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Modified Adult Learning Principles workshop
 

Modified Adult Learning Principles workshop

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A timeless presentation originally crafted in 2009 exploring how to cut through the theory of adult learning and provide real practical lessons.

A timeless presentation originally crafted in 2009 exploring how to cut through the theory of adult learning and provide real practical lessons.

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    Modified Adult Learning Principles workshop Modified Adult Learning Principles workshop Presentation Transcript

    • Adult Learning Principles: From Theory to Practice
    • Adult Learning Principles: MADLIBS
      • Name 3 places you would love to be
      • Name 3 places you have been in the past 24 hours
      • Theory is to practice like: is to
    • Purpose of the CME Professional
      • To induce positive changes in:
        • Knowledge
        • Attitude
        • Skills
        • Behavior
        • Outcomes
      • Clinician’s learning should allow them to think differently and to act differently
    • Adult Learning Principles: Theory Suggests That Education Should
      • Allow learners to identify their own learning goals and direct their education
      • Relate to learners' current experiences
      • Enable learners to be active contributors to their learning
      • Provide support to engaged learners
      • Allow learners to observe the faculty role-model behaviors
      • Allow learners to practice what they learn
      • Allow learners to receive feedback from teachers and/or peers
      • Allow learners to reflect on their learning
    • Adult Learning Principles: Theory Suggests That Education Should
      • Allow learners to identify their own learning goals and direct their education
      • Relate to learners' current experiences
      • Enable learners to be active contributors to their learning
      • Provide support to engaged learners
      • Allow learners to observe the faculty role-model behaviors
      • Allow learners to practice what they learn
      • Allow learners to receive feedback from teachers and/or peers
      • Allow learners to reflect on their learning
      Self Direction Active Modeling Feedback Practice Reflection
    • Adult Learning Principles: Theory Suggests That Education Should
      • Allow learners to identify their own learning goals and direct their education
      • Relate to learners' current experiences
      • Enable learners to be active contributors to their learning
      • Provide support to engaged learners
      • Allow learners to observe the faculty role-model behaviors
      • Allow learners to practice what they learn
      • Allow learners to receive feedback from teachers and/or peers
      • Allow learners to reflect on their learning
      Self Direction Active Modeling Feedback Practice Reflection 1 2 3 5 4 6
    • Adult Learning Principles: Theory in Practice
      • Self Direction
      • Active
      • Modeling
      • Practice
      • Feedback
      • Reflection
      Predispose Enable Endure
    • ALPs in Practice: Self Direction
      • Motivation :
      • Social relationships: to make new friends, to meet a need for associations and friendships.
      • External expectations: to fulfill the expectations or recommendations of someone with formal authority.
      • Social welfare: to improve ability to serve mankind, prepare for service to the community, and improve ability to participate in community work.
      • Personal advancement: to achieve higher status in a job, secure professional advancement, and stay abreast of competitors.
      • Escape/Stimulation: to relieve boredom, provide a break in the routine of home or work, and provide a contrast to other exacting details of life.
      • Cognitive interest: to learn for the sake of learning, seek knowledge for its own sake, and to satisfy an inquiring mind.
      http://honolulu.hawaii.edu/intranet/committees/FacDevCom/guidebk/teachtip/adults-2.htm 2 3 4 5 6 1
    • ALPs in Practice: Self Direction
      • Pure self-directed learning is largely out of our control
      • For the vast majority of what we do the needs assessment is our attempt at self-directed education
        • A good NA is the strongest predictor to successful activities
        • National needs for national initiatives
        • Remember: knowledge is national, action is local
      2 3 4 5 6 1
    • ALPs in Practice: Self Direction
      • What does the universe of ‘selfs’ need to know?
        • Mind the gaps
        • Explore the barriers
        • Identify the needs
      • How does the universe of ‘selfs’ learn?
        • When are our learners able to learn?
        • How do our learners prefer to learn?
        • Where do our learners go to learn?
      2 3 4 5 6 1
    • ALPs in Practice: ? Self Direction ?
      • … while learners may express a desire to be self-directed in their learning, most lack the required understanding of learning necessary to be self-directed.
      • … learners indicated a desire for clear instructions regarding how to complete assignments as well as precise information from the course facilitator about which assignments would be graded.
      • … the notion of self-directed learning [is] ignorant of issues of power and inequality within educational settings and society as a whole.
