly • Believed in the equality of men & women before God and religious tolerance • Pacifists (do not believe in war) [Holt Chp.3/Sec.3 Middle Colonies.pdf] 77
  • 193. William Penn You worship God how you want, not how another person tells you. No law shall be made to the preference of any particular religious establishment. [Pennsylvania & Delaware Video] 78
  • 194. William Penn 79
  • 195. William Penn Established the colony of Pennsylvania 79
  • 196. William Penn Established the colony of Pennsylvania • Limited his own power and established a representative gov’t 79
  • 197. William Penn Established the colony of Pennsylvania • Limited his own power and established a representative gov’t • Promised religious freedom to all Christians 79
  • 198. William Penn Established the colony of Pennsylvania • Limited his own power and established a representative gov’t • Promised religious freedom to all Christians [Holt Chp.3/Sec.3 Middle Colonies.pdf] 79
  • 199. William Penn Established the colony of Pennsylvania • Limited his own power and established a representative gov’t • Promised religious freedom to all Christians [Holt Chp.3/Sec.3 Middle Colonies.pdf] 79
  • 200. Main Idea #1 How did William Penn attempt to create a colonial government that would be fair to all? 80
  • 201. Main Idea #1 How did William Penn attempt to create a colonial government that would be fair to all? First Frame of Gov’t - Constitution of Pennsylvania 80
  • 202. Main Idea #1 How did William Penn attempt to create a colonial government that would be fair to all? First Frame of Gov’t - Constitution of Pennsylvania • Unlimited free enterprise (private business) 80
  • 203. Main Idea #1 How did William Penn attempt to create a colonial government that would be fair to all? First Frame of Gov’t - Constitution of Pennsylvania • Unlimited free enterprise (private business) • Trial by jury 80
  • 204. Main Idea #1 How did William Penn attempt to create a colonial government that would be fair to all? First Frame of Gov’t - Constitution of Pennsylvania • Unlimited free enterprise (private business) • Trial by jury • Religious toleration 80
  • 205. Main Idea #1 How did William Penn attempt to create a colonial government that would be fair to all? First Frame of Gov’t - Constitution of Pennsylvania • Unlimited free enterprise (private business) • Trial by jury • Religious toleration • Secure private property 80
  • 206. Main Idea #1 How did William Penn attempt to create a colonial government that would be fair to all? First Frame of Gov’t - Constitution of Pennsylvania • Unlimited free enterprise (private business) • Trial by jury • Religious toleration • Secure private property • Respect Native Americans 80
  • 207. Main Idea #1 How did William Penn attempt to create a colonial government that would be fair to all? First Frame of Gov’t - Constitution of Pennsylvania • Unlimited free enterprise (private business) • Trial by jury • Religious toleration • Secure private property • Respect Native Americans • Amendments (changes to law) 80
  • 208. Main Idea #1 How did William Penn attempt to create a colonial government that would be fair to all? First Frame of Gov’t - Constitution of Pennsylvania • Unlimited free enterprise (private business) • Trial by jury • Religious toleration • Secure private property • Respect Native Americans • Amendments (changes to law) [ABC-CLIO - William Penn] 80
  • 209. Main Idea #1 How did William Penn attempt to create a colonial government that would be fair to all? First Frame of Gov’t - Constitution of Pennsylvania • Unlimited free enterprise (private business) • Trial by jury • Religious toleration • Secure private property • Respect Native Americans • Amendments (changes to law) [ABC-CLIO - William Penn] 80
  • 210. MAIN IDEA #2 What different types of jobs did slaves and women in the middle colonies hold? Slaves - Worked as skilled city laborers (blacksmiths & carpenters), as well as on farms and in the shipbuilding industry Women - Ran farms & businesses. Worked primarily as wives & nurses [Holt Chp.3/Sec.3 Middle Colonies.pdf] 81
  • 211. Main Idea #3 On what were the economies of the middle colonies based? How does that compare to the economies of the Southern and New England colonies? Middle colonies have a good climate and rich fertile land. • Staple crops - Crops that are always needed (wheat, barley, oats). “Breadbasket of the colonies” [Holt Chp.3/Sec.3 Middle Colonies.pdf] 82
  • 212. 83
  • 213. 84
  • 214. “You worship God how you want, not how another person tells you. No law shall be made to the preference of any particular religious establishment.” 84
  • 215. “You worship God how you want, “People [can] be saved by not how another person tells you. complete faith in God, [your] faith [is] more important than [your] No law shall be made to the actions.” preference of any particular religious establishment.” 84
  • 216. “You worship God how you want, “People [can] be saved by not how another person tells you. complete faith in God, [your] faith [is] more important than [your] No law shall be made to the actions.” preference of any particular religious establishment.” “A person’s salvation is located within oneself, not in the church.” 84
