Teenage Obesity <ul><li>Issues in the Teacher Education Field Presentation by Cory Nelson </li></ul>-The Issue of Teenage ...
Teenage Obesity
Teenage Obesity <ul>As of January 2011- 15 % of all teenagers are obese (which has tripled since  20 years ago) As a resul...
The Mayo Clinic of Rochester, MN Says: <ul>“ ...obese children often display poorer social skills than their normal weight...
Mayo clinic on depression of obese children... <ul>“ Continual low self-esteem and hopelessness, often supplemented by poo...
Teen Suicide <ul>In a survey of high school students, the National Youth Violence Prevention Resource Center found that al...
THINK about that! In1991: 1 out of every 20 students had a (BMI) greater then 25. In 2011: 1-2 of your students in every g...
These are you students!!
<ul>U.S. Dept of Agriculture is calling for change to help the over 25 million overweight and or obese students in the pub...
Dept Agricultural proposed rule: <ul>Decrease the amount of starchy vegetables, such as potatoes, corn and green peas, to ...
March 2010 Report by Columbia University's Teachers College: <ul><li>Healthier Students Are Better Learners: A missing lin...
“ Physical activity affects metabolism and all major body systems, exerting powerful positive influences on the brain and ...
The“…strongest evidence supports direct effects of physical activity on cognition and …other plausible pathways such as co...
The study warns against schools and educational reform movements that “mistakenly believe that physical education curricul...
Cont.. <ul><li>There is currently no evidence indicating that allocating more time to reading, mathematics and science by ...
A growing body of evidence shows that increased time for physical education and other school-based physical activity progr...
A June 2009 New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (NYCDOHMH) report titled “Childhood Obesity is a Serious...
What can we do? <ul>The practicality of increasing accountability and structured reform of what our children eat and how m...
A New Student – Mind, Body and Soul <ul>We know that obesity exists, but we also know it can  change.  As educators we wor...
Possible Solution: Student Profile <ul>Student: Jimmy Doe Age: 16 with a (BMI) below 20. Diet: Eats a whole grain based br...
Jimmy Doe profile cont. <ul>Academics: He has a 86% grade point average, which is 36% higher then when he was in 5 th  gra...
Jimmy Doe profile cont. <ul>Height: 5'9” Weight:139 Health:In 5 th  Grade was seen for a regular check up, his parents wer...
Jimmy Doe profile cont. <ul>Exercise: follows personal fitness plan (from 6 th  Grade SFC) has goals that he strives to ac...
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Teenage obesity presentation

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Phys. Ed based course, education reform.

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Teenage obesity presentation

  1. 1. Teenage Obesity <ul><li>Issues in the Teacher Education Field Presentation by Cory Nelson </li></ul>-The Issue of Teenage Obesity and how it effects our youth. -Steps that can be taken to correct the problem. -Enact programs and reform: to educate teens about their bodies.
  2. 2. Teenage Obesity
  3. 3. Teenage Obesity <ul>As of January 2011- 15 % of all teenagers are obese (which has tripled since 20 years ago) As a result of this “extra,” weight America's obese teens are less likely to participate in extracurricular activities, and sports. They are more likely to become depressed and have a low self esteem. As a result most stay home more often stray from developing social skill with friends, as well gaining more weight from snacking and increased T.V. In lie of physical activity. </ul>
  4. 4. The Mayo Clinic of Rochester, MN Says: <ul>“ ...obese children often display poorer social skills than their normal weight peers. The social stigmatization of obese children leads to self-esteem problems, which often leads to more social stigmatization. When a child constantly feels isolated, denigrated and helpless, her resulting actions in a social context might be hindered. The cycle then continues, as poor social skills often lead to more bullying.” </ul>
  5. 5. Mayo clinic on depression of obese children... <ul>“ Continual low self-esteem and hopelessness, often supplemented by poor functioning at school and in social contexts, often leads to depression in obese children. Even though depression is a psychological issue that many obese children deal with, depression often has social ramifications. Children might withdraw from activities they once enjoyed, experience additional weight gain, stop wanting to spend time with family or friends and act out in social contexts.” </ul>
  6. 6. Teen Suicide <ul>In a survey of high school students, the National Youth Violence Prevention Resource Center found that almost 1 in 5 teens had thought about suicide, about 1 in 6 teens had made plans for suicide, and more than 1 in 12 teens had attempted suicide in the last year. As many as 8 out of 10 teens who commit suicide try to ask for help in some way before committing suicide, such as by seeing a doctor shortly before the suicide attempt. </ul>
  7. 7. THINK about that! In1991: 1 out of every 20 students had a (BMI) greater then 25. In 2011: 1-2 of your students in every group of 12, will have a Body Mass Index greater then 25, 2 of your students will think about suicide, 2 will make plans to do it, and one will attempt it! 8 of your students will ask for help!
  8. 8. These are you students!!
