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Future reserves 2020 - consultation response
 

Future reserves 2020 - consultation response

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    Future reserves 2020 - consultation response Future reserves 2020 - consultation response Document Transcript

    • Response to Ministry of Defence consultation on “Future Reserves 2020:Delivering the Nation’s Security Together”Submission from the Chartered Management InstituteJanuary 2013Contact:Philippa TuckerPublic Affairs Managerphilippa.tucker@managers.org.ukTel: 020 7421 2723
    • Executive summary:  CMI welcomes the Ministry of Defence’s proposals for improving and managing the relationship between employers and military reserves. We hope that the proposals contained in the Green Paper will make it easier for employees to become reserves, and for employers to manage their staff’s absences and training commitments, and thereby retain talented staff  We agree that in order for reserve numbers to increase, clearer rules need to be put in place to encourage skilled civilians to volunteer, and to encourage organisations, large and small, to employ and value such reservists  We also welcome the proposal that reservists’ skills gained as part of their training and deployment with the armed forces should be professionally accredited. This will help individuals to demonstrate the value to their organisation of their military service, and will enable employers to upskill their staff at no extra cost to themselves. However, training will be valued by employers only if it benefits the company. Many employers, particularly SMEs, will be extremely reluctant to release employees to attending training programmes which are of no benefit to the employer  We also suggest that military reservists who gain professional leadership and management qualifications, or who have management experience, consider becoming a Chartered Manager, as this demonstrates both their impact in the workplace and their commitment to professionalising their management skills
    • About CMICMI is responding to this call for evidence as the UK’s only chartered professional body for managementand leadership. With 90,000 members across all sectors of the economy, we represent managers fromfirst line managers to the most senior levels of business and public sector organisations. We prideourselves on taking best practice from a range of sectors and delivering professional leadership andmanagement skills advice, products and services.During 2011 nearly 8,000 members of the armed forces took CMI-accredited qualifications at our networkof 600 Approved Centres, which range from military establishments such as the Defence Academy of theUK, world-class universities, technical colleges, employers and further education institutes.CMI has 11 Ministry of Defence (MoD) Approved Centres which deliver career development trainingcomprised of approximately 50 courses at 65 different venues across the UK, and abroad. Thesecourses are accredited against CMI Qualifications Credit Framework (QCF) registered qualifications,which are quality-assurance tested by CMI moderators.CMI welcomes the opportunity to comment on the MoD’s plans for increasing the number of reservists.We have set out below specific comments relating to the consultation document proposals, and haveanswered the questions which we feel we are in a position to comment on.Section 3 – Relationships with Employers  Managing absence from the workplaceOne significant difference between reserves and employees taking maternity or paternity leave is therelatively short notice that employers may be given when reserves are deployed. The consultation paperstates that the shortest notice an employer could be given would be one month, although under normalcircumstance it would be around three months. However, this is still a short time to plan for theemployee’s absence, compared with maternity or paternity leave, when the employer usually hasbetween 4 and 6 months’ notice, sometimes longer. SMEs in particularly will find it hard to lose a memberof staff for such periods, particularly if that person is highly skilled and hard to replace.  Defence proposition for employersQuestion 12: the sentiment expressed by the Department is good, but there is insufficient detail in thedocument to be able to answer question 12 meaningfully. Annex C (Working example of Employers’Charter for Reservists) demonstrates a strong commitment to supporting reservists, but it is unclear howMoD will publicise this document and encourage employers to sign up to it.  Non-financial incentives (Question 22)Whilst we agree that recognition should be given to employers who employ and support reservists, wewould question the need for a separate “kitemark” type award, and suggest that the MoD considersincorporating such recognition into existing schemes such as Investors in People (IIP). A proliferation of“kitemarks” could become confusing for both employers and employees, and the principle of recognisingemployers for supporting and developing their staff is already successfully covered by establishedbrands, such as IIP. For those organisations which do not currently hold Investors in People but qualifyfor the reservist “kitemark”, this would give them an incentive to achieve IIP or similar.  Question 23 – Do you agree with our assessment of the potential value and benefits that members of the Reserve Forces bring to their organisation? If not, what are the reasons for your view?We agree with the MoD’s assessment of the potential value that reservists bring to their organisation, andwould particularly underline para. 3.19 which states: “In all cases, the reservist develops significantleadership, people management and initiative skills, which benefit the civilian employer” and commentfurther on this point below.
