Cmst 101 slideshow newzealand-group5

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  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_New_Zealand
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demographics_of_New_Zealand
  • (n.d.). Retrieved from Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haka
  • (n.d.). Retrieved from Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haka
  • Cmst 101 slideshow newzealand-group5

    1. 1. By: C h r i s t i n a Va u g h a n (Gender Roles, Verbal Rituals/Traditions, Op en-ended questions, communica tion concept, citations) Erika Smith (Informal-NonverbalNEW ZEALAND use of Clothing) Dawnnitta Smith (Formal-Nonverbal use of Clothing, communicati on concept) Yo u a X i o n g (Nonverbal Rituals/Traditions, Int roduction, Conclusion, Presentation organization and format, open-ended questions, history, Ne w Zealand Today, communication concept, citations)
    2. 2. CULTURAL COMMUNICATION The purpose of this presentation is to have a better understanding of New Zealand and their culture through various verbal and non-verbal communication. In this presentation you will see the dif ferent gender roles, formal and informal nonverbal use of clothing, and verbal and nonverbal rituals/traditions. Culture is defined as a learned system of knowledge, behavior, attitudes, beliefs, values, and norms that is shared by a group of people and shaped from one generation to the next (pg. 150).
    3. 3. HISTORY First discovered and settled by Polynesians who developed the Maori culture The first European explorer to discover New Zealand was Abel Janszoom Tasman on December 13, 1642 In 1840 the treaty of Waitangi was signed between the British Crown and many Maori chiefs bringing New Zealand into the British Empire thus giving Maori equal rights with British citizens.
    4. 4. NEW ZEALAND TODAY The country is about 1 ,243 miles from Australia The capital is Wellington, in the North Island. In 2011 the total population is estimated at 4.4 million The five largest cities are Auckland (with 1/3 of the country’s population), Christchurch, Wellington, Hamilton, and Tauranga. The majority of the country’s population is European descent at 69%. The Maori is the largest minority at 14.6%. English, Maori, and New Zealand sign language are the of ficial languages with English being the predominant language.
    5. 5. GENDER ROLES By: C h r i s t in a Va u g h a nGender roles in the Maori Culture of New Zealand have very specific duties due totheir sex. Women of the Maori culture are responsible for telling stories and are incharge of the songs and dances. The Blue Book of Communication suggests that“Women, research suggests, tend to use communication for the purpose ofrelating or connecting with others, of extending themselves to other persons toknow them and to be known by them” (pg. 144). This holds true for Maori womenbecause song, dance and storytelling is what makes relationships and it is alsoused as a way to develop lasting friendships.Men on the other hand have a completely different way of expressing themselvesthrough communication. According to The Blue Book of Communication, “Mentend to talk to accomplish something or complete a task” (pg. 144). Maori menare considered to be warriors and protectors of their families. They are verystraight to the point when it comes to social interaction and are very selectiveduring the exchange of conversation. They are responsible for difficult tasks thatrequire more physical labor in contrast to women’s verbal duties.
    6. 6. GENDER ROLES This greeting is called hongi; they press their noses together. It is believed that their spirits mingle through this.
    7. 7. MAORI WOMEN Women out number men due to their longer life expectancy They are responsible for taking care of the family and for cooking Women were not allowed to be near the car ver s or car ve at all because of their menstrual cycle Women are in charge of the songs and dances and are responsible for the stories to get told.
    8. 8. MAORI MEN Men are warriors and are considered to be superior over women They are responsible for clearing the ground for farming purposes Men do all of the deep -sea fishing They are the designated carvers.
    9. 9. FAMILY LIFE Marriage partners are chosen by one’s father Divorce is very common and the process easy to do The male is the leader of the family. Children are greatly desired and it is common for a Maori family to have many children to assist with chores
    10. 10. NONVERBAL USE OF CLOTHING By: Erika Smith (INFORMAL)
    11. 11. INFORMAL WEAR IN NEW ZEALAND Typically casual clothes are worn. Land of extremes, all weather conditions can occur in one day.