  9. 9. <ul>U.S. Dept of Agriculture is calling for change to help the over 25 million overweight and or obese students in the public school system. This an attempt to lesson the chances of children developing serious help problems such as type 2 diabetes. </ul>
  10. 10. Dept Agricultural proposed rule: <ul>Decrease the amount of starchy vegetables, such as potatoes, corn and green peas, to one cup a week. Reduce sodium in meals over the next 10 years. A high school lunch now has about 1,600 milligrams of sodium. Through incremental changes, that amount should be lowered over the next decade to 740 milligrams or less of sodium for grades through 9 through 12; 710 milligrams or less for grades 6 through 8; 640 milligrams or less for kindergarten through fifth grades. Establish calorie maximums and minimums for the first time. For lunch: 550 to 650 calories for kindergarten through fifth grade; 600 to 700 for grades 6 through 8; 750 to 850 for grades 9 through 12. Serve only unflavored 1% milk or fat-free flavored or unflavored milk. Currently, schools can serve milk of any fat content. Increase the fruits and vegetables kids are offered. The new rule requires that a serving of fruit be offered daily at breakfast and lunch and that two servings of vegetables be offered daily at lunch. Over the course of a week, there must be a serving of each of the following: green leafy vegetables, orange vegetables (carrots, sweet potatoes, summer squash), beans, starchy and other vegetables. This is to make sure that children are exposed to a variety of vegetables. Increase whole grains substantially. Currently, there is no requirement regarding whole grains, but the proposed rules require that half of grains served must be whole grains. Minimize trans fat by using products where the nutrition label says zero grams of trans fat per serving. </ul>
  11. 11. March 2010 Report by Columbia University's Teachers College: <ul><li>Healthier Students Are Better Learners: A missing link in school reforms to close the achievement gap.
  12. 12. “ Physical activity affects metabolism and all major body systems, exerting powerful positive influences on the brain and spinal cord and, consequently, on emotional stability, physical health and ability to learn.”
  13. 13. The“…strongest evidence supports direct effects of physical activity on cognition and …other plausible pathways such as connectedness with school, absenteeism and dropping out.”
  14. 14. The study warns against schools and educational reform movements that “mistakenly believe that physical education curricular time should be sacrificed and reallocated to reading, mathematics and science.” </li></ul>
  15. 15. Cont.. <ul><li>There is currently no evidence indicating that allocating more time to reading, mathematics and science by reducing or eliminating physical education curricular time increases students’ standardized test scores.
  16. 16. A growing body of evidence shows that increased time for physical education and other school-based physical activity programs is associated with either a neutral or positive impact on academic outcomes.
  17. 17. A June 2009 New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (NYCDOHMH) report titled “Childhood Obesity is a Serious Concern in NYC: Higher Levels of Fitness Associated with Better Academics” revealed that overall, students in the top 5% in NYC FitnessGram score 36 percentile points higher on standardized tests than students in the bottom 5% in the NYC FitnessGram (national assessment tool). </li></ul>
  18. 18. What can we do? <ul>The practicality of increasing accountability and structured reform of what our children eat and how much physical activity they conduct daily is low. With constant budget cuts and lacking funding for phys ed. programs. But that does not change the solution... </ul>
  19. 19. A New Student – Mind, Body and Soul <ul>We know that obesity exists, but we also know it can change. As educators we work hard to strive to obtain the next level of development, and to set a new standard of learning and education. But is that limited to mathematics, grammar, sciences, and history? We study Bullying and Suicide without taking steps and measures to rise up out of the Dark Ages of human development! </ul>
  20. 20. Possible Solution: Student Profile <ul>Student: Jimmy Doe Age: 16 with a (BMI) below 20. Diet: Eats a whole grain based breakfast/lunch for his carbohydrates, he eats healthy proteins throughout the day, at lunch he has plenty of fruits and vegetables available to him. He drinks Soy milk or low-fat milk at least twice a day. Though he doesn’t always have healthy foods available at diner, he tries to eat within the Diet Plan his school dietician made for him (which has been updated bi-annually since 6 th grade) </ul>-He feels that his life is in his control because of the personal plans and classes that have been afforded him since 6 th grade.
  21. 21. Jimmy Doe profile cont. <ul>Academics: He has a 86% grade point average, which is 36% higher then when he was in 5 th grade (His grade average was below the state standard and he needed to attend summer remedial school) After remedial, he started his 6 th Grade year by sitting down with the School Fitness Consultant who explained that by changing his diet and beginning a life changing Physical Fitness plan that he could fulfill in and out of school. He has been meeting the goals they set ever since. He now works harder in school, and continues to work with a tutor to get better grades. He is motivated to do so because of the success of his peers who he didn't associate with before 6 th grade. </ul>
  22. 22. Jimmy Doe profile cont. <ul>Height: 5'9” Weight:139 Health:In 5 th Grade was seen for a regular check up, his parents were told that he was at risk for type 2 diabetes, as well as other health problems later in life. In 6 th Grade, his Fitness Consultant, reviewed the doctor's assessment, recommendations, and any health restraints. Since then he has lost 20lbs, reduced his BMI from 39.8 to 19.9. He has grown </ul>16 inches since 6 th grade, and now with lower body fat, he is very active and participates in many activities. He has recently had a a health assessment with his family doctor, and has improved greatly. His physician receives reports from the School Fitness Consultant and is pleased with the improvements.
