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Montessori 2010 - Brand Communications and Successful Marketing

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What is your school’s identity? What are its unique features and benefits? Most importantly, how would the various constituents in your community answer the above questions? With rising tuitions and …

What is your school’s identity? What are its unique features and benefits? Most importantly, how would the various constituents in your community answer the above questions? With rising tuitions and increased competition, schools need to present a concise, compelling, and consistent message. Examine both traditional and new marketing tools, including social media, that will help you hone and project an accurate, positive image.

A presentation at the American Montessori Society 2010 Annual Conference by Andrea Naddaff, Partner and VP of Business Development.

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  • Corey McPherson Nash:
    Thoughtful Branding and Design
    Create distinctive, compelling brands and experience
    Our goal is to launch, evolve, enhance brands
    Our approach to social media is strategic
  • The brand map is a tool or guide to help clarify your brand.
  • “It was so far from sharing what you had for breakfast – yet it only works because it’s the same place where people talk about breakfast.”
    Evan Williams, Twitter Chief Executive referring to people using Twitter during the gasoline shortage in Atlanta last fall
    “Putting Twitter’s World to Use” NYT April 14, 2009
  • Make the line spacing consistent
  • Make the line spacing consistent
  • Make the line spacing consistent
  • Make the line spacing consistent
  • Change the dash to the bullet (make it consistent)
  • The important thing to realize is that people are going to talk about your school, your students, your faculty, your brand whether you are listening or not.
    There are people saying good things about your school.
  • And there are people out there who have mistaken impressions about your organization.
    One of the great things about social media is that you can listen in on all of these comments and conversations.
    And you need to do this to get an accurate picture of the perception of your brand
  • So, to conclude:
    There are people out there right now talking about your school, about your organization, about your students and faculty and programs. If you aren’t listening you won’t know
  • So to conclude
    You need to answer three important questions before you even get to the point of choosing your social media technology.
    what and how before you move into choosing a technology technology
  • It’s about engagement
  • Transcript

    • 1. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com
    • 2. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com March 27, 2010 Brand Communications and Successful Marketing American Montessori Society 2010 Annual Conference
    • 3. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Agenda · About You · About Us · About Marketing and Branding · Case Studies · Exercise and Handouts · Wrap Up
    • 4. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com ABOUT COREY
    • 5. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Corey McPherson Nash THOUGHTFUL BRANDING AND DESIGN We help organizations connect better with their audiences through brand, print and new media communications • Education • Healthcare • Culture and entertainment • Emerging business
    • 6. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Who We Are
    • 7. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Who We Are
    • 8. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Who We Are
    • 9. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS
    • 10. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com What is Communication vs. Marketing? COMMUNICATION MARKETING VS. WANTS PROSPECTS TO ACT WANTS AUDIENCES TO LISTEN
    • 11. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com The Marketing Challenge What has changed? · Audiences are smarter and more skeptical. · Social networking is far more powerful than communications. · Authenticity is essential. · The Web has enabled the “stealth applicant” to learn about you without your knowledge. · The higher tuition cost means families are looking for clear ROI.
    • 12. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com The Marketing Challenge What’s changed about communications? · Branding is not a dirty word. · The Internet has supplanted print as the primary channel of communications, both with prospects and with the community. · The role of print has changed from communicating information to communicating value.
    • 13. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com The Marketing Challenge The role of the Web: · Make it easy for visitors to find what they are looking for. · Don’t let marketing get in the way of performing tasks. The visitor’s experience of your Web site is often their first experience of your school. Don’t make it their last.
    • 14. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com The Marketing Challenge The role of print: · The Web removes from print the burden of carrying lots of information. · Use print to communicate value: What do you stand for and why should I care? · Print is a great vehicle for communicating emotion – more tactile, richer and easier to read. · Print should point the audience to the Web site.
    • 15. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com The Marketing Challenge The role of integrated identity: · Creates continuity of creative expression across print and Web · Uses visual and verbal language to reinforce key themes and messages · Streamlines communications – not constantly reinventing the wheel · Forces discipline internally, makes a good impression externally
    • 16. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Identity Diagram
    • 17. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com The Marketing Challenge But the channel doesn’t matter if the message isn’t clear.
