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CNUNE Summit Jonathan Ford

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  • Old way, pipe & pond methodology
  • Page 3 – watershed planning underneath
  • Wolf in sheep’s clothing
  • Page 3 – watershed planning underneath
  • Not just residential impacts of disconnected, auto-dependent land use patterns
  • Greenwal-mart, mckinneytx
  • Greenwal-mart, mckinneytx
  • How create well loved areas that for so many reasons SG/NU principles advocateAND support watershed health
  • Runoff – Rate AND VolumeDoes not account for neighborhood/WATERSHED approach
  • Runoff – Rate AND VolumeWQZero sum game
  • Clear difference between TND & CSD
  • Growth patterns had more impact than BMPs (RI reductions: TSS=85%, TP=30%, TN=30%)
  • Farr sustainable urbanism SmartCode moduleThink about 2 ways – incentivize? Or ENABLE.
  • Instead of one-size fits all solutions that mar the landscape – design to context, integrate
  • Can view 2 ways: 1. compact development is good for watershed, therefore compactness may trump local-specific preservation2. Work around existing nature at neighborhood level even within compact note
  • Calibration for poor soilsShared solutions & stormwater bank language in ordinance
  • Same tools, same goals, reinterpret via CODES (impervious-density) and urban context
  • QUESTION: how do we implement these ideas in NE? What tools/mechanisms? Site by site & one size fits all vs. watershed/neighborhood/codes? Off site & shared solutions?What are YOU doing as a designer, planner, developer, URBANIST to move past LID and towards integration of NU & watershed health
  • Transcript

    • 1. morrisbeacon.comimplementing community vision
      Stormwater Urbanism:
      Going Beyond LID
      March 18, 2011
      Jonathan Ford, PE
      Morris Beacon Design, LLC
      Providence, RI
    • 2. Conventional Stormwater Management
      (peak rate mitigation banished to the backyard!)
    • 3. Low Impact Development (LID)!!
      • Reduce impervious cover
      • 4. Prevent impact to natural drainage systems
      • 5. Manage water as close to the source as possible
      • 6. Preserve natural areas, native vegetation, reduce impact on watershed
      • 7. Protect natural drainage pathways
      • 8. Utilize less complex, non-structural BMPs
      • 9. Create a multi-functional landscape
      - RI Design and Installation Standards Manual, 2010
    • 10.
    • 11.
    • 12.
    • 13.
    • 14. LID!!
      NH Stormwater Manual: Volume 1
    • 15. LID!!
      Rhode Island Stormwater Design and Installation Standards Manual, 2010
    • 16. LID!!
      VT Department of Environmental Conservation, LID webpage
    • 17. LID!!
      VT Department of Environmental Conservation, LID webpage
    • 18. LID!!
    • 19. LID!!
      Claytor, from Rhode Island Stormwater Design and Installation Standards Manual, 2010
    • 20.
    • 21. LID!!
    • 22. LID!!
    • 23. LID!!
      LEED!
    • 24.
    • 25.
    • 26.
    • 27.
    • 28.
    • 29.
    • 30. Stormwater Urbanism
      Not all impervious area is created equal
      Plan with the land
      Approximate nature
      Design to context
      Leave a simple solution behind
      see: www.morrisbeacon.com/blog
    • 31. Stormwater management: intro
      Falkenmark, Malin and Rockstrom, Johan. Balancing Water for Humans and Nature, p. 31-32. Earthscan, 2004.
    • 32. Stormwater management: intro
    • 33.
    • 34. Comparative
      infrastructure
      cost studies
      Material adapted from “Comparative Infrastructure & Material Analysis” under UPA Contract EP-W-05-25 and appears in the working publication “Smart Growth: The Business Opportunity for Developers and Production Builders” under the same contract.
      Original scenarios by Dover Kohl & Partners.
    • 35. Belle Hall: Infrastructure Cost per Residential Unit
      Material adapted from “Comparative Infrastructure & Material Analysis” under UPA Contract EP-W-05-25 and appears in the working publication “Smart Growth: The Business Opportunity for Developers and Production Builders” under the same contract.
      Original scenarios by Dover Kohl & Partners.
    • 36. Beyond LID: not all impervious area is created equal
    • 37. Beyond LID: not all impervious area is created equal
    • 38. Case study:
      Form-based code
      Project led by 180 Degrees Design Studio with Morris Beacon Design, Gould Evans, Fuss & O’Neill, Sustainable Settlements, LSL Planning, & Civitech.
    • 39. Case study: Form-based code
      Project led by 180 Degrees Design Studio with Morris Beacon Design, Gould Evans, Fuss & O’Neill, Sustainable Settlements, LSL Planning, & Civitech.
    • 40. Case study: Form-based code
      Project led by 180 Degrees Design Studio with Morris Beacon Design, Gould Evans, Fuss & O’Neill, Sustainable Settlements, LSL Planning, & Civitech.
    • 41. Case study: Form-based code
      Project led by 180 Degrees Design Studio with Morris Beacon Design, Gould Evans, Fuss & O’Neill, Sustainable Settlements, LSL Planning, & Civitech.
    • 42. Case study: Form-based code
      Project led by 180 Degrees Design Studio with Morris Beacon Design, Gould Evans, Fuss & O’Neill, Sustainable Settlements, LSL Planning, & Civitech.
    • 43. New England context?
      Not all impervious area is created equal
      Plan with the land
      Approximate nature
      Design to context
      Leave a simple solution behind
      see: www.morrisbeacon.com/blog
    • 44. Project led by 180 Degrees Design Studio with Morris Beacon Design, Gould Evans, Fuss & O’Neill, Sustainable Settlements, LSL Planning, & Civitech.
    • 45. Project led by 180 Degrees Design Studio with Morris Beacon Design, Gould Evans, Fuss & O’Neill, Sustainable Settlements, LSL Planning, & Civitech.
    • 46. Case study:
      Form-based code
      Project led by 180 Degrees Design Studio with Morris Beacon Design, Gould Evans, Fuss & O’Neill, Sustainable Settlements, LSL Planning, & Civitech.
    • 47. Design to context
      Project led by 180 Degrees Design Studio with Morris Beacon Design, Gould Evans, Fuss & O’Neill, Sustainable Settlements, LSL Planning, & Civitech.
    • 48. Design to context
      Project led by 180 Degrees Design Studio with Morris Beacon Design, Gould Evans, Fuss & O’Neill, Sustainable Settlements, LSL Planning, & Civitech.
    • 49. Stormwater Urbanism
    • 50. morrisbeacon.comimplementing community vision
      Jonathan Ford, PE
      Principal
      Morris Beacon Design
      Providence, RI
      jford@morrisbeacon.com
      www.morrisbeacon.com
      twitter: @jonford_MBD

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