Indroniel Ganguly

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Indroniel Ganguly's presentation at "Shifting Seasons: Great Lakes Forest, Industry, Products, and Resources Summit"

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Indroniel Ganguly

  1. 1. * Eco-Labeling Native American Tribal Forest Products Presented by: Dr. Indroneil Ganguly Center for International Trade in Forest Products (CINTRAFOR) University of Washington Co-authors: Dr. Ivan L. Eastin & Dr. Gary S. Morishima Presented at the: Forest Resources Summit Menominee Casino Resort, Keshena, WI June 6th – 7th, 2012
  2. 2. * Research sponsored by: * Intertribal Timber Council* Contributors to the research: * C. Larry Mason; James D. Petersen; Wade Zammit; James Freed; Scott Atkison *Acknowledgements:
  3. 3. 1. Background2. Objectives3. Survey4. Results on Branding5. Results on Certification6. Summary7. Post research activities and initiatives *Outline
  4. 4. Background
  5. 5. *America’s Indian tribes own and manage more than 7.7 million acres of timberland and another 10.2 million acres of woodlands in the continental United States.*Alaska natives own another 44 million acres of forestland.*Native Americans have been managing forests for millennia and, unlike other forestland owners, have an intergenerational cultural commitment to continuation of stewardship practices in perpetuity.
  6. 6. Total area of tribal reservation (in the continental US) 57,105,943 acres Forested (32%) 18,637,903 acres Unreserved (90% of forested) 17,382,324 acres Accessible forestlands 15,330,420 acres Timberlands Woodlands6,316,133 acres 9,014,287 acres Commercial Timberlands Timberlands5,959,361 acres 3,810,083 acres Summary: Commercial forestland totals 9,769,444 acres with 61% being located in timberlands and 39% located in woodlands
  7. 7. * Summary statistics of tribal forestland in the US, in acres:
  8. 8. Objectives
  9. 9. * Exploring potential opportunities and benefits from branding and marketing initiatives of tribal products:* Differentiate forest products from Indian lands by virtue of * Unique cultural aspects * Environmental services * Public benefits * Sustainability, and * product quality values provided through Tribal forest management. *Project Objective
  10. 10. * Enhance value from forest resources to enable tribes to care for their lands and people* Increase public awareness of the virtues of tribal natural resource management * Potential strategic importance in efforts to protect and advance tribal sovereignty and influence natural resource management across the landscape *Beyond Wood Products
  11. 11. *The specific sub-objectives of the tribal branding study conducted by CINTRAFOR were to:1. Understand how various forest certification and eco-labeling programs are perceived and used by the tribes in marketing their wood/wood products2. Explore the potential and acceptability of a tribal branding program and3. Identify the branding attributes favored by Tribal respondents *Specific Sub-Objectives
  12. 12. *The study explored opportunities in
  13. 13. *The study explored opportunities in
  14. 14. Survey
  15. 15. A total of 54 tribes responded to the survey out of apopulation of 229 tribes for a response rate of 23.6%.Total reservation area is 57,105,943 acres and surveyrespondents represent 31,255,168 acres with tribalreservation coverage of 54.7%.Total forest area is 18,637,903 acres and surveyrespondents represent 12,929,237 acres with tribal forestcoverage of 69.4%.The total commercial forest area of the tribes is9,769,444 acres and survey respondents represent6,540,013 acres, with tribal commercial forest coverageof 66.9%.Response rate for ITC member tribes was 62.3% (38 of 61members responded)*Survey Response: various metrics
  16. 16. AK 2 Forestland Surveys Processing Facility Surveys *Location of respondents
  17. 17. *Comparative interest in the three potential tribal marketing programs
  18. 18. Branding Results
  19. 19. Interest in a Tribal Branding Program 40% 36% 36% 35% 30%Percentage of Respondents . 25% 20% 20% 15% 10% 6% 5% 2% 0% Not Interested Not Very Neutral Somewhat Very Interested At All Interested Interested Interest in participating in a tribal branding program Center for International Trade in Forest Products
  20. 20. Attributes for a Branding ProgramRespondent ranking of tribal values in forming the foundation of atribal forest products brand Center for International Trade in Forest Products
  21. 21. Attributes for a Branding Program Tribal interest insupporting economic development West High quality wood South Midwest Spiritual/Culturalrespect for the land Northeast Traditional forest stewardship 1 2 3 4 5 6 Importance . Respondent ranking of attributes varied substantially by region Center for International Trade in Forest Products
  22. 22. Attributes for a Branding Program Tribal interest insupporting economic development High quality wood Spiritual/Culturalrespect for the land Traditional forest stewardship 1 2 3 4 5 6 Importance . < 10,000 acres 10,000 to 100,000 acres > 100,000 acres Respondent ranking of attributes were quite consistent by size of forest area Center for International Trade in Forest Products
