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Chapter 2:2 Views of Earth- Viewpoints
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Chapter 2:2 Views of Earth- Viewpoints

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Latitude, Longitude, Timezones …

Latitude, Longitude, Timezones

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  • 1.  
  • 2. Chapter: Views of Earth Table of Contents Section 3: Maps Section 1: Landforms Section 2: Viewpoints
  • 3. Latitude and Longitude —Latitude
    • The equator is an imaginary line around Earth exactly halfway between the north and south poles.
    • Lines running parallel to the equator are called lines of latitude , or parallels .
    • Latitude is the distance, measured in degrees , either north or south of the equator .
    Viewpoints 2
  • 4. Latitude and Longitude —Latitude
    • The equator is at 0° latitude , and the poles are each at 90° latitude .
    • Locations north and south of the equator are referred to by degrees north latitude and degrees south latitude, respectively.
    Viewpoints 2
  • 5. Longitude
    • These vertical lines have two names — meridians and lines of longitude .
    • Just as the equator is used as a reference point for lines of latitude, there’s a reference point for lines of longitude— the prime meridian .
    Viewpoints 2
    • This imaginary line represents 0° longitude.
  • 6. Longitude
    • Longitude refers to distances in degrees east or west of the prime meridian .
    Viewpoints 2
    • Points west of the prime meridian have west longitude measured from 0° to 180°, and points east of the prime meridian have east longitude, measured similarly.
  • 7. Prime Meridian
    • The prime meridian does not circle Earth as the equator does.
    Viewpoints 2
    • Rather, it runs from the north pole through Greenwich, England , to the south pole.
    • The line of longitude on the opposite side of Earth from the prime meridian is the 180° meridian.
  • 8. Prime Meridian
    • You can locate places accurately using latitude and longitude.
    Viewpoints 2
    • Note that latitude position always comes first when a location is given.
  • 9. Time Zones
    • Time is measured by tracking Earth’s movement in relation to the Sun.
    Viewpoints 2
    • Each day has 24 h, so Earth is divided into
    24 time zones. Each time zone is about 15° of longitude wide.
  • 10. Calendar Dates
    • In each time zone, one day ends and the next begins at midnight.
    Viewpoints 2
    • If it is 11:59 P.M. Tuesday, then 2 min later it will be 12:01 A.M. Wednesday in that particular time zone.
  • 11. International Date Line
    • You gain or lose time when you enter a new time zone.
    Viewpoints 2
    • The International Date Line is the transition line
    for calendar days.
  • 12. International Date Line Viewpoints 2
    • If you were traveling west across the International Date Line, located near the 180 ° meridian , you would move your calendar
    forward one day. Traveling east, (against the sun) you would move your calendar back one day.
  • 13. Section Check 2 Question 1 The imaginary line representing 0º longitude is the ________. A. equator B. International Date Line C. prime meridian D. time zone transition line
  • 14. Section Check 2 Answer The answer is C . This line was chosen by astronomers in 1884 .
  • 15. Section Check 2 Question 2 What imaginary line separates Earth into the northern and southern hemispheres? A. equator B. International Date Line C. prime meridian D. time zone transition line
  • 16. Section Check 2 Answer The answer is A. The equator is at 0º latitude, and the poles are each at 90º latitude.
  • 17. Section Check 2 Question 3 What location is nearest to the transition line for calendar days? A. 0º latitude B. 0º longitude C. 180º latitude D. 180º meridian
  • 18. Section Check 2 Answer The answer is D. The International Date Line is located near the 180º meridian.