Our Scores are Great?!

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Our Scores are Great?!

  1. 1. OUR SCORES LOOK GREAT! OR DO THEY?
  2. 2. Arbutus Middle School 7th Grade Mathematics
  3. 3. 2010 Mathematics— Grade 7 MSA by Race/Ethnicity - Advanced + Proficient Percent Year All Students American Indian / Alaskan Native Asian/Pacific Islander African American White (not of Hispanic origin) Hispanic % # % # % # % # % # % # 2010 76.5 186 243 * * 94.4 17 18 62.5 40 64 80.3 122 152 85.7 6 7 2009 79.2 213 269 * * 94.7 18 19 72.4 42 58 79.9 143 179 90.9 10 11 2008 69.3 194 280 * * 91.7 11 12 50.0 37 74 74.6 138 185 85.7 6 7 2007 67.7 182 269 * * 92.3 12 13 51.4 38 74 71.9 123 171 80.0 8 10 2006 57.6 186 323 * * 88.9 16 18 31.7 26 82 64.5 138 214 40.0 2 5 2005 58.2 188 323 * * 84.6 11 13 29.2 21 72 65.5 154 235 * * 2004 45.6 144 316 -- -- 56.3 9 16 20.7 12 58 51.3 122 238 * * Key # = NUMBER OF STUDENTS THAT PERFORMED IN THIS PROFICIENCY LEVEL OVER THE TOTAL NUMBER OF STUDENTS WHO TOOK MSA. '--' INDICATES NO STUDENT IN THE CATEGORY '*' INDICATES FEWER THAN STUDENTS 5
  4. 4. TWO CONCERNS 1. There are significant gaps in performance across the different subgroups, when examined over time. 2. In order to reach the vision of No Child Left Behind, 100% of students must be proficient/advanced by 2014
  5. 5. STRATEGIES TO ADDRESS THE GAPS • Implementation of “Best Practices” in the math classrooms in the seventh grade. Specifically Teaching for Understanding. This effort encompasses activities oriented toward higher-order thinking skills. These skills are evidenced by problem solving and creating instead of simply reproducing knowledge, greater use of interdisciplinary curriculums and cooperative learning, and assessment on samples of work that illustrate understanding and application rather than memorization and reproduction.
  6. 6. STRATEGIES TO ADDRESS THE GAPS Use of Technology. Technology use is reflected by the ability to use the tools of the future workplace—in particular, a greater emphasis on the use of technology as a tool for learning and producing. It includes such computer tasks as math calculations, writing, and searching the Internet for background information.(The TEACHER DEVELOPMENT NETWORK, 2008)
  7. 7. STRATEGIES TO ADDRESS THE GAPS • Assess the strengths and weaknesses of the current faculty and determine where improvements could be used to improve student achievement for all groups. • Identify services, both offered and possible, that could provide enrichment opportunities to students in subgroups
  8. 8. STRATEGIES TO ADDRESS THE GAPS • Assess the strengths and weaknesses of the current faculty and teaching methodologies in order to determine what skills and/or resources should be added to the program at the school. • Identify services, both current and potential future, that could provide enrichment opportunities to students in subgroups. • After school Learning Centers • Parent Education programs • Peer Homework helpers • Meal programs at school before during • and after school
  9. 9. Strategies to Address the Deadline • Implement strategies to track all student performance, focusing on improving achievement • Professional Development opportunities that will provide educators with the tools to increase student achievement: – Differentiating instruction – Incorporating technology to improve achievement – Classroom management
  10. 10. We’d like to hear from you! • We want to encourage all stakeholders to offer any suggestions or comments Please comment below. Thanks

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