  23. 23. Suggestions for tribal forest product brand (some examples)
  24. 24. Tribal Certification Results
  25. 25. Interest in a Tribal Certification Program 35% 32% 30% 30% 30% 25%Percentage of Respondents . 20% 15% 10% 5% 4% 4% 0% Not Interested Not Very Neutral Somewhat Very Interested At All Interested Interested Interest in participating in a tribal forest certification program Center for International Trade in Forest Products
  26. 26. Forest Certification Status 45% 39% 40% 35%Percentage of Respondents . 29% 30% 22% 25% 20% 15% 10% 6% 4% 5% 0% Not Aware Aware but never Considering forest In the process Have certification considered certification Tribal awareness and current status of forest certification Center for International Trade in Forest Products
  27. 27. Usefulness of Forest Certification 35% 29% 30% 27% 22% 25%Percentage of Respondents . 20% 13% 15% 9% 10% 5% 0% 0% I dont know Not At All Not Useful Neutral Somewhat Very Useful Useful Useful Tribal perceptions of the usefulness of forest certification Center for International Trade in Forest Products
  28. 28. Perceptions of Price Premiums 50% 45% 45% 40%Percentage of Respondents . 35% 30% 30% 25% 21% 20% 15% 10% 5% 2% 2% 0% Dont know No price premium Small price Substantial price High price premium premium premium Forest managers perceptions of price premiums for certified wood Center for International Trade in Forest Products
  29. 29. • Respondents presented a mixture of experiences and expectations with many (especially in the South) indicating little knowledge of certification options.• Better understanding of the costs and benefits of certification for aiding sales into emerging “green building” markets could benefit Native forest products marketing programs.• Despite regional differences, the tribal branding program is generally preferred by the tribes over other options across the country.• Development of a tribal brand will require a long-term commitment of resources (both financial and human) to create, promote, and maintain an effective branding program. • The branding campaign will emphasize the tribal values identified in the research *Summary Results
  30. 30. The survey results also suggest that a large number of tribes areinterested in learning how to access international markets toprovide a measure of protection against downturns in the domesticmarkets and/or to receive higher prices for their forest products.While domestic market remains in recession, US exports of woodin products increased by 29.6% in 2010Given the interest by the Obama administration in increasing USexports by 50% by 2015, how might Native American tribes takeadvantage of this effort to increase their international marketingcapacity and expertise? *Summary Results
  31. 31. Tribal Branding ProgramThe survey results suggest that there is support fordeveloping a tribal brand for forest products that couldbe based on a unique set of tribal values: • Traditional forest stewardship ethic • Spiritual and cultural respect for forests and land • High quality timber resource Center for International Trade in Forest Products
  32. 32. Then we talked to the tribes
  33. 33. Tribal Branding Program First Things First1) Do the tribes want to proceed with the development of a tribal brand for forest products?2) Do the tribes want to proceed with a cooperative marketing program?3) Do the tribes want to proceed with a tribal certification program? Center for International Trade in Forest Products
  34. 34. Tribal Branding Program Strategic Issues1) Scope of a tribal brand • national vs. regional vs. enterprise specific • solid wood products vs. generic forest products (incl. NTFP’s)2) Brand Development (who takes the lead in the development of a tribal brand and quality standards?) • ITC • tribal forest products brand council • outside consulting firm3) How would a branding program be funded? • start up funding • programmatic funding4) Which tribal enterprises wish to participate? Center for International Trade in Forest Products
  35. 35. Initiatives taken by CINTRAFOR
  36. 36. Project funded by US Department of Commerce:Developing the International Forest Products MarketingCapacity of Native American Tribes (Eastin and Ganguly)1. assessing the technical and marketing capabilities of tribal forest operations2. identifying potential niche markets where tribal forest products would be competitive3. providing workshops on export topics such as international marketing, export logistics and export financing,4. working with tribal cooperators to develop strategic business plans for export markets,5. linking tribal managers with potential customers in international markets through trade missions Center for International Trade in Forest Products
  37. 37. Project funded by USDA-CSREES – NNF program:National Needs Fellowship for Tribal Students (Eastin andGanguly)Developing a strategic partnership with Native Americancolleges, this program will identify qualified students fromtribal communities to transfer the necessary technical andforestry business skills into Native American communities. Center for International Trade in Forest Products
  38. 38. Thank you

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