    • 18. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com The Marketing Challenge Who are you? (identity) What do you offer? (features) Why should I care? (benefits)
    • 19. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Message Architecture The role of message architecture: · Own a Big Idea – credibly and authentically – that differentiates you from your peer schools. · Create visual and verbal language to communicate that idea to each of your audiences.
    • 20. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Message Architecture The goal of focusing the message: · Don’t leave all the messaging in the hands of your audiences. · Word-of-mouth is your most credible marketing channel – for better or for worse. · Parents of current students and the students themselves are your best ambassadors. Use new media to empower them.
    • 21. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com CMN Process New Media Print Brand Strategy Messaging Creative Strategy
    • 22. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com ABOUT BRANDING
    • 23. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com ?
    • 24. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com “Your brand is what people say about you when you leave the room.” – Jeff Bezos, founder and CEO, Amazon
    • 25. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Your brand is not what you say it is. It is what your constituents say it is.
    • 26. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com What is a Brand? Your brand is NOT your logo. (Although your logo is an important component of your brand expression.)
    • 27. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com What is a Brand? Your brand IS your reputation. It’s what people think when they hear your name.
    • 28. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com The Way CMN Thinks About Brand Brand = Physical + Mental · Physical = name + tagline + logo + color · Mental = benefit + values + personality
    • 29. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com The Way Corey Thinks About Brand The Physical + The Mental + = B R A N D
    • 30. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Brand Strategy Strategic Plan • Growth Objectives • Target Audiences • Market Landscape • Competitive Landscape Brand Strategy • Brand Perception • Brand Architecture • Brand Position • Messaging Strategy Execution • Visual Style • Community Outreach • Social Media • Public Relations • Online/Off-line • Communication Pieces
    • 31. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com The Way Corey Thinks About Brand · Position · The benefit that sets your brand apart. It is what you want to exist in the minds of the consumers. · Promise · The pledge to customers about the experience. · Permission · The scope of the brand – the do’s and don'ts. · Personality · The voice and attitude. · Permanence · The enduring qualities of the brand.
    • 32. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com The Way Corey Thinks About Brand · Sincerity · Down-to-Earth, Honest, Welcome, Cheerful · Excitement · Daring, Spirited, Imaginative, Up-to-date · Competence · Reliable, Intelligent, Successful · Sophistication · Upper class, charming · Ruggedness · Outdoorsy, Tough · Source: Dr. David Aaker, Building Strong Brands
    • 33. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Criteria for a Great Brand RELEVANT SUSTAINABLEDIFFERENTIATED Why should I care? How are you different or better? Is the value worth the cost?
    • 34. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Brand Map Individual aspects of your product or service What do your customers get out of using it How does it make them feel to use it What does it say about them to use it The manner in which you do it What is permanent
    • 35. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Messaging Architecture A promise is the pledge companies make to their customers about what they will experience when they do business with you. A position of a brand is the benefit that sets your brand apart; it is what you want to exist in the minds of consumers (e.g., Volvo = safe). This position provides a competitive advantage. A value proposition is a clear statement of the tangible results a customer gets from using your products or services. The more specific your value proposition is, the better. FIRST EXTERNAL SECOND EXTERNAL INTERNAL PROMISE POSITION VALUE PROPOSITION PRIMARY MESSAGES
    • 36. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com The Way Corey Thinks About Brand Time + Consistent Delivery + Consistent Communication = B R A N D E Q U I T Y
    • 37. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Summary Brand is a verb. It’s an activity, not an object. Creating a brand requires discipline and vigilance. What you say should be carefully considered, strategic and consistent. Your internal audience, not just external audience, is your brand advocate. You must socialize your brand. Adapt your messages for each audience, but be true to your core.
    • 38. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Why Invest in Branding Now?