    12. 12. NEW ZEALAND: SPRING & SUMMER Hot weather In New Zealand occurs in November -March. Informal clothing  Light cotton clothing  Shorts and skirts  Sun hats  Swim wear
    13. 13. NEW ZEALAND: FALL & WINTER Cold weather in New Zealand occurs during April -October Informal clothing  Wool clothing  Gloves, hats, and scarves  Long pants  Coats
    14. 14. NEW ZEALAND INFORMAL FOOTWEAR Casual footwear weather permitting  Sneakers  Walking shoes  Sandals
    15. 15. NONVERBAL USE OF By: CLOTHING (FORMAL) Dawnnitta SmithOne on the largest forms of nonverbal communication is clothing. Outside ofkeeping our bodies warm and protected, clothing conveys one’s self or culture.For the Maori people their clothing represents the cultures strength. From theclothing themselves (shirt, belt, skirt or kilt) to the designs used, they all are arepresentation of the culture, families within, and individual status. The livelycolors and designs called Taniko, typically represent a family or sub-tribe. Theywear this symbol proudly and celebrate the longevity of their blood lines. TheKakahu or cloaks represent status and are passed down through generations.The more feathers on a Kakahu, the greater the value and the more respect isgiven. Just like with the American culture, the better the suit the more it isassumed that that person is of higher status.
    16. 16. NONVERBAL USE OF CLOTHING For important and ceremonial occasions Maori dignitaries, members of the emperor family, selected Heads of State, members of concert groups, and people who have been awarded the entitlement to wear traditional clothing.
    17. 17. KAKAHU Kakahu is the name for Maori traditional cloaks. Even though Kakahu are par t of the traditional Maori attire, only those with high prestige are allowed to wear them. Feather Cloaks called Kahu Huruhuru are the most highly prized as a family and per sonal heirloom. Their linings are made from strips of dog skin with hair attached.
    18. 18. TANIKO DESIGNS Taniko designs have special significance because they symbolize family, tribe, and/or sub -tribe and can often be seen on costumes worn during a cultural presentation or festival.  Taniko designs can be found on kakahu (cloak) and Pari (bodice)  On a kakahu the taniko is found at the bottom  On some pari taniko designs are based on a square or rectangular shape with the dominant design motif worked in the centre front  Some are based on multiple recurring diamond designs aligned vertically in the style of the whakarua kopito (two points) classification of taniko designs, and others are narrow horizontal design strips.
    19. 19. RITUALS/TRADITIONS By: (VERBAL) C h r i s t in a Va u g h a n
    20. 20. THE IMPORTANCE OF SONG Traditionally, Maori people are accustomed to greeting guests with a song which is sang in Maori The guest must be prepared for this display by having a designated person (the caller) to respond to the hosts song. The song tells a story of ones homeland This exchange in song displays mutual respect from both the host and the guest.
    21. 21. MAORI PROVERBS Oral tradition in the Maori Culture is greatly valued. Proverbs are used to set guidelines and ethics for people. When one seeks advice from an elder, they often are told a proverb. Some examples of traditional proverbs are:  -“The more you ask how much longer it will take, the longer the journey seems”  -”Many stars cannot be concealed by a small cloud”
    22. 22. RITUALS/TRADITIONS By: Youa Xiong (NONVERBAL)According to “The Blue Book of Communication”, artifacts affect how we feelabout ourselves and how we are perceived by others (pg. 95). The Maoriculture of New Zealand display a nonverbal ritual with their facial tattooswhich states their status. If someone from a different culture were to assumedifferently without understanding nonverbal communication, they would thenjudge the Maori culture based on their assumptions.Kinesics is a general term for human movements, gestures, and posture (pg.95). The Maori culture communicate nonverbally with kinesics through theirtraditional Haka dances.
    23. 23. TATTOOS The head was considered a very sacred part of the body; therefore the head was mainly the only body part that was tattooed. Tattoos were only for the high ranked Maori. Those who went without them were seen as a person of no social status. Tattooing starts at puberty and makes a warrior attractive to a woman as well as marking rites of passages and important events in that person’s life. Facial tattoos basically were their identity card. It showed their rank, status, and ferocity. Females were usually only tattooed on the lips and chin.
