Aesthetic Problem: What constitutes the            aesthetic of a sweet kitsch?   References: Kathleen Higgins, “Sweet Kit...
 Characterization of a sweet kitsch and  consideration of some suggested accounts of  the effects sweet kitsch has on the...
(English  pronunciation: /ˈ  kɪtʃ/, loanword from German)-characterized as a form of “really bad taste”, “an  incarnation ...
 Kitsch       became defined as an aesthetically impoverished object of shoddy production, meant more to identify the con...
kitsch example of late 19th centurypopular lithograph of a humorouspainting by Frederick Dielman.
Sacriligious kitsch arts
-art that appeals unsubstly and  unapologetically to the softer “sweeter”  sentiments (Solomon, 1991)-evokes emotions of t...
Question:
Question:
 1.   Sweet kitsch makes the world sweeter and excludes what is intolerable 2.   Sweet kitsch provides easy, effortless ...
If the greeting card is effective, we identify with the couple wandering in nature. Whatwe enjoy is certainly not some oth...
At the time we see the ad. We are inlove, and are immediately stimulated       to think beyond the ad to      practicality...
Issue:
 Important  social concerns Presence of popularity of kitsch in modern  life They are often mentioned as paradigm  inst...
   kitsch criticism is based on Immanuel Kant’s    philosophy of aesthetics.   Kant describes the direct appeal to the s...
 “Kitsch is mechanical and operated by  formulas” “Kitsch pretends to demand nothing of its  customers except their mone...
 “True  art is good. Kitsch is evil” Accuses kitsch of not participating in the  development of art Kitsch involved try...
 Concludes that kitsch is thus more reflective than simple enjoyment in that it detaches itself from the original emotion...
Question:
 Sweet  kitsch can be used for propagandistic  purposes-it exploits the human capacity to respond to  an image as an “ico...
 “Artis supposed to be subjective, challenging and oriented against the oppressiveness of the power structure
Question:
 Withthe emergence of postmodernism in the 1980s, the borders between kitsch and high art again became blurred
Question:
 Kitsch is rather light hearted enterprise that  tends to make our world somewhat more  charming if we are not put off by...
For us, for young artists:
Question:
    As a result of this redefinition proposed by    Nerdrum, an increasing number of figurative painters    are referring...
Reality:
Sweet Kitsch
Sweet Kitsch
Sweet Kitsch
Sweet Kitsch
Sweet Kitsch
Sweet Kitsch
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Sweet Kitsch

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A report on the aesthetic problem of a Sweet Kitsch art.

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  • Knock knock! Who’s there? Kitsch. Kitsch who? Wag mo kong kurutin diyan, masaKITSCHen eh.
  • -cannot be defined from a single vantage point-it is subjected to different kinds of objections for artists –there is a sheer technical incompetenece the for ignorance of the medium, the tradition and its history, the current fashions and the tastes of time -”no-eye” (the failure to understand a color and composition) “bad art”aesthetic form of lying aesthetic ideal of all politicians and all political parties and movements (Kundera) Excessive sentimentality often is associated with the term.loanword from German)
  • Exaggerated sentimentality and melodrama
  • With the emergence of postmodernism in the 1980s, the borders between kitsch and high art again became blurred
  • -in a broad sense, Swee Kitsch is often characterized by sweet nothings, “cute”, “charming”-representational image to be essential to ascribing sweetness or inspirational quality to the kitsch response -effective kitsch that commemorates motherhood evokes the “kitsch” -effective kitsch that inspires patrionism evokes the “sweet kitsch”
  • Intolerable- impossible to deal or bear with Catharsis –the process of expressing strong feelings that have been affecting you so that they do not upset you anymoreAphrodisiac- a food, drink, or drug that makes people want to have sex4.) Sweet kitsch functions to provoke a response. It integrates several of the suggested accounts of the sweet kitsch effec
  • -In enjoying sweet kitsch, one enjoys, not the object but one’s own state of mind -it is the essential move that constitutes kitsch
  • Sweet Kitsch

    1. 1. Aesthetic Problem: What constitutes the aesthetic of a sweet kitsch? References: Kathleen Higgins, “Sweet Kitsch” Anthony Savile, “Sentimentality Robert Solomon “On Kitsch and Sentimentality”
    2. 2.  Characterization of a sweet kitsch and consideration of some suggested accounts of the effects sweet kitsch has on the observer who appreciates it Discuss the charges that have been raised against sweet kitsch as a social and political evil Question of what makes kitsch-objects kitsch Conclude what constitutes the aesthetic of a sweet kitsch
    3. 3. (English pronunciation: /ˈ kɪtʃ/, loanword from German)-characterized as a form of “really bad taste”, “an incarnation of evil”... (Higgins)-art, objects, or design considered to be in poor taste because of excessive garishness or sentimentality, but appreciated in an ironic way (Webster dictionary) -purely for commercial purposes rather than works created as self-expression by an artist (Wikipedia)- unacceptable in human experience/ existence- it resists precise definition (Calinescu)
    4. 4.  Kitsch became defined as an aesthetically impoverished object of shoddy production, meant more to identify the consumer with a newly acquired class status than to invoke a genuine aesthetic response. In this sense, the word eventually came to mean "a slapping together" (of a work of art)
    5. 5. kitsch example of late 19th centurypopular lithograph of a humorouspainting by Frederick Dielman.
    6. 6. Sacriligious kitsch arts
    7. 7. -art that appeals unsubstly and unapologetically to the softer “sweeter” sentiments (Solomon, 1991)-evokes emotions of the “touching” or “stirring” sorts (Kathleen Higgins)-suitably described as “touching” or “inspirational” by an appreciative observer
    8. 8. Question:
    9. 9. Question:
    10. 10.  1. Sweet kitsch makes the world sweeter and excludes what is intolerable 2. Sweet kitsch provides easy, effortless catharsis 3. Sweet kitsch serves as an aphrodisiac, a means of self-enjoyment 4. Sweet kitsch reassures its audience
    11. 11. If the greeting card is effective, we identify with the couple wandering in nature. Whatwe enjoy is certainly not some other people having a lovely time in love, but our own potential lovely times in love. 
    12. 12. At the time we see the ad. We are inlove, and are immediately stimulated to think beyond the ad to practicality: “I’ll buy somechampagne before my date with Paul tomorrow night”
    13. 13. Issue:
    14. 14.  Important social concerns Presence of popularity of kitsch in modern life They are often mentioned as paradigm instances of “bad art” Its sentimentality and its virtues For some artists, the best emotions seem to be the worst emotions “better shocking or sour than sweet?” The art world of the time perceived the immense popularity of kitsch as a threat to culture
    15. 15.  kitsch criticism is based on Immanuel Kant’s philosophy of aesthetics. Kant describes the direct appeal to the senses as "barbaric“ As an effect of these aesthetics, working with emotional and "unmodern" or "archetypical" motifs was referred to as kitsch from the second half of the 19th century on. Kitsch is thus seen as "false As Thomas Kulka writes, "the term kitsch was originally applied exclusively to paintings", but it soon spread to other disciplines, such as music. The term has been applied to painters, such as Ilya Repin, composers, such as Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, whom Herman Broch refers to as "genialischer kitsch", or "kitsch of genius
    16. 16.  “Kitsch is mechanical and operated by formulas” “Kitsch pretends to demand nothing of its customers except their money—not even their time”
    17. 17.  “True art is good. Kitsch is evil” Accuses kitsch of not participating in the development of art Kitsch involved trying to achieve “beauty” instead of “truth” Any attempt to make something beautiful would lead to kitsch Ex: Avant-Garde and Kitsch (arose in order to defend aesthetic standards from the decline of taste involved in consumer society)
    18. 18.  Concludes that kitsch is thus more reflective than simple enjoyment in that it detaches itself from the original emotion in order to enjoy it
    19. 19. Question:
    20. 20.  Sweet kitsch can be used for propagandistic purposes-it exploits the human capacity to respond to an image as an “icon”- “categorial agreement” with the being- It can provide a sugar-coated for virtually any kind of ideology The art is controlled and formulated by the needs of the market and given to a passive population which accepts it
    21. 21.  “Artis supposed to be subjective, challenging and oriented against the oppressiveness of the power structure
    22. 22. Question:
    23. 23.  Withthe emergence of postmodernism in the 1980s, the borders between kitsch and high art again became blurred
    24. 24. Question:
    25. 25.  Kitsch is rather light hearted enterprise that tends to make our world somewhat more charming if we are not put off by its ridiculousness (Lyell Henry) Sweetening of life is the fundamental aim of sweet kitsch Evil attitudes toward kitsch take it to be socially harmful The problem lies in our poor opinion of the emotions in general and in particular, the “softer” sentiments It should be guarded more against the superficial understanding of sweet kitsch than against it
    26. 26. For us, for young artists:
    27. 27. Question:
    28. 28.  As a result of this redefinition proposed by Nerdrum, an increasing number of figurative painters are referring to themselves as "kitsch painters" and members of The Kitsch Movement they downplayed the formal structure of the artwork in favor of elements that enter it by relating to other spheres of life. Despite this, many in the art world continue to adhere to some sense of the dichotomy between art and kitsch, excluding all sentimental and ”realistic” art from being considered seriously. This has come under attack by critics, who argue for a renewed appreciation of academic art and traditional figurative painting, without the concern for it appearing innovative or new.
    29. 29. Reality:

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