    • 39. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Why Invest in Branding Now? Enrollment challenges: After decades of growth, school-age populations in the Northeast are projected to decline. Independent school populations decreased 1% between 1993 and 2006 and are expected to decline an additional 2% between 2006 and 2018. – “Projections of Education Statistics to 2018,” Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics
    • 40. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Why Invest in Branding Now? Fundraising challenges: Due to recent economic conditions, philanthropic donations are projected to decline 9% in 2009, compared with a 6.5% increase in 2008. – The Chronicle of Philanthropy, October 26, 2009
    • 41. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Why Invest in Branding Now? In this environment, you need to make the strongest possible case for your school.
    • 42. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Why Invest in Branding Now? That means: knowing what your audiences think, knowing what you want them to think, and then developing a system of behaviors and communications to close that gap.
    • 43. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Why Invest in Branding Now? If you don’t manage your brand, your audience will. That may work out if you are really good – and really lucky.
    • 44. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Why Invest in Branding Now? If you do manage your brand, you will build brand equity. Brand equity = consistent delivery + consistent communications + time
    • 45. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com SOCIAL MEDIA
    • 46. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Brand Strategy What is Branding? Strategic Plan • Growth Objectives • Target Markets • Market Landscape • Competitive Landscape Brand Strategy • Brand Perception • Brand Architecture • Position • Messaging Strategy Execution • Overall Look & Feel • Community Outreach • Social Media • Public Relations • Online/Off-line Communication Pieces
    • 47. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com What is Social Media Social media are primarily Internet-based tools for sharing and discussing information among human beings. This interaction, and the manner in which information is presented, depends on the varied perspectives and “building” shared meaning among communities, as people share their stories and experiences. - Wikipedia shared meaning among communities, as people share their stories and experiences. Creating a shared meaning is about creating a distinct, compelling and meaningful BRAND
    • 48. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com What is Social Media Telling Statistics: Have you ever “friended” a brand on Facebook or MySpace? FEED Survey by Razorfish, http://feed.razorfish.com/feed09/the-data/ (2009) 41% YES 59% NO
    • 49. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com What is Social Media Telling Statistics: Has an experience you have had online ever changed your opinion (either positively or negatively) about a brand or the products and services it offers? FEED Survey by Razorfish, http://feed.razorfish.com/feed09/the-data/ (2009) 65.3% YES 34.7% NO
    • 50. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com What is Social Media Telling Statistics: Has that experience influenced whether or not you purchased a product or service from the brand? FEED Survey by Razorfish, http://feed.razorfish.com/feed09/the-data/ (2009) 97.1% YES 2.9% NO
    • 51. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Telling Statistics: Are you more likely to buy/recommed a brand since becoming a friend/follower? Chadwick Martin Bailey and iModerate Research Technologies, http://www.emarketer.com/Article.aspx?R=1007568 (2010) What is Social Media 67% YES 51% YES
    • 52. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Traditional Brand Communications Traditional ways of communicating your brand: One-to-many: Advertising Print Radio TV Web site Blast email
    • 53. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Traditional Brand Communications Pros: · Cost-effective · Edited, filtered · Uniform · Consistent Cons: · Inauthentic, rehearsed · Bland, generic · Talking, not listening · Shallow, superficial · Slow to respond One-to-many
    • 54. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Traditional Brand Communications Traditional ways of communicating your brand: One-to-one: Phone calls Meetings Personal emails Written correspondence Parties Events
    • 55. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Traditional Brand Communications Pros: · Responsive · Engaging · Authentic · Personal · Deep Cons: · Limited reach · High cost per transaction · High risk One-to-one
    • 56. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com What are Social Media? SHOUTING! conversation gap
    • 57. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com What are Social Media? Why now? · People want to connect with people · Technology enables connections · Economics encourages activity online Source: Charlene Li and Josh Bernoff, Groundswell
    • 58. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Why schools should invest in social media: · Admissions · Alumni/ae relations · Fundraising
