Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Plankton Station
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Plankton Station

1,862
views

Published on

Learn how to teach the Plankton Station aboard the Schoolship and how to identify live zooplankton.

Learn how to teach the Plankton Station aboard the Schoolship and how to identify live zooplankton.

Published in: Education

0 Comments
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,862
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
98
Comments
0
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Transcript

    • 1. INLAND SEAS EDUCATION ASSOCIATION “ Protecting the Great Lakes through Education” Plankton Station
    • 2. Plankton Station Learning Objectives
      • Identify the collection device used to sample plankton.
      • Define phytoplankton as suspended plants & zooplankton as suspended animals.
      • Recognize plankton as the basis of the aquatic food web.
      • Describe the trophic (feeding) relationships among phytoplankton, zooplankton, & fish.
      • Identify zooplankton seen on the video monitor & record their findings.
      Students will be able to:
    • 3. Plankton
      • Plankton are microscopic plants & animals that are free-floating or suspended in the water
    • 4. Plankton Plant plankton Animal plankton = Phytoplankton = Zooplankton
    • 5. Plankton
      • Plankton are the basis of the aquatic food web
    • 6. What is a Food Web?
      • A food web describes the feeding relationships between different organisms
    • 7. Feeding Relationships
      • Producers: organisms that produce their own food through photosynthesis using sunlight & nutrients
      • Consumers: organisms that cannot produce their own food (need to consume another organism to obtain energy)
      • Decomposers: organisms that break down organic material
    • 8. The Great Lakes Food Web SUN Zooplankton Large Fish (Piscivores) Phytoplankton Forage Fish Benthos Detritus
    • 9.  
    • 10. Contaminants in the Great Lakes Food Web Source: EPA Great Lakes National Program Office
    • 11. Bioaccumulation
      • Bioaccumulation refers to the accumulation of contaminants in the tissues of organisms
      • Many contaminants are hydrophobic (they prefer to be in the lipids/fats of an organism rather than in water) & are taken up in the fatty tissues of organisms
    • 12. Bioconcentration Source: EPA Great Lakes National Program Office
    • 13.  
    • 14. Diel vertical migration Shallow waters at night Deep waters during the day … in response to changing light intensity
      • Why?
        • Metabloic advantage
        • Predator avoidance
    • 15.  
    • 16.  
    • 17.  
    • 18.  
    • 19.  
    • 20. Logistics
      • Check to make sure the micro-video system is working
      • Begin by discussing how the plankton were collected, where plankton fit into the food web, etc.
      • Students put several drops of the sample on a petri dish (the smaller the better)
      • Since the boat & plankton are moving & this station is below deck, students may get seasick
        • Let the lead instructor know & they will take the student on deck for a break
    • 21.  
    • 22. COPEPODS Calanoid Copepod Cyclopoid Copepod
    • 23. Source: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory Calanoid Copepod
    • 24. Cyclopoid Copepods Sources: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory
    • 25. Sources: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory
    • 26. Harpacticoid Copepod Source: USGS Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database
    • 27. Copepod nauplius/nauplii COPEPODS
    • 28. Copepod nauplius Source: Micrographia
    • 29. CLADOCERANS Bosmina Daphnia
    • 30. Bosmina Source: Central Michigan University
    • 31. Daphnia Sources: Advancing the Science of Limnology and Oceanography (left); NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (right)
    • 32. CLADOCERANS Chydorus
    • 33. Chydorus Source: Central Michigan University
    • 34. Leptodora CLADOCERANS Polyphemus Source: Central Michigan University
    • 35. ROTIFERS Asplanchna Keratella Colonial Rotifer
    • 36. Asplanchna Source: Micrographia
    • 37. Keratella Source: Advancing the Science of Limnology and Oceanography
    • 38. Colonial rotifer
    • 39. MYSIDS Mysis relicta (opossum shrimp)
    • 40. Mysis relicta Source: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory
    • 41. EXOTIC SPECIES Bythotrephes longiramus (spiny water flea)
    • 42. Source: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory Bythotrephes
    • 43. EXOTIC SPECIES Cercopagis pengoi (fish hook water flea)
    • 44. Cercopagis Bythotrephes Source: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory
    • 45. ZEBRA MUSSELS Veliger Adult Source: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (right)
    • 46. Zebra mussel veliger Source: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory
    • 47. Bloody Red Shrimp Hemimysis anomala Source: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory
    • 48. Seasonal Succession of Zooplankton Abundance May June July Aug
    • 49. Plankton Net 30 C A A R
    • 50. The Plankton Station
    • 51. Sources
      • Advancing the Science of Limnology and Oceanography ( http://www.aslo.org/photopost/showgallery.php/cat/518 )
      • Central Michigan University “Zooplankton of the Great Lakes” ( www.cst.cmich.edu/users/mcnau1as/zooplankton%20web/index.html )
      • Micrographia ( www.micrographia.com )
      • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory ( http://www.glerl.noaa.gov/pubs/photogallery/Waterlife/index.html )
      • United States Environmental Protection Agency Great Lakes National Program Office ( www.epa.gov/glnpo/atlas/index.html )
      • United States Geological Survey Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database ( http:// nas.er.usgs.gov / )
      • All pictures and drawings not cited during the presentation were provided by Inland Seas Education Association. These pictures can be used freely for educational purposes if ISEA is correctly attributed. All commercial use of these pictures is prohibited.