  23. 23. Jimmy Doe profile cont. <ul>Exercise: follows personal fitness plan (from 6 th Grade SFC) has goals that he strives to achieve in and out of school. His school's Phys. Ed. Program includes 4 days of Cardiovascular and Muscle Strength/Endurance training <ul>-Cardio kickboxing, Pilates, Yoga, Tai Chi, adjusted jogging courses, push ups, pull ups,... </ul>Each Friday, he participates in various team sports instruction which showed him the value of team sports. He is graded in P.E. Based on how he obtains personal goals as well as midterm and final fitness assessments based on State Standard for his age. He exercises at home on weekends, his level of fitness encouraged him to play sports, and he does additional fitness plan laid out for him by his coach for offseason. </ul>
  24. 24. Jimmy Doe profile cont. <ul>Activities: Very active student, who is involved with many extra curricular activities; student government (with his girlfriend), the football and basketball teams, attends school dances and functions. Also participates in a after school peer tutoring program for 6 th grade students who are overweight (helps encourage and mentor students with health and self-esteem problems) Personal Life: Jimmy meets regularly with his schools guidance counselor and Fitness Consultant, upon entering 6 th grade he felt closed off from his peers, was embarrassed about his excess weight, he had very few friends to talk to about his sadness. As a result he stayed home frequently, over ate, watched TV, struggle to motivate himself to do homework. He would think about committing suicide when he was really sad. </ul>
  25. 25. Jimmy Doe profile cont. <ul>..since 6 th grade though Jimmy feels better about himself. He cares about his grades, talks with his guidance counselor about college, he feels closer to his peers through his active scholastic and athletic life in school. His grades aren't perfect but he continues to work to improve them. Even though he became healthy and fit youth, his parents were still overweight, they were members of America’s Obese adult population, but since they seen the strength and commitment Jimmy gained in school, they have joined there local gym, and even try to buy healthier foods (especially since Jimmy is always asking for food items that are available to him at school) </ul>
  26. 26. Is this a fairy tale? It isn't if we decide these are the outcome we want for all our students within the system. It will require reform, like all breakthroughs in teachers education, we need to realize that the days of children being active outside the classroom is going away, one of out jobs as educators is to prepare our students for the outside world. And we are failing them if we do not teach them to excel in ALL aspects of life! Reforming our schools by having: Healthy Food only cafeteria (Children have their home for treats, we cannot feed our kids poison and expect them to be healthy!) Phys. Ed. Reform – curriculum should be physical fitness – helping students be fit! - 4 days of exercise based classes -designed to increase cardiovascular and muscle strength endurance. 1 day of Fun sports/Activities to show students that team work and to show its fun to be active.
  27. 27. Discussion and Questions?? <ul>&quot;School choice opponents regularly use fear tactics to defeat new programs. They warn choice will destroy public education and lead to an economically and culturally stratified society. But once choice becomes a part of the system, and the doomsday scenarios fail to develop, those fear tactics no longer have the same persuasive power.&quot; Michael Van Winkle Choice & Education Across the States The Heartland Institute </ul>
  28. 28. Works Cited/For more info: <ul><li>&quot; Teen Obesity Statistics | Teen Obesity.&quot; Teen Obesity. Web. 18 Oct. 2011. < http://www.teenobesity.net/teen-obesity-statistics.html >.
  29. 29. Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/174900-the-social-effects-of-obesity-in-children/#ixzz1bes8i1Pj
  30. 30. Hellmich, Nanci. &quot;USDA Calls for Dramatic Change in School Lunches - USATODAY.com.&quot; News, Travel, Weather, Entertainment, Sports, Technology, U.S. & World - USATODAY.com. Web. 18 Oct. 2011. < http://www.usatoday.com/yourlife/food/diet-nutrition/2011-01-12-schoollunch13_ST_N.htm >
  31. 31. &quot;Sports and Fitness Are Necessary to School Reform | Ichallengemyself.org.&quot; Ichallengemyself.org | Helping Youth Develop Physically, Academically, and Socially. Web. 18 Oct. 2011. <http://ichallengemyself.org/?page_id=281>.
  32. 32. Van Winkle, Michael. &quot;Quotes-education-reform-school-.&quot; Http://www.intellectualtakeout.org. Web. <http://www.intellectualtakeout.org/content/quotes-education-reform-school-choice?library_node=25150>. </li></ul>

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