    • 59. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Admissions: the perspective of your audience · Anxiety about making the right decision for their child · Complexity of options and factors · Suspicious of “marketing” · Lack of trusted sources for information
    • 60. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Trusted Sources of Information Word of mouth succeeds because: · It’s believable · It’s self-reinforcing · It’s self-spreading Source: Charlene Li and Josh Bernoff, Groundswell
    • 61. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Widening Your Reach Social media reveals the weak links that often have the most value. “Brave New World of Digital Intimacy”, The New York Times, September 9, 2008
    • 62. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Relationships are Everything Alumni/ae Relations · A social network you “own” – alumni/ae want to connect with each other and with your school (in that order) · Alumni/ae also own your brand – for better or for worse · Identify and leverage your “champions” · Every one-on-one interaction on a social media platform is shared with the larger community
    • 63. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Social networks provide participants: · Anticipated reciprocity (I post, you respond) · Increased recognition (I blog, you comment) · Sense of efficacy · Source of referrals (anticipated reciprocity) Peter Kollack, The Economies of Online Cooperation: Gifts and Public Goods in Cyberspace (1998)
    • 64. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Corey’s Top Six Rules of Social Media: 1. Be authentic. 2. Fortify. Strengthen your current audience and engage new ones. 3. Connect. Publish content that invites your audience to participate. (Don’t sell, sell, sell.) 4. Be remarkable. Give your audience things to remark on. 5. Get outside (your site). Participate in other discussions, not just your own. 6. Embrace organic planning. Establish a plan, but be ready to adjust.
    • 65. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com
    • 66. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com
    • 67. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com
    • 68. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com
    • 69. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Summary 1. WHO do you want to reach?
    • 70. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com CHALLENGES
    • 71. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Challenges · Time · Resources · Budget · Economy · Brand Confusion
    • 72. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com · WHO IS MARIA MONTESSORI?
    • 73. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com What Does Montessori Mean? What Does Montessori Mean? Waldorf School? Self-directed learning I don’t know Is it some kind of cult or religion? My friends' kids go to one One-to-one interaction I know it’s not a public school but that’s all I know Learning the child’s way Open, progressive, alternative A child's pace
    • 74. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com The Marketing Challenge Who are you? (identity) What do you offer? (features) Why should I care? (benefits)
    • 75. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com CASE STUDIES
    • 76. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Case Studies · An Established School, Buckingham, Browne & Nichols · A Mission Driven Business School, Mendoza College of Business · A Start-Up Museum, The Boston Museum · An Elementary School’s Brand Revitalization, The Pike School
    • 77. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Case Study: BB&N Objectives · Rebrand and reposition the school with new messaging, identity, print and Web presence grounded in research · Capture the energy and vitality of learning at BB&N · Leverage what is unique about BB&N. Avoid making it look like just another New England prep school. · Communicate the compassionate and supportive nature of BB&N, but in ways that don’t compromise the high standards of performance.
    • 78. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com BB&N Integrated Communications Communications Issues: · No consensus on the attributes that differentiate BB&N from peer schools · No coordinated effort to assure that everyone is speaking about BB&N in the same way · External perception that BB&N is narrowly academic and rigorous at every level · The value of three separate campuses and the common culture that ties them together · Unclear on how to talk about athletics at BB&N · Disconnect between admissions communications and alumni/ae communications · Inherent challenge of communicating about pre-K through 12
    • 79. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com BB&N Integrated Communications Process: · In-depth interviews with BB&N audiences: staff, faculty, students, parents and alumni/ae · Develop user personas of parents and alumni/ae · Develop a brand strategy and message architecture that aligns with the goals of the school and is relevant, distinctive and sustainable. · Create visual and written communications that deliver the message in an appropriate form.