      • … self-directed learning as a goal that may be desired but not necessarily practical to attain (Schapiro, 2003).
      Blondy LC. (2007). www.ncolr.org/jiol/issues/PDF/6.2.3.pdf; Cheren, M. (1983). Helping adults learn how to learn . ; Robinson, R. (1992). Research in Distance Education. 4 (1), 10-13.; Schapiro, S. A. (2003).]. Journal of Transformative Education, 1 (2), 150-166. 2 3 4 5 6 1
    • ALPs in Practice: Active
      • Rational:
        • We assume that learning is a rational, intellectual activity
      • Relational:
        • Humans are social beings
      • Emotional:
        • Acknowledge that emotions aid the learning process
      • Physical:
        • Learning can be enhanced by engaging the senses
      • Metaphoric:
        • Learning is enhanced through symbols and devices
      1 Accessible vs Accurate 3 4 5 6 2
    • ALPs in Practice: Modeling Amount Learned and Retained* Lecture Moderated Case Study Preceptorship Reading 1 4 5 6 2 3 *Cocktail napkin data
    • ALPs in Practice: Practice ARS- Driven Case Simulation-Based Education Apprenticeship Paper and Pencil 1 5 6 2 3 4 Amount Learned and Retained* *Cocktail napkin data
    • ALPs in Practice: Feedback Peer Comparisons Mentoring Answers in the Footer WRONG!! (Ha-Ha!) 1 6 2 3 4 5 Amount Learned and Retained* *Cocktail napkin data
    • ALPs in Practice: Reflection 1-off 1-off + 1 reminder 1-off + 1 f/u activity Sequential, Progressive Curriculum T2 6 wks T4 T3 1 2 3 4 5 6 Amount Learned and Retained* *Cocktail napkin data
    • ALPs in Practice: Reflection 1-off 1-off + 1 reminder 1-off + 1 f/u activity Sequential, Progressive Curriculum T2 6 wks T4 T3 1 2 3 4 5 6 Amount Learned and Retained* *Cocktail napkin data
    • Bad Elements of Educational Design
    • Educational Design Gone Bad
      • Of the 10000 activities currently on the site, more than 400 deal with sleep medicine . This saturation suggests that there is a lot of interest in sleep education on our site.
      • Approximately 4-6 months after the live activity a 24-page monograph will be published as an enduring activity.
    • Educational Design Gone Bad
      • The planned activity will consist of a Chair-conceived agenda and program that must be submitted 10-12 months prior to the live event. The live event will last ~3.5 hours and should include 4 or 5 lectures. Planners must meet the arbitrary faculty inclusion criteria. The exact criteria will be announced after the proposal has been accepted. To ensure interactivity, the use of ARS is mandatory.
    • Good Elements of Educational Design
    • Educational Design Gone Good: Part I
      • A Community of Practice is organized
      • Participants are asked to create and document both short-term and long-term goals
      • An outcomes database is engineered and all participants are required to systematically evaluate their progress
      • A calendar of events is developed and published
      • Participants are expected to attend a live activities no less frequently than monthly
      • Live activities are typically ½ day programs with 80-120 members of the Community of Practice
    • Educational Design Gone Good: Part II
      • One-two hours before a live event, simulation exercises are made available to all participants
      • Each live activities formally begins with a brief refresher of prior activities (10-15 minutes)
      • Following the brief refresher, participants break out into assigned 4-person, small working groups
      • Each of the small working groups is phased through an identical series of problem-based cases
      • Each case is attended to for 15-20 minutes
      • Feedback is provided throughout the activity
    • Educational Design Gone Good: Part III
      • At the conclusion of the small working group, problem-based cases, each group prioritizes the most salient lessons of the day
      • When all of the small working groups have completed their debrief the larger Community of Practice is reconvened
      • During the final, end-of-day session a member from each group is called upon to recount the highlights of the small working groups
      • This end-of-day session allows for feedback to be provided by the larger group
    • Educational Design Gone Good: Part IV
      • The Community of Practice has an established password-protected web component:
        • Highlights of each live activity are described
        • Results are posted
        • All scheduling and working group planning can be disseminated
        • Activity reports are published
        • Each participant can track his or her performance against his or her short-term or long-term goals
        • Aggregate performance of the Community of Practice can we tracked
        • Needs of the Community of Practice can be democratically course corrected as necessary
    • Simplify ALPs in Practice
      • Predispose
      • Enable
      • Endure
      Self Direction Active Modeling Practice Feedback Reflection Allow learners to identify their own learning goals and direct their education Relate to learners' current experiences Enable learners to be active contributors to their learning Provide support to engaged learners Allow learners to observe the faculty role-model behaviors Allow learners to practice what they learn Allow learners to receive feedback from teachers and/or peers Allow learners to reflect on their learning
    • Questions and Comments