    24. 24. HAKA DANCE  B a c k i n t h e day, Wa r H a ka wa s pe r fo rm ed be fo re a ba t t l e to pro c l a i m th e i r s tre n g th i n o rde r to i n t i midate t h e i r o ppo n e n t s.  N ow, t h e H a ka da n c e i s do n e fo r a m us ement , we l c o min g g ue s t s , o r to a c k n ow ledge a c h i evement s o r s pe c i al o c c a sio ns.  Th e da n c e i s a po s t ure da n c e t h a t i nvolves v i g oro us m ovement s, s t a m pi ng fe et , a n d s h o ut ing rhy t h m i c a lly. Ot h e r a c t i o n s i n c l ude : fa c i a l c o n to r t i ons, s l a ppi ng o f h a n ds a g a inst t h e bo dy, c ri e s , a n d g run t s . Al l th e s e a cti o n s h ave th e i r way o f ex pre s sing c o ura g e , a n n oya nc e, j oy, a n d o r ot h e r fe e l ings re l a t i n g to t h e purpo s e o f t h e o c c a sio n.
    25. 25. IN CONCLUSION… E a c h m e m be r’ s c o n t ri but i o n to t h i s pre s e n t a t ion i n c l ude d:  Christina Vaughan  (Gender Roles, Verbal Rituals/Traditions, Open -ended questions, communication concept, citations)  Erika Smith  (Informal-Nonverbal use of Clothing )  Dawnnitta Smith  (Formal-Nonverbal use of Clothing, communication concept )  Youa Xiong  (Nonverbal Rituals/Traditions, Introduction, Conclusion, Presentation organization and format, open-ended questions, New Zealand History, New Zealand Today, communication concept, citations)In o rde r to h ave bet te r c o m m unic at ion w i t h N ew Z e a l and’ s c ul t ure , o n e m us t h avea c l e a r un de r s t a n din g o f t h e i r g e n de r ro l e s , i n fo rm al a n d fo rm a l us e o fc l ot h ing, a n d ve rba l a n d n o nve rbal ri t ua l s /t radit ions. In do i n g s o , yo u w i l l bea bl e to a da pt to t h e i r c ul t ure e a s i er a n d n ot h ave c ul t ure s h o c k but i n te rc ul t ura lc o m m unic at ion. Of te n t i m e s pe o pl e m ay a s s ume c e r t a i n t h i n g s a bo ut a c ul t urew i t h o ut a c t ua l l y k n ow i ng t h e c ul t ure fi r s t a n d t h i s m ay c re a te ba rri e r s bet we e nc ul t ure s . B ut i f s o m eon e t a ke s t h e t i m e s to un de r s t a n d t h e i r c ul t ure i n va ri o usway s , i t w i l l preve n t s uc h t h i n g s fro m h a ppe n i n g. Th a t i s w hy c ul t ura lc o m m unic at ion i s s o i m po r t a n t .
    26. 26. QUESTIONS Th e i n di g enous pe o pl e o f N ew Z e a l and a re t h e M a o ri pe o pl e ; t h ey l i ve o f f o f t he l a n d a n d l i ve i n a ve r y t i g h t k n i t c o m m un it y. If eve r yo ne i n t h e US a do pte d t h i s way o f l i fe , wo ul d i t be s uc c e s sful? E x pl a i n. Low i n c o me s c h o o ls i n N ew Z e a l a nd a re fun de d by t h e g ove rn ment , n ot by pro pe r t y t a xe s ; s o yo u t h i n k t h a t g ove rn ment fun di n g i s t h e a n s we r to s uppl e ment ing e duc a t i o n al ex pe n s es o r s h o ul d i t be t a x paye r s re s po n sibilit y ? Why ? In New Z e a l a nd, th e M a o ri us e t a t to o s a s a way to s h ow t h e i r s t a t us , ra n k , fe ro c i t y, a n d a s we l l a s m a rk i n gs o f i m po r t a n t eve n t s i n t h e i r l i fe . I n my c ul t ure ( H m o n g), t a t to o s a re frow n e d upo n a n d a re s e e n a s a re be l l ious a c t i o n. Wh a t a re s o m e t h i n g s s e e n a s g o o d i n t h e Am e ri c a n c ul t ure , but ba d i n yo ur c ul t ure a n d w hy ? D e Fa c to re l a t i onships a re ve r y c o m m o n i n N ew Z e a l a nd w h i c h m e a n s t h a t c h i ldre n a re co m m o nly ra i s e d by a n a un t o r ot h e r c l o s e re l a ti ve w h i l e th e s i n gle pa re n t wo rk s . D o yo u t h i n k t h i s e f fe c t s a c h i l d s upbri n g i n g i n a n e g a t ive o r po s i t ive way ?