    • 80. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com BB&N Integrated Communications What we learned: • While the Upper School is very academically challenging, the Lower and Middle Schools are “developmentally appropriate” • The location of the schools on three separate campuses helps to reinforce the distinctive approach of each school • BB&N does a great job of recruiting – and supporting – a diverse group of families • For students, the location near Harvard Square is a huge plus
    • 81. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Message Architecture The pledge you make to those you serve about what they will experience by choosing your organization. The benefit that sets your brand apart. It is what you want to exist in the minds of those you serve. It is your competitive advantage. A value proposition is a clear statement of the tangible results one receives by taking advantage of your offer. FIRST EXTERNAL SECOND EXTERNAL INTERNAL PROMISE POSITION VALUE PROPOSITION PRIMARY MESSAGES
    • 82. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com BB&N Integrated Communications Brand Promise BB&N engages boys and girls in grades pre-K through 12 in a rich, invigorating, and developmentally appropriate educational experience of the highest quality, opening their minds to new possibilities while providing outstanding preparation for the next steps in their lives.
    • 83. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com BB&N Integrated Communications Brand Position Located near Harvard Square in Cambridge, BB&N is a coeducational day school for grades pre-K through 12 that engages students in an intense, vibrant, and multifaceted education. Bright, curious students from a broad range of backgrounds and with a broad range of interests learn from gifted faculty and from each other as they embrace the challenges of a premier educational experience.
    • 84. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com BB&N Integrated Communications Value Proposition In BB&N’s close-knit school community and motivating learning environment, students develop the intellectual skills and qualities of character that enable them to reach their fullest potential as learners and as people. ·
    • 85. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com BB&N Integrated Communications Messages for: •Prospective Lower School Parents •Prospective Middle School Parents •Prospective Upper School Parents •Prospective Upper School Students •Alumni/ae •Faculty and Staff •Role of Athletics at BB&N
    • 86. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com BB&N Integrated Communications Primary Message to Prospective Middle School Parents At BB&N students flourish during this crucial time of transition. The school taps their natural spontaneity, curiosity, and creativity through a rich and varied range of experiences inside and outside the classroom. They develop trust for teachers and other adult role models who care about them and know how to bring out their best. Students build a firm foundation for success in the Upper School and beyond.
    • 87. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com BB&N Integrated Communications Primary Message about the Role of Athletics at BB&N Interscholastic athletics at BB&N – like all BB&N programs – embody the core values of the school. Athletic competition enables students to practice integrity, to achieve personal growth, to assume responsibility, to learn the lessons taught by victory and defeat, and to give their very best efforts while working together as members of a team toward a shared goal.
    • 88. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com BB&N Integrated Communications The Big Idea: BB&N = “Messy vitality”
    • 89. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com BB&N Integrated Communications Capture the energy and vitality of learning at BB&N • Use a louder voice and more aggressive tone than in the past • Use bold documentary-style photography to show engaged interaction – teachers and students, students and students – to show that learning is a contact sport • Use typography and language to communicate a smart and spirited confidence about ideas • Capture the Cambridge intellectual vibe – and not just through pictures of the surroundings
    • 90. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com BB&N Integrated Communications Communicate the compassionate and supportive nature of BB&N, but in ways that don’t compromise the high standards of performance. • The imagery and language for the Lower School convey a warm and supportive environment without being cloyingly sweet. (Not every child needs to be smiling.) • Show small groups of kids studying together or socializing in each of the campuses or at Harvard Square. • Show the diversity of the student population in all settings.
    • 91. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com BB&N Integrated Communications Leverage what is unique about BB&N. Avoid making it look like just another New England prep school. • Showcase its distinctive characteristics, such as the Cambridge location and “urban vibe,” the three campuses, and the the traditions, such as Bivouac, the Senior Tiles, etc. • Celebrate difference in people, ideas, interests – allow the school’s eclectic, creative, at-times quirky nature to show through. • Address the issue of character-building subtly. (“We don’t teach character, we model it.”) rather than explicitly. (“At XYZ School we build strong character in all our students.”)