  • 217. “You worship God how you want, “People [can] be saved by not how another person tells you. complete faith in God, [your] faith [is] more important than [your] No law shall be made to the actions.” preference of any particular religious establishment.” “A person’s salvation is located within oneself, not in the church.” It shall be a crime to restrict the religious rights of those groups who believe in Jesus Christ. 84
  • 218. “You worship God how you want, “People [can] be saved by not how another person tells you. complete faith in God, [your] faith [is] more important than [your] No law shall be made to the actions.” preference of any particular religious establishment.” “A person’s salvation is located within oneself, not in the church.” It shall be a crime to restrict the religious rights of those groups who believe in Jesus Christ. “One does not need the guidance of a church or its ministers.” 84
  • 219. “You worship God how you want, “People [can] be saved by not how another person tells you. complete faith in God, [your] faith [is] more important than [your] No law shall be made to the actions.” preference of any particular religious establishment.” “A person’s salvation is located within oneself, not in the church.” It shall be a crime to restrict the religious All church and non- church members have rights of those the right to vote. groups who believe in Jesus Christ. “One does not need the guidance of a church or its ministers.” 84
  • 220. “You worship God how you want, “People [can] be saved by not how another person tells you. complete faith in God, [your] faith [is] more important than [your] No law shall be made to the actions.” preference of any particular religious establishment.” “A person’s salvation is located within oneself, not in the church.” “There must be a separation of church and state in the gov’t.” It shall be a crime to restrict the religious All church and non- church members have rights of those the right to vote. groups who believe in Jesus Christ. “One does not need the guidance of a church or its ministers.” 84
  • 221. 85
  • 222. “There must be a separation of church and state in the gov’t.” -- Roger Williams (Providence, Rhode Island) 85
  • 223. “We all agree to follow the rules & regulations of the gov’t for the sake of our survival.” -- Mayflower Compact “There must be a separation of church and state in the gov’t.” -- Roger Williams (Providence, Rhode Island) 85
  • 224. “We all agree to follow the rules & regulations of the gov’t for the sake of our survival.” -- Mayflower Compact Secure private property, “There must be a separation of church and unlimited free enterprise, trial state in the gov’t.” by jury, religious toleration, -- Roger Williams (Providence, Rhode Island) no mandatory military service. -- William Penn (Pennsylvania) First Frame of Gov’t 85
  • 225. “We all agree to follow the rules & regulations of the gov’t for the sake of our survival.” -- Mayflower Compact Secure private property, “There must be a separation of church and unlimited free enterprise, trial state in the gov’t.” by jury, religious toleration, -- Roger Williams (Providence, Rhode Island) no mandatory military service. “It is in their power, also, to set the bounds and limitations of the power and place unto which they call [their appointed government officials].quot; -- William Penn (Pennsylvania) First Frame of Gov’t -- Thomas Hooker (Connecticut) Fundamental Orders of Connecticut 85
  • 226. quot;The foundation of all authority is “We all agree to follow the rules & laid . . . in the free consent of the regulations of the gov’t for the sake of people. . . .” our survival.” -- Mayflower Compact -- Thomas Hooker (Connecticut) Secure private property, “There must be a separation of church and unlimited free enterprise, trial state in the gov’t.” by jury, religious toleration, -- Roger Williams (Providence, Rhode Island) no mandatory military service. “It is in their power, also, to set the bounds and limitations of the power and place unto which they call [their appointed government officials].quot; -- William Penn (Pennsylvania) First Frame of Gov’t -- Thomas Hooker (Connecticut) Fundamental Orders of Connecticut 85
  • 227. quot;The foundation of all authority is “We all agree to follow the rules & laid . . . in the free consent of the regulations of the gov’t for the sake of people. . . .” our survival.” -- Mayflower Compact -- Thomas Hooker (Connecticut) Secure private property, “There must be a separation of church and unlimited free enterprise, trial state in the gov’t.” by jury, religious toleration, -- Roger Williams (Providence, Rhode Island) no mandatory military service. “It is in their power, also, to set the bounds and limitations of the power and place unto which they call [their appointed government officials].quot; -- William Penn (Pennsylvania) First Frame of Gov’t -- Thomas Hooker (Connecticut) Fundamental Orders of Connecticut Gov’t shall be based on the consent of the people -- Roger Williams (Providence, Rhode Island) 85