    27. 27. REFERENCES B e a t e C i s s e . ( 2 0 0 8 ) N e w Z e a l a n d Va c a t i o n s i n W e s t A u c k l a n d . [ 0 5 / 2 8 / 2 0 1 2 ] h t t p : / / w w w. n e w - z e a l a n d - v a c a t i o n s - i n - w e s t - a u c k l a n d . c o m / f a m o u s - p r o v e r b s . h t m l B e e b e , S . A . , B e e b e , S . J . , & I v y, D . K . ( 2 0 1 ) . T h e B l u e B o o k o f C o m m u n i c a t i o n S t u d i e s ( T C C Custom Edition ed. pg. 53, 95, 158, 159). Boston: Allyn and Bacon. F r e s h m a n E n g l i s h C l a s s o f M r s . E . F e i e r t a g . ( 2 0 0 4 ) M a o r i G e n d e r R o l e s . [ 0 5 / 17 / 2 01 2 ] h t t p : / / o r g . n e w t r i e r. k 1 2 . i l . u s / a c a d e m i c s / f a c u l t y / f e i e r t a g / 1 1 3 / M a o r i % 2 0 P r o j e c t / M a o r i % 2 0 P r o j e c t % 2 0 2 0 0 4 / P e r i o d % 2 07 / g r o u p 4 / M a o r i % 2 0 P r o j e c t . h t m New Zealand Aotearoa (2009). “New Zealands Information Network”. Retrieved May 20, 201 2 from Bing.com: http://www.bing.com/images/searc h?q=maori+people&view=detail&id=FCBDDB 4044EEBDA35 E B 2 5 4 A C 2 5 2 E A 61 1 8 6 0 D 1 61 F & f i r s t = 0 & F O R M = I D F R I R Nur sing 3 2 2 . “ Maori Family” . Retrieved May 2 0 , 2 01 2 f rom B ing.c om: h t t p : / / n u r s i n g 3 2 2 s p 1 0 . f i l e s . w o r d p r e s s . c o m / 2 01 0 / 0 3 / f a m i l y 1 . j p g (n.d.). Retrieved from Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Histor y_of_New_Zealand (n.d.). Retrieved from Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demographics_of_New_Zealand (n.d.). Retrieved from Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haka
    28. 28. REFERENCES (CONT.) Paul Polkinghorne (201 2). “Maori People and Their Culture”. Retrieved May 19, 201 2 from Bing.com: http:// www.bing.com/images/searc h?q=maori+people&view=detail&id=FCBDDB 4044EEBDA35 E B 2 5 4 A C 2 5 2 E A 61 1 8 6 0 D 1 61 F & f i r s t = 0 & F O R M = I D F R I R R e x ( 2 0 1 0 ) . “ T h e Te l e g r a p h ” . R e t r i e v e d M a y 2 0 , 2 0 1 2 f r o m B i n g . c o m : http://www.bing.com/images/searc h?q=maori+people&view=detail&id=FCBDDB 4044EEBDA35 E B 2 5 4 A C 2 5 2 E A 61 1 8 6 0 D 1 61 F & f i r s t = 0 & F O R M = I D F R I R S m i t h , J e n n i f e r. ( 2 0 0 6 ) . " P a n d a I m a g e s . " R e t r i e v e d M a y 3 1 , 2 0 1 1 , f r o m O n l i n e Images, OnlineImages.com: http://www.onlineimages.com/pandapics.html T h r o n g M e d i a ( 2 0 0 6 ) I n s i d e N e w Z e a l a n d - S e x Wa r s , E x p l o r i n g N Z S e x u a l P o l i t i c s , T h u r s d a y A p r i l 1 9 . T h r o n g . [ 0 5 / 1 9 / 2 01 2 ] h t t p : / / w w w . t h r o n g . c o . n z / 2 0 07 / 0 4 / i n s i d e - n e w - z e a l a n d - s e x - wars-exploring-nz-sexual-politics-thursday -april-19/ U n k n o w n . ( 1 9 9 6 ) C u l t u r e o f N e w Z e a l a n d . C o u n t r i e s a n d T h e i r C u l t u r e s . [ 0 5 / 1 5 / 2 01 2 ] http://www.ever yc ulture.c om/Ma -Ni/New -Zealand.html#ixzz 1v0 sqxepC W h i t m o r r, R . ( n . d . ) . T h e M a o r i . R e t r i e v e d f r o m N e w Z e a l a n d i n H i s t o r y : h t t p : / / h i s t o r y - nz.org/maori3.html

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