    • 92. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com BB&N Integrated Communications 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com
    • 93. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com BB&N Integrated Communications 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com
    • 94. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com BB&N Integrated Communications 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com
    • 95. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com BB&N Integrated Communications 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com
    • 96. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com BB&N Integrated Communications 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com
    • 97. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com BB&N Integrated Communications 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com
    • 98. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Mendoza School of Business
    • 99. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com University of Notre Dame - Mendoza College of Business School: · Business school serves undergraduate, MBA, executive education, Master and non-degree programs Target Audiences: · Primary: Business leaders with an altruistic approach Assignment: · Branding, messaging and Web site Strategy: · Differentiate the business school by focusing on the core of Notre Dame
    • 100. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Mendoza Recommendations: Message + Faculty leadership (research, hosting conferences) Teaching problem solving skills Students have a love of learning Transforming/developing the individual End benefit to change the world Closeness to faculty Values based problem solving Ethics integral to offerings Notre Dame network (passionate/large) Methodology/curriculum = Messaging Strategy: Merge Parity with Positive Differentiation
    • 101. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Mendoza Recommendations: Message Mendoza’s Golden Thread: Educating people who will make the world better through business.
    • 102. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Case Study: Mendoza College of Business 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com
    • 103. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Case Study: Mendoza College of Business at Notre Dame
    • 104. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Mendoza College of Business: Before 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com
    • 105. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Case Study: Mendoza College of Business 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com
    • 106. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Case Study: Mendoza College of Business 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com
    • 107. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Case Study: Mendoza College of Business 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com
    • 108. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Case Study: Mendoza College of Business 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com
    • 109. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com The Pike School Goal: Reposition the Pike brand as a “traditionally progressive” place of learning Assignment: · Design a visual identifier and a Web site that serves as a common element and cornerstone for all communications Target Audiences and Markets: · Primary: Parents, staff/faculty, alumni/ae, students · Secondary: Trustees, donors, media Communications Objectives: · Represent Pike as an educational institution · Symbolize the blend between traditional/progressive · Communicate accessible/inclusive · Standardize “Pike Green”
    • 110. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Pike - Before
    • 111. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Pike - Logo Directions
    • 112. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Pike - New Identity
    • 113. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Pike - Web site 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com
    • 114. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Pike - Campaign Name and Identity
    • 115. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com The Boston Museum · Business: · An incipient cultural institution in the heart of the Rose Kennedy Greenway celebrating Boston essential role in the American narrative. · Target Audiences and Markets: · Primary: Individual donors, policy makers, corporate donors · Secondary: Everybody · Assignment: · Branding, messaging & tagline, logo, identity, collateral and interactive video kiosk. Strategy: · Create verbal and visual language to position and promote the Museum.
    • 116. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com The Boston Museum · Core · Boston, the nation and the world · Personality · Relevant, multi-faceted, welcoming, exciting · Key Messages · Bold and memorable · Promise · The Boston Museum is a new breed of cultural institution that will explore the making and re-making of the American identity through Boston’s incomparable history.
    • 117. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com The Boston Museum Message Map 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com
    • 118. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com The Boston Museum 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com
    • 119. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com The Boston Museum 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com
    • 120. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com The Boston Museum Story Kiosk, Boston 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com
    • 121. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com The Boston Museum Story Kiosk, Boston 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com
    • 122. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Boston Museum Story Kiosk, Boston 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com
    • 123. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com SUMMARY
    • 124. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com 9 Things To Do Now 1. Start now. Don’t wait until numbers are down. 2. Develop Your Plan. Use old school and new school communications. 3. Identify Your Target Audience (who, what, where, how). Find Your North Stars. 4. Figure Out Your Brand. What’s Your Story? 5. Crystallize Your Message. Can you say in an elevator ride? 6. Create Your Verbal and Visual Dialogue. Remember to socialize your brand. 7. Work Your Plan in Stages. You don’t need to launch all at once. 8. Evaluate Metrics to see what’s working. Look, Listen and Refine. 9. Don’t Stop Now. Keep working it.
    • 125. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com EXERCISE and HANDOUT
    • 126. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com
    • 127. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com
    • 128. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com
    • 129. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com
    • 130. 2009 Corey McPherson Nash | Proprietary Content | For more information, email info@corey.com Thank you! · http://www.corey.com · http://twitter.com/cmntweets · http://www.facebook.com/coreymcphersonnash · http://www.corey.com/flickr