    •  Our aspirations for skills developmentPara 3.25 – accreditation:CMI is already providing Management and Leadership qualifications to MOD serving and reservistpersonnel of all ranks through a number of CMI Approved Centres which deliver career development. Fulldetails are set out at Annex 1. Briefly, CMI is involved in accrediting reservist training at the DefenceAcademy of the United Kingdom, RN Leadership Academy Collingwood, the Royal Marines CommandoTraining Centre Lympstone, the Directorate of Education and Training Services (Army), the Royal MilitaryAcademy Sandhurst and RAF College Cranwell.The benefits of accredited leadership and management development were explored in CMI’s researchreport, “The Value of Management and Leadership Qualifications” (CMI, July 2012), which found thataccredited leadership and management development had helped individuals improve their performanceat work; make lasting changes to the way they manage and lead; and that 81 per cent of managers wereable to pass on their new skills to others, leading to enhanced team performance.Our research report, “The Business Benefits of Management and Leadership Development” (CMI,February 2012) also demonstrated the correlation between investing in management and leadershipdevelopment and improving individual and organisational performance. The research results showed thatinvesting in management and leadership development can improve people performance by as much as32 per cent, and overall organisational performance by as much as 23 per cent.These findings demonstrate clearly that, in answer to question 24, (which asks about the value ofaccrediting reservist training), accrediting the leadership and management skills gained by reservistswould certainly be of value to employees and employers alike.Commercial Awareness. A key element of MOD training and education strategy is the recognition,through recognised standards, that skill sets and competencies developed throughout a military career arereadily transportable to civilian employment. CMI accredited qualifications are completely aligned to thisMOD aspiration, in that CMI has never developed qualifications that specifically relate to military skills thathave no place in the civilian workplace. All CMI management and leadership qualifications accredited toMOD career development (reserves included) do not refer to the title of the service training or its venue. Inthis way, employers are assured that the qualifications gained are the same as those gained in the civilianemployment sector, rather than being specific to the armed forces.Links to Academia. We recognise that a degree is often not enough in the modern workplace, and thatemployers seek people who also have proven workplace skills such as team working, leadership,communications etc. CMI’s Level 5 Awards in Leadership have proved popular with universities as well ascollocated MOD officer cadet organisations (eg. University Royal Naval Units; Army University OfficerTraining Corps, and RAF University Air Squadrons). The CMI’s awarding body constantly strives toachieve greater synergy between academic and vocational achievement through progressions andexemptions against certain university programmes, and close collaboration with civilian employers indeveloping qualifications.Chartered ManagerWe would also suggest that employees who have gained a professional management qualification, orwho have at least three years’ management experience, consider becoming a Chartered Manager. This isthe hallmark of a professional manager, and allows individuals to demonstrate the impact of theirprofessional management skills in the workplace. To date we have approximately 250 CharteredManagers from the armed forces, and some of these will undoubtedly serve on operational deployments,such as in Afghanistan. Chartered Manager is a very popular award for military and ex-military personnel,as demonstrated by the national Chartered Manager of the Year 2012, Andrew Knott (currently talentmanagement director at NALCO) who won this prestigious title for his leadership during his militaryservice as former Commanding Officer No 2 Signals Regiment. During the 2012 competition there weretwo other military nominees for this award.CMI, January 2013
    • Annex 1 – CMI accredited qualifications delivered to the Armed Forces andReservists, in the UK and abroadREGULAR FORCES ACCREDITATIONThe Defence Academy of the UK (Watchfield)  Higher Command Staff Course: level 8 diploma in Strategic Direction and Leadership (74 QCF credits)  Advanced Command and staff Course: level 7 diploma in Strategic Management and Leadership (104 QCF credits)  Intermediate Command and Staff Course: level 7 diploma in Strategic Management and Leadership (70-77 QCF credits)  Defence Academy Directing Staff Workshops: level 5 award / certificate / diploma in Management Coaching and Mentoring  Cranfield University Vincent Centre certificate and diploma in ConsultancyRoyal Navy and Royal Marines Centres:  Britannia Royal Naval College Dartmouth: level 5 certificate in Management and Leadership (36 QCF credits)  Royal Naval Leadership Academy Collingwood (Fareham):qualifications ranging between level 2 diploma in Team Leading to level 6 certificates in management and Leadership and level 5 certificates in management Coaching and Mentoring  Royal Marines Commando Training Centre (Lympstone): qualifications ranging between level 2 diploma in Team Leading to level 5 diploma in Management and Leadership and level 5 certificate / diploma in Management Coaching and MentoringArmy:  Royal Military Academy Sandhurst: level 5 and level 7 certificate in Management and Leadership  HQ Army and HQ Directorate Educational Training Services (Army) (Andover) which commands approximately 30 delivery points at Army Arms and Services Schools and Education Centres throughout the UK, Germany, Canada, Afghanistan, and Cyprus: qualifications ranging between level 2 diploma in Team Leading to level 7 certificate in Management and Leadership and level 5 awards in Management Coaching and MentoringRoyal Air Force:  Officer and Aircrew Training Units at Royal Air Force College Cranwell: qualifications ranging from level 4 certificate in Management and Leadership to level 6 certificate in Management and Leadership and level 5 awards / certificates in Management Coaching and Mentoring  Airmen’s Command Squadron (RAF Halton): qualifications ranging between level 2 diploma in Team Leading to level 5 certificate in Management and Leadership and level 5 award / certificate in level 5 Management Coaching and MentoringEXTANT RESERVE FORCES ACCREDITATION UK Defence Academy  Advanced Command and Staff Course (Reserve): level 7 certificate in Strategic Management and Leadership (31 QCF credits)
    • Royal Navy and Royal Marines:  RN Reserve Senior Rates Leadership Course: level 3 certificate in First Line Management (36 QCF credits)  RN Reserve Leading Rate Leadership Course: level 2 diploma in Team Leading (43 QCF credits) plus a level 3 certificate in First Line management (25 QCF credits)  RM Reserve Senior Command Course: level 3 certificate in First Line Management (42 QCF credits) plus level 5 certificate in management and Leadership (21 QCF credits)  RM Reserve Junior Command Course: level 2 certificate in Team Leading (37 QCF credits) plus level 3 certificate in First Line Management (13 QCF credits) Army:  Royal Military Academy Sandhurst Territorial Army Commissioning Course: level 5 certificate in Management and Leadership (20 QCF credits)  Royal Military Academy Sandhurst Territorial Army Late Entry Commissioning Course: level 7 certificate in Strategic Management and Leadership (25 QCF credits) Royal Air Force:  UK Defence Academy (Watchfield) Intermediate Command and Staff Course (Air): level 7 certificate in Strategic Management and Leadership (31 QCF credits)  Reserve Officers Initial Training (Cranwell): level 5 certificate in management and Leadership (26 QCF credits)RESERVE FORCES ACCREDITATION IN DEVELOPMENT Royal Fleet Auxiliary  CMI is working with senior training managers of the Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA) to investigate accreditation of management and leadership aspects of current RFA training delivered at Maritime Colleges throughout the UK and currently accredited by the Merchant Navy Training Board Army  Intermediate Command and Staff Course (Land Reserve)  CMI is currently engaged with HQ Army and HQ DETS(A) working on the accreditation of Reserve Army Non-Commissioned Officer and Warrant Officer Command, Leadership, and Management (CLM) courses Royal Air Force  CMI is investigating accreditation of RAF